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#1 2018-08-29 17:52:05

louis
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From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 4,900

3D construction - lessons for Mars

US military now using 3D printing techniques:

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/08/29/ … hours.html

Could see that potentially working on Mars - but would probably have to take place under a construction hab to achieve the right temperature, I imagine.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#2 2018-08-29 20:04:31

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

That is really not a new thing but just trials to tell what it can do with what they need. This is a means to build without using concrete forms to create the walls. The layering we have talked about before in other 3D topics.....

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#3 2018-08-30 04:33:28

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 4,900

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

Yes, I know it's not "new". The advance is in doing this out in the real world under what might not be ideal conditions.

SpaceNut wrote:

That is really not a new thing but just trials to tell what it can do with what they need. This is a means to build without using concrete forms to create the walls. The layering we have talked about before in other 3D topics.....


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#4 2018-08-30 17:22:14

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

just did a bump of just some of the cross linking topics for concrete....

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#5 2018-09-01 10:14:56

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

Edit note that these are examples of Plot0003

Mars will most likely be of small structures and one shape that would be easily built via 3D could be this onnly larger.

abod-shelter-1.jpg

A possible typical dome construction that has above ground and below surface attributes for mars.

BBMdStA.img?h=416&w=799&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f

Article boast, 3D concrete printer to print a 500-square-foot barracks room in just 40 hours.

1535557760175.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

Looks like alot of rails to make it work that must be laid down accurately before the system will work.

That is quite the achievement of time and scale but how many hows and what are the energy costs to make what you need to feed this machine with?

This was asked and I have modified it for this topic:

kbd512 wrote:

if we stick to concrete and composite construction materials, the cost to live in affordable homes could go down in a dramatic way.   

house could be affordably constructed from durable and inexpensive domestically produced aircraft construction materials
or prototypical insulation materials.  The composite building materials seem to be much cheaper and more durable than traditional materials.

Mars is very unique to building as we have little natural building materials to make use of. I do think composites will play an important part as well as other aircraft construction techiques.

So of a good question for Mars since these are energy costs but would be possible to do as there are no costs after sending the mining, processing and other such items to be able to use them in the construction process.

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#6 2019-01-24 19:33:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

lunar base concepts ESA ran a competition, asking: what would you 3D print on the Moon, to make it feel like home? Winning ideas for 3D printing on the Moon

https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Prep … o_the_Moon

The 3D printing techniques selected to be the most interesting for lunar exploration – due to their versatility, space-readiness and ability to process a range of materials – are:

Solar sintering which concentrates sunlight to shape lunar soil into a variety of objects – mostly for infrastructure – such as habitat, landing pads and dust protection walls;

Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing which uses a vacuum to create an electron beam that can be used to produce large metal parts;

Fused filament fabrication which has the possibility to create a wide range of materials and has already been tested in low gravity conditions;

Lithography-based ceramic manufacturing which can use lunar soil to create ceramic items with very precise dimensions.

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#7 2019-03-12 19:05:47

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

void wrote:

MARSHA:
Teslarati 3D-Printed Mars Habitat could be a perfect for early spaxeX starship colonies, MARSHA
I do https://www.teslarati.com/3d-printed-ma … -colonies/

Thanks for the link to others wanting to print habitats on mars or other places but what they do not go into is the prep side of the equation needed to make the materials to be use for the machinery to utilize it to build with from the insitu resources.

Very cone like indeed...

This is from AI SpaceFactory achieved second place in the latest phase of a NASA-led competition

MARSHA-Mars-habitat-colony-AI-Space-Factory-8-crop-2.jpg

If I do find the other simular posts I will copy them here so that we will have a list of whom are attempting the technology, the equipment and the materials information of what is targeted for insitu materials.

3D-printed Mars habitat a biorenewable plastic (PLA) reinforced with locally-sourced basalt fiber – also accounts for many of Mars’ shortcomings, as plastics happen to be some of the best materials for radiation shielding per unit of mass. Featuring a duo of PLA shells placing a meter or more of plastic between living areas, MARSHA would permit relatively acceptable radiation levels while avoiding the downsides of locating habitats underground or burying them under several meters of Martian regolith.

MARSHA-Mars-habitat-colony-AI-Space-Factory-1-c-712x249.jpg

NASA's Centennial Challenges: 3-D Printed Habitat Challenge
https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/space … index.html

3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. NASA and its partners are holding a $3.15 million competition to build a 3D printed habitat for deep space exploration, including the agency’s journey to Mars. The multi-phase challenge is designed to advance the construction technology needed to create sustainable housing solutions for Earth and beyond.

https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/space … mpetition/

After two stages where NASA awarded a total of over $1 million to competitors, the final prize was awarded to the top 5 projects.

Something that I would suggest is dropping a unit in one of the analog areas and run the insitu use processes from scratch to see just how hard it is to prepare the raw materials to make it ready for use for the equipment. Measure and test all aspects of it so that we can have better control to what we might find from the earth use.

https://www.3dprintingmedia.network/top … mpetition/

search_apis_cor_3dph-780x405.jpg

Team Zopherus of Rogers, Arkansas – $20,957.95
AI. SpaceFactory of New York – $20,957.24
Kahn-Yates of Jackson, Mississippi – $20,622.74
SEArch+/Apis Cor of New York – $19,580.97
Northwestern University of Evanston, Illinois – $17,881.10

teamzopherus_3dph_1.jpg

These are beautiful for sure

nasa-3d-printed-habitat-mars-competition-design_dezeen_2364_hero-2.jpg

A very firmiliar designed floor layout
northwesternuniversity_3dph_1.jpg

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#8 2019-08-10 12:37:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

All of the companies doing research and techniques have pushed some things forward as being possible but when would we senbd them to a destination to be used.

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#9 2019-09-03 09:39:29

tahanson43206
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Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 1,055

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

For SpaceNut re topic ...

As time passes, 3D printing technology is improving on multiple fronts.

A newsletter that came my way recently included this update, which (I hope) is pertinent to the Mars project:

White paper: The Fast Radius Guide to Additive Polymers
Fast Radius

You can make end-use parts with additive polymers. Really. Today's additive materials can do so much more than prototype. The latest white paper from Fast Radius busts common myths about additive, provides a framework for replacing traditional materials with additive polymers, and presents a guide to the mechanical properties of common polymers used in industrial-grade 3D printing.

What I'm noting here is the use of the expression "industrial-grade". 

The hobby printers sold in stores or over the Internet are what most folks encounter.  I'm deducing the paper above is about something considerably more robust.

(th)

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#10 2019-09-03 11:34:53

Calliban
Member
From: Northern England, UK
Registered: 2019-08-18
Posts: 67

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

Interesting.  The problem with 3D printing is that molten material is bonded to a solid substrate.  This makes it unsuitable for construction of structures the need to take tensile forces, such as pressurised structures, but generally works fine for compressive structures.  The problem is even more intractable if ceramic materials are used.

One solution would be to use pre-stressing cables or tendons to provide a compressive force on the structure that balances the pressure within.  A cylinder shaped ceramic structure could be reinforced by internal, longitudinal, pre-stressing cables.  These would provide enough longitudinal force to balance radial atmospheric pressure through frictional forces between the compressed ceramic materials.  Further reinforcement could be provided by external steel locking brackets.

The cables could be made from low carbon steel, glass or basalt fibres or polymers.  It would be wise to choose materials that did not creep, although internal cables would be easy to replace.


Interested in space science, engineering and technology.

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#11 2019-09-03 11:47:46

tahanson43206
Member
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 1,055

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

For Calliban re #10

While noting the validity of your observations about additive manufacturing for many (if not most) use cases, I would like to suggest (if you have time) to put this search string into Google: "3d printed rocket engine"

Progress in printing structures able to withstand tensile forces appears to have taken place, but again, well away from the hobbyist arena.

(th)

Last edited by tahanson43206 (2019-09-03 11:48:14)

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#12 2019-09-03 17:12:32

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,150

Re: 3D construction - lessons for Mars

Calliban the process do make things that while they stand up to some conditions will need more reinforcing to make them work for the mars condition. The basalt fiber comes to mind for wrapping the outside to give the building strength while epoxy sealants would work to make it air tight. One can also add to the internal layers with aerogel insulation panels and other materials to make it stand up under pressure.

Martian Soil Simulants – Mechanical Properties and Feasibility as Building Blocks

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