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#151 2022-05-24 06:59:27

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

The James Webb Space Telescope could detect Earth 2.0

https://technuws.com/the-james-webb-spa … earth-2-0/

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#152 2022-05-28 13:30:01

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

NASA James Webb Target Acquired: A Super-Earth Covered in Lava Oceans

https://www.cnet.com/science/space/nasa … va-oceans/

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#153 2022-05-29 16:24:18

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

James Webb Space Telescope to study far reaches of Milky Way
https://news.yahoo.com/james-webb-space … 55042.html
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope could soon provide some answers about other planets in the far reaches of the Milky Way

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#154 2022-05-29 16:32:34

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Making key discoveries already...and lots more to come as it gets going with times being allotted for use.

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#155 2022-06-07 05:19:52

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

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#156 2022-06-09 07:43:10

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

James Webb Space Telescope suffers 1st noticeable micrometeoroid impact just months into flight

https://www.space.com/james-webb-space- … id-impacts

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#157 2022-06-14 19:14:50

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

NASA Invites Media, Public to View Webb Telescope's First Images

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa … rst-images

VHS 1256ABb — a young, low-mass companion at a wide separation from a low mass binary star. Because it is easier to observe but quite similar to HIP 65426b, the team will be trying out Webb's spectroscopic modes on this target.

https://twitter.com/ESA_Webb/status/1537012305917100032

July 12: Media Opportunities
https://twitter.com/NASAWebb/status/1536739500361228289
12 pm ET (16 UTC) - NASA and its partners will hold a joint media briefing.
Starting 3 pm ET (19 UTC) - Webb experts will be available to conduct live, remote interviews in both English and Spanish.

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-06-15 04:35:27)

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#158 2022-06-27 16:19:16

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

NASA confirms release date for 1st James Webb telescope colored image
https://www.tweaktown.com/news/87057/na … index.html

James Webb Space Telescope will study Milky Way's monster black hole
https://www.space.com/james-webb-space- … artnership

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#159 2022-06-28 11:09:46

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

What comes after the James Webb Space Telescope? Some astronomers want LIFE.
https://www.popsci.com/science/next-jam … xoplanets/

TESS finds a star with two hot transiting terrestrial planets 33 light years away.
https://news.mit.edu/2022/multiplanet-s … earby-0615

So far we've confirmed more than 5,000+ planets beyond our solar system. Exactly 0 of them are just like Earth. We've found raining glass and lava oceans. Some planets have two suns, others have three.
https://twitter.com/NASAExoplanets/stat … 6703265792

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-06-29 09:17:43)

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#160 2022-06-29 10:12:24

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Webb Space Telescope’s Science Goals

https://esawebb.org/videos/JWST_SpaceSparks_001/

James Webb Space Telescope Will Collab With EHT To Study Milky Way's Monster Black Hole

https://www.republicworld.com/science/s … eshow.html

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-06-29 10:13:27)

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#161 2022-06-30 05:33:12

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

The first full-color photos from the James Webb Space Telescope are coming

https://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/j … -rcna35902

NASA scientists say images from the Webb telescope nearly brought them to tears

https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/06 … telescope/

the images and other data would include the deepest-field image of the universe ever taken—looking further into the cosmos than humans ever have before—as well as the spectrum of an atmosphere around an exoplanet.

James Webb Telescope's first image will be the 'deepest image of the universe ever taken'

https://www.audacy.com/krld/news/nation … e-universe

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#162 2022-06-30 18:51:06

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Lots of pretty pictures but what is the science?

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#163 2022-07-02 17:07:28

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Tidal Heating Could Make Exomoons Much More Habitable and Detectable
https://www.universetoday.com/156444/ti … etectable/

SpaceNut wrote:

Lots of pretty pictures but what is the science?

FGS/NIRISS  a Fine Guidance Sensor and Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph , led by the Canadian Space Agency under project scientist John Hutchings (Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Centre, National Research Council), is used to stabilize the line-of-sight of the observatory during science observations.  NIRSpec (Near InfraRed Spectrograph) will also perform spectroscopy over the same wavelength range. NIRCam (Near InfraRed Camera) is an infrared imager which will have a spectral coverage ranging from the edge of the visible (0.6 μm) through to the near infrared (5 μm). MIRI (Mid-InfraRed Instrument) will measure the mid-to-long-infrared wavelength range from 5 to 27 μm. It contains both a mid-infrared camera and an imaging spectrometer.
https://jwst.nasa.gov/faq.html#howbig
JWST also has a starlight-blocking coronagraphs like Soho but for observation of faint targets such as extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks very close to bright stars, it probably can hook up with Hubble and other Ground Based telescopes to get confirmation on its results.

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#164 2022-07-02 17:31:17

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

How to Watch NASA Release the First James Webb Space Telescope Images

https://www.cnet.com/science/space/how- … pe-images/

gif uploads https://giphy.com/esawebb , instagram https://www.instagram.com/esawebb/

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-02 17:35:37)

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#165 2022-07-04 10:41:57

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Webb's First Images in
https://webb.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/countdown.html
7 days

Attend, virtually or in-person, one of hundreds of official Webb Space Telescope Community Events
https://blogs.nasa.gov/webb/

Videos Demonstrating the JWST Data Analysis Visualization Tool Now Available
https://www.stsci.edu/contents/news/jws … -available

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#166 2022-07-07 09:03:17

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

instruments
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVByTTYJF3M

How engineers got the world’s most powerful space telescope ready to do science
https://www.theverge.com/2022/7/7/23188 … -engineers

Now, the commissioning team is entering a new phase. Soon, JWