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#227 2021-04-22 17:09:58

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,148

Re: Greenhouse - hydroponics vs soil

buckwheat bump

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#228 2021-06-08 12:03:00

RobertDyck
Moderator
From: Winnipeg, Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 6,542
Website

Re: Greenhouse - hydroponics vs soil

Not sure where to post this, so...

Researchers Create Soil Catalyst to Make Farming on Mars a Reality

Now, a team of scientists has developed a bioinspired catalyst that simplifies the perchlorate removal process and destroys 99 percent of the contaminant at ambient temperatures and pressures. The results provide “a water-compatible, efficient, and robust catalyst to degrade and utilize [perchlorate] for water purification and space exploration,” according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The new research builds on past experiments that make use of anaerobic microbes, tiny organisms that live in oxygen-poor environments. Some of these organisms can survive by harvesting oxygen atoms inside perchlorate, which effectively breaks down the pollutant. The microbes can be cultivated to do this work in industrial reactors, but it can take weeks or months to establish working stability in this process.
...
“The motivation for our catalyst is that we just want to finish the work in a single day.”

“Right now, we have made it very stable, and it can survive under very challenging concentrations,” he added. The catalyst can be used to break down perchlorate at concentrations lower than one milligram per liter up to 10 grams per liter, which means it can be used in many contexts, from treating groundwater to detoxifying Martian soil.

To achieve this result, Liu and his colleagues developed a system based on the chemical element molybdenum, a metal that microbes use as part of their enzymatic harvesting of perchlorate. Using a mix of common fertilizer containing molybdenum, a binding molecule called bipyridine, a catalyst called palladium on carbon, and hydrogen gas, the researchers were able to rapidly disintegrate perchlorate in water at room temperature.

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#229 2021-06-08 17:17:09

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 6,483

Re: Greenhouse - hydroponics vs soil

Alternative strip off the first metre of regolith and then harvest the layer that has few or no perchlorates. My understanding it is solar radiation that creates the perchlorates so they shouldn't be there in lower layers.


RobertDyck wrote:

Not sure where to post this, so...

Researchers Create Soil Catalyst to Make Farming on Mars a Reality

Now, a team of scientists has developed a bioinspired catalyst that simplifies the perchlorate removal process and destroys 99 percent of the contaminant at ambient temperatures and pressures. The results provide “a water-compatible, efficient, and robust catalyst to degrade and utilize [perchlorate] for water purification and space exploration,” according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The new research builds on past experiments that make use of anaerobic microbes, tiny organisms that live in oxygen-poor environments. Some of these organisms can survive by harvesting oxygen atoms inside perchlorate, which effectively breaks down the pollutant. The microbes can be cultivated to do this work in industrial reactors, but it can take weeks or months to establish working stability in this process.
...
“The motivation for our catalyst is that we just want to finish the work in a single day.”

“Right now, we have made it very stable, and it can survive under very challenging concentrations,” he added. The catalyst can be used to break down perchlorate at concentrations lower than one milligram per liter up to 10 grams per liter, which means it can be used in many contexts, from treating groundwater to detoxifying Martian soil.

To achieve this result, Liu and his colleagues developed a system based on the chemical element molybdenum, a metal that microbes use as part of their enzymatic harvesting of perchlorate. Using a mix of common fertilizer containing molybdenum, a binding molecule called bipyridine, a catalyst called palladium on carbon, and hydrogen gas, the researchers were able to rapidly disintegrate perchlorate in water at room temperature.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#230 2021-06-08 19:34:05

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,148

Re: Greenhouse - hydroponics vs soil

If we are going to need to remove soils to get at what is less contaminated without an exploratory mission done before man gets there then we are just going to be out of luck....
If we are going with the assumption that we are doing a soil surface greenhouse is going to be more than a problem if we can not get good soils to grow in....

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#231 2021-06-08 22:21:58

RobertDyck
Moderator
From: Winnipeg, Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 6,542
Website

Re: Greenhouse - hydroponics vs soil

Um, could I suggest Mars Direct? Yea, I know, in 2002 I suggested a modification of Mars Direct. I still think my modification is an improvement, but it's strongly based on Mars Direct. The idea is a human mission to Mars. Humans can dig and determine how deep perchlorates can go. I could mention that after Apollo 11, NASA promised a human mission to Mars in 1981. And they made major progress until Nixon killed Apollo. I could also mention that if Mars Direct were approved when pitched in June 1990, we would most likely have had an unmanned test of equipment to Mars in 1997, and humans on the surface of the Red Planet in 1999. We have the ability, we just need the will.

Mars Direct: does not rely on the greenhouse, but includes a greenhouse as a science experiment.

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