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#326 2021-09-17 18:14:47

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,311

Re: COTS - status

How to manage a nut in space so that you do not die by the one but what if its more? Since there are other possible out comes maybe more testing in stressful situations might be in order.
I am sure they all learn how to push buttons to control the ship but you could also switch on the auto pilot control system for remote control from the earths system control center to take over.

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#327 2021-10-07 08:08:45

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,820
Website

Re: COTS - status

From AIAA's "Daily Launch" email newsletter for today.  GW

Starliner Won’t Attempt Launch Again This Year; Astronauts Reassigned To SpaceX Mission
The Wall Street Journal (10/6, Subscription Publication) reports that NASA announced Wednesday that The Boeing Company’s Starliner will not attempt a launch again this year, and the two astronauts intended to fly on it have been reassigned to a mission using a SpaceX ship.

        Bloomberg (10/6) reports that astronauts Nicole Mann and Josh Cassada “will transfer from the Starliner to launch aboard NASA’s Crew-5 mission on a SpaceX Dragon, which is scheduled to fly late next year.”

        The Hill (10/6) reports that Boeing said, “we understand the agency’s need to make adjustments to get members of the current astronaut class flying experience on an operational vehicle while the development of the Starliner spacecraft continues. We fully support NASA’s decisions and remain committed to putting the safety of the astronauts who will fly on our vehicle first.”

        SPACE (10/6) reports that while Starliner waits for its valve issue to be resolved, SpaceX “has already launched one crewed test mission and two operational flights to the orbiting lab with its Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon capsule, and the company is gearing up for the liftoff of its third contracted flight, Crew-3, later this month.”


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#328 2021-10-07 21:31:05

kbd512
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Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 5,514

Re: COTS - status

Well, so much for competition.

We really can't get at least two companies to produce a human-rated space capsule?

Something is seriously messed up over there at Boeing, and Lockheed-Martin, for that matter.

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#329 2021-10-08 20:35:10

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,311

Re: COTS - status

If it was not for the SLS tiring up all of their time along with Boeing airplane issues maybe they could get something done.

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#330 2021-10-09 17:39:09

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,311

Re: COTS - status

Boeing's next Starliner test flight moves to first half of 2022

Engineers have narrowed down the likely causes of the oxidizer isolation valve problem that forced the team to scrap the August 2021 launch, but it remains a "complex issue" that requires a "methodical approach" to solve, according to Commercial Crew Program manager Steve Stich.

So a small tweak of the capsule or fix the software sensor issues...

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#331 2021-12-29 10:09:10

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,311

Re: COTS - status

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/
Boeing to Move Up Service Modules for Commercial Crew Flight Tests

“NASA has been working side-by-side with Boeing on the service module valve investigation, including leveraging the agency’s materials and propellants expertise to better characterize the potential causes of the issue,” said Steve Stich, manager, NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.
Following extensive testing and analysis of oxidizer isolation valves on Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner service module propulsion system, Boeing has decided to move up service modules currently in production for its upcoming uncrewed and crewed flight tests to the International Space Station as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.

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#332 2021-12-29 16:11:35

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,820
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Re: COTS - status

I hate when spin trumps truth. 

It appears to me that the corroded valves pretty much "destroyed" the service module they were going to fly.  It has to be either torn apart and rebuilt,  or scrapped.  Nobody is saying.

Whatever "fix" they decided to use for the valve corrosion problem,  was easier to implement on service modules still being built,  which is why they are saying they will use one still currently "in-production" for the unmanned test flight to ISS,  instead of the one they had.

Did you notice also that nobody has yet said anything substantive about what that "fix" is for the corroded valve problem?  That suggests they have some ideas,  but no "sure things".  Which is why I think we will likely see that "fix" change with each flight for a while.

We will see if Starliner ever becomes a real taxi to the ISS.  Boeing's corporate management has yet to learn that good engineering and good reputation are absolute constraints upon their quest to maximize profit above all else.  Not doing the good engineering with 737MAX, 777X,  and 787 assembly,  plus being decades late and billions in the red with SLS,  has already ruined their reputation with a bunch of folks.  It will take years to rebuild that.  The proximate cause is typical business school BS.

GW

Last edited by GW Johnson (2021-12-29 16:13:05)


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#333 2022-04-10 07:50:33

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 2,039

Re: COTS - status

SpaceX launches three private visitors to space station

https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/n … ation-42m/

Orbital Transportation Services?

Rocketplane Kistler received only $32.1 million before NASA terminated their contract for failure to complete milestones.

Cygnus spacecraft is an expendable American cargo spacecraft developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation and now manufactured and launched by Northrop Grumman Space Systems
https://web.archive.org/web/20130417064 … es-cygnus/

Bill Gerstenmaier many years back already confirmed that NASA was no longer purchasing any cargo resupply services from Russia and would rely solely on the American CRS vehicles, the SpaceX Dragon and Orbital Sciences' Cygnus; with the exception of a few vehicle-specific payloads delivered on the European ATV and the Japanese HTV
https://ghostarchive.org/varchive/youtu … JNNiYPyAeQ

The new flight launched on 8 April 2022, from Kennedy Space Center. The crew consists of Michael López-Alegría, a professionally trained astronaut hired by Axiom Space, Eytan Stibbe from Israel, Larry Connor from the United States and Mark Pathy from Canada.

