New Mars Forums

Official discussion forum of The Mars Society and MarsNews.com

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Announcement: We've recently made changes to our user database and have removed inactive and spam users. If you can not login, please re-register.

#51 2017-05-17 23:03:00

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

Another game changer is that some one has been working on a human transport rover for mars....sure is not what some have envisioned...There's off-roading, and then there's off-roading on Mars.

This Futuristic Mars Rover Looks Like an Awesome NASA Tank

aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kvMDAwLzA2NS85NTIvb3JpZ2luYWwvbWFycy1yb3Zlci1uYXNhLWtzYy1jb25jZXB0LmpwZw==

This sleek, black, monster of a Mars rover is a concept design of a vehicle that might one day transport astronauts across the Red Planet. To me, it looks like "The Martian" met a tank with a "Knight Rider" obsession and spawned a Mars car that runs on awesome.

http://www.businessinsider.com/nasa-mar … dek-2017-5

The concept rover was designed by Marc Parker of Parker Brothers Concepts. It's 23 feet long (7 meters), 13 feet wide (4 m), 11 feet tall (3.3 m) and weighs an estimated 5,000 lbs. (2,268 kilograms).

The track tires are a combination design with moving plates to compensate for the banging that the rovers have seen by rolling against sharp rocks....
nasa-mars-rover-concept-prototype-parker-brothers-concepts.jpg

Offline

#52 2017-05-18 03:54:24

elderflower
Member
Registered: 2016-06-19
Posts: 435

Re: Mars Cart

Why such a complex shape?

Offline

#53 2017-05-18 17:52:51

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

The front nose I assume is to allow as much visability of the driver and passenger to see what is near the rover. The remaining crew would be seated just behind the pair as you would normally be seated.

The wheels are to be able to obsorb the pounding that we would see as humans would be driving and possibly not so slow as the nasa rovers crawl at.

The heaviest part of the rover is in the rear as it carries the water, food, oxygen, batteries and the equipment means to make it all work.

I see 2 solar panels on the side but I also would assume that there is another pair on the opposite side with probably more on the flat roof of the crew carrier, to which its possible that 8 is the final count of these solar panels for power for the vehicle, since its an all electric vehicle.

From one view it appears that a drop gate to serve as a ramp for the crew to exit is also doubling as the air lock door.

Offline

#54 2017-05-18 20:05:36

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 1,074

Re: Mars Cart

That truck looks like a roll-over waiting to happen if anyone attempts to drive it at appreciable speed over rough terrain.  The CG height will be above where the Type 60's roof ends.  Given its size and weight of only 2.6t, it can't be a very sturdy truck, either.  I wonder about the ultimate durability of the wheels, but I'll withhold judgement until testing is complete because stranger things have worked.  The truck will still exert more ground pressure than a tracked vehicle twice as heavy.  I don't think this truck will perform very well over sand or loose rock, especially if it's on an incline.  Trying to save that much weight on a vehicle that pretty much requires its own transport to Mars as a function of physical size is penny-wise, pound foolish.

The Type 60 is less than 4 feet high, about 7 and a half feet wide, and 14 feet long.  You could stack two of them in the payload fairing of a Falcon Heavy.  They won't look nearly as cool as that truck does, but ultimate durability, general utility, and payload capacity are the qualities that actually matter.  It's a very futuristic looking truck, but not practical for years of off-road use on another planet with rugged terrain.

Offline

#55 2017-05-18 21:31:11

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

The few views I can see appear to have independant suspension for each wheel and since the mass of the vehicles is between the wheels I so no problems with normal use but if we are stupid sure it will roll....but so will any vehicle under that condition that changes mass direction....

Offline

#56 2017-05-19 16:17:51

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 1,074

Re: Mars Cart

SpaceNut,

It's easier not to fight physics.  If you hold a weight close to your body, it's easier to control it than when the weight is held in an outstretched arm.  Mechanical advantage applies to man and machine alike.

The question I would like answered is "Why are you trying to fight with something that need not be fought with?"

What substantial benefit(s) does maintaining a CG height five feet in the air confer to this smallish monster truck?  It's not a question of whether or not we can do it.  We've already answered that question.  We've done it.  Now I want to know what capabilities were worth what is otherwise needless complexity, because "it looks cool" is not a beneficial automotive engineering feature.

Offline

#57 2017-05-19 19:39:17

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

I take it that you would perfer something more like this vehicle:

72eec50256b791925c6e0dd86651c915.jpg

The monster truck vehicles do just fine climbing over rocks that other wise would crack the bottom plate of a vehicle that is close to the ground.

But then again this is all that loius would want:
282e14c73e3fab8f31426dfd20e2e506.jpg

Offline

#58 2017-05-20 01:47:53

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 1,074

Re: Mars Cart

SpaceNut,

To begin with, don't smack any pressurized vehicles into rocks.  Those of us who enjoy watching rock climbers have seen more than a few of them tumble and break axles.  Rock climbing is just not something you would do in any pressurized vehicle if you were concerned about your own survival.  I don't think rocks will crack half inch thick Titanium alloy plate, either, at least not at 25kph.  If you want to go faster, then you need a seriously durable vehicle and the 2,200kg truck shown above ain't it.  If you already know that 100% of usage will be off-road and you want to transport cargo, then select the right vehicle for that task.

Offline

#59 2017-07-06 18:12:27

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

It would seem that Nasa is still intent on the moon being the start to the gateway to mars and beyond. So while its a start out of LEO we can make the best of it for trials of gear for mars on the moon. Test driving a mars vehicle on the moon would not be a distraction but the means to get funding for what we would want to see on Mars.
The dark rover from hollywood would need to be colored something other than black as any crew would bake inside it. The cooling and heat exchangers would be put to the test. Power systems could be tested out as well for what it takes to survive and so much more.....

Rover content
Hard Suits/Hard Shells: Recent Developments in 3D-Printed Hard Suits and Single-Person Space Utility Vehicles

Offline

#60 2017-07-07 15:28:35

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 1,074

Re: Mars Cart

Exoskeleton systems are just about to the point where they're feasible from a mass and power consumption standpoint.  Add wheels and maybe a jet pack and you then become a "transformer" (except you're really a "human in disguise").

Offline

#61 2017-07-07 19:02:28

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Mars Cart

nah just borrow the one's from the movie set....

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB