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#76 2021-04-06 09:16:32

kbd512
Administrator
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 4,615

Re: The fusion age has begun.

If MIT's SPARC truly can achieve "Q=10" and the REBCO superconductors produce a magnetic field strong enough to stabilize the plasma, then it's a viable reactor design.  The rest of the major components are functional / usable, as-is.

There are two primary problems with all previous devices built:

1. Q<1
2. Plasma stability associated with low magnetic field strength

The first problem is an absolute show-stopper, even if everything else works flawlessly.  The second problem is also a show-stopper, no matter what Q is equal to.  If both of those problems are resolved in this new design, then the basic fusion reactor design concept is viable and the rest of it is an engineering exercise.

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#77 2021-05-29 18:24:52

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 885

Re: The fusion age has begun.

China’s “Artificial Sun” Fusion Reactor Just Set a World Record
https://futurism.com/chinas-artificial- … rld-record
The reactor got more than 10 times hotter than the core of the Sun.

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#78 2021-06-23 14:26:47

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: The fusion age has begun.

https://currently.att.yahoo.com/finance … 00874.html

The transport process is a bit tricky, and will involve specialized heavy transport vehicles along multiple legs of the journey. After loading each module, General Atomics will ship the pieces to Houston, where a transport ship will pick them up. The company will send Module 1 to sea in late July, and it will arrive in France by late August. ITER estimates that ground transit to the reactor site will take place in early September.

First of six 110 Metric ton magnets

(th)

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#79 2021-06-23 16:57:51

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 6,865

Re: The fusion age has begun.

This thread started ten years ago. And really - what progress has been made? Nothing tangible. Compare and contrast with wind and solar energy plus battery storage.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#80 2021-06-23 17:42:29

Calliban
Member
From: Northern England, UK
Registered: 2019-08-18
Posts: 1,154

Re: The fusion age has begun.

louis wrote:

This thread started ten years ago. And really - what progress has been made? Nothing tangible. Compare and contrast with wind and solar energy plus battery storage.

Plenty.  Here is just one example from the UK.  You just don't know about it, because you aren't interested in it and didn't bother reading into it.  That doesn't mean that progress hasn't been made.
https://arpa-e.energy.gov/sites/default … INGHAM.pdf
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/12 … er-station

There has been similar progress with ICF at Lawrence Livermore, which I personally believe is a more promising approach.  Fusion fission hybrids could be built today.

There has been no technological progress of any significance in wind, solar or battery technologies over the past 10 years.  These technologies are mature.  In many respects, Dutch windmills of the early 20th century were better optimised and more sustainable than the wind turbines of today.  They were built with lower embodied energy, sustainable materials.  They didn't wear out in 20 years and their stone and brick towers remain to this day, many of them remain operable.  And they had ways of working that allowed them to manage intermittent energy generation.  What progress has been made in the development of wind power over the past 100 years?  How tangible do you suppose it is?  Solar power is as old as the pyramids.  Solar thermal power plants are as old as diesel engines.  Battery power has been around for even longer.  Thomas Edison's nickel iron batteries of over a century ago, are more durable than anything being used today.  In fact, many of them still operate.  Compressed air energy storage and pumped storage are even older.  If anything, these technologies worked better in the past than they do now.  I would argue that wind and solar power have moved backwards.  They have gone from being simple and durable technologies, to over-complex and unsuitable technologies.

Last edited by Calliban (2021-06-23 17:59:06)


Interested in space science, engineering and technology.

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#81 2021-07-14 06:26:19

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 885

Re: The fusion age has begun.

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#82 2021-08-06 07:38:19

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 885

Re: The fusion age has begun.

This Company Is Aiming To Become The First One To Provide Commercial Fusion Power

https://wonderfulengineering.com/this-c … ion-power/

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#83 2021-08-18 08:15:23

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: The fusion age has begun.

The article at the link below is an update on progress at the laser fusion lab in California/US.

https://currently.att.yahoo.com/news/us … 36523.html

US lab stands on threshold of key nuclear fusion goal
Paul Rincon - Science editor, BBC News website
Wed, August 18, 2021, 8:19 AM

Progress appears to be slow but steady.  Break-even remains a goal, but that goal appears to be closer.

(th)

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#84 2021-09-10 06:49:09

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 885

Re: The fusion age has begun.

US team claims viable path to commercial fusion power

https://www.theengineer.co.uk/mit-cfs-c … ion-power/

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#85 2021-09-10 20:25:00

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: The fusion age has begun.

Here's another report, as a follow up to Mars_B4_Moon Post #84

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolo … hp&pc=U531

The MIT and CFS team is hoping to have a test plant operational by 2025.

"It's a big moment," says Bob Mumgaard, CEO of CFS. "We now have a platform that is both scientifically very well-advanced, because of the decades of research on these machines, and also commercially very interesting.

"What it does is allow us to build devices faster, smaller, and at less cost."

The new superconducting magnet is reported to achieve 20 Tesla.

Trying to merge this magnet type with a plasma chamber remains ahead.

(th)

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