After SpaceX launch from KSC, Axiom-1 private-astronaut mission docks with space station

https://www.yahoo.com/now/spacex-launch … 17829.html

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-04-10 07:56:05)

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#334 2022-05-09 08:39:36

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 2,039

Re: COTS - status

Telstar 1 although it no longer works, it is still in Earth orbit. Planned private spaceflights beyond Earth orbit include personal spaceflights around the Moon. Planned private spaceflights beyond Earth orbit include solar sailing concept prototypes such as 'LightSail' The Planetary Society stated that they had raised LightSail 2 orbit by a measurable amount, although it has spent a significant amount of its time randomly tumbling. SpaceHab has become Astrotech Corporation Prior to the 2014 Lockheed Martin acquisition, Astrotech provided both the government and commercial space markets with satellite processing services. Andrews Space is now Spaceflight Systems, a subsidiary of Spaceflight Industries, Inc. ISS contest or Interplanet COTS was a NASA strategy for cargo to ISS, COTS was a demonstration of the Private Sectors Commercial Partners’ (CPs) capability, NASA believes the COTS saved them Billions.

RocketPlane Kistler missed financial milestones and NASA terminated funding for the project.  Transformational Space Corporation) was an American aerospace company which participated in NASA's COTS, and later, Commercial Crew Development, October 2008 SpaceDev officials announced that the company would be acquired by Sierra Nevada Corporation, RocketPlane Kistler filed for chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2010
http://www.newspacejournal.com/2010/07/ … cketplane/

Momentus' Vigoride spacecraft arrives at launch site for first flight with SpaceX
https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Mome … X_999.html
Momentus Inc. (NASDAQ: MNTS), a U.S. commercial space company that plans to offer transportation and other in-space infrastructure services, has announced that its Vigoride orbital transfer vehicle has arrived at Cape Canaveral, Florida, for its inaugural launch.
The Vigoride spacecraft and customer payloads will now be integrated with SpaceX's Falcon 9 launch vehicle ahead of the Transporter-5 mission targeted for launch in May. The primary goals of Vigoride's inaugural mission are to test the spacecraft in space, learn from any issues encountered, and incorporate lessons learned into future vehicles. Momentus will also take customer payloads to orbit and generate a small amount of revenue.

First all-private crew to International Space Station splashes down safely
https://www.cbc.ca/news/science/axiom1- … -1.6430266

Bernie Sanders makes a dishonest attack on commercial space flight
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/rest … ace-flight

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-05-09 08:56:37)

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#335 2022-05-14 14:40:13

GW Johnson
Member
From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,820
Website

Re: COTS - status

From 5-12-22 “Daily Launch”:

Disagreement On “Root Cause” Of Valve Issue Ahead Of Starliner Launch

Reuters (5/11) reports that The Boeing Company is in a disagreement “with Aerojet Rocketdyne (AJRD.N), a key supplier for its Starliner spacecraft, as the U.S. aerospace giant races to test launch the uncrewed astronaut capsule and mend its reputation in the space sector, people familiar with the matter said.” The CST-100 Starliner “is scheduled for a May 19 Florida launch atop an Atlas 5 rocket to the International Space Station, with Boeing aiming to show NASA that the spacecraft is safe to ferry astronauts to and from the orbiting outpost.” The sources indicated that Boeing and Aerojet “are at odds over the cause of a problem involving fuel valves in the Starliner propulsion system that forced a postponement of a test flight last July, with the two companies faulting one another.”

From the 5-13-22 “Daily Launch”:

NASA Clears Starliner For Launch Next Week

Spaceflight Now (5/11) reported that NASA officials “cleared Boeing’s Starliner crew capsule for launch next week in a flight readiness review Wednesday, moving a step closer toward a critical unpiloted demonstration flight to attempt docking at the International Space Station and check off other test objectives left unaccomplished on a problem-plagued mission two-and-a-half years ago.” The Starliner spacecraft “is set to launch from Cape Canaveral on the Orbital Flight Test-2, or OFT-2, mission May 19 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket.”

        SPACE (5/12) reports that Starliner is on track “to launch on May 19 at 6:54 p.m. EDT (2254 GMT) from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41 in coastal Florida – assuming no weather or technical issues arise.”

        Space News (5/12, Subscription Publication) reports that The Boeing Company “is considering redesigning the propellant valves on future CST-100 Starliner commercial crew spacecraft as a long-term solution to the corrosion problem those valves suffered last year.”

My takes:

Makes you wonder why NASA cleared the launch,  when Boeing and Aerojet Rocketdyne are publicly pointing fingers at each other over the valve corrosion problem experienced last time. 

It also makes you wonder why,  after two and a half years,  that the “long term solution” (other than a “redesign”) to the valve corrosion problem still eludes Boeing. 

See also what I said in post 332 above.

GW

Last edited by GW Johnson (2022-05-14 14:42:05)


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#336 2022-05-14 16:33:16

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,311

Re: COTS - status

It appeared that the valves were cleaned after they had seen fuel which would indicate a chemical reaction which caused the issue

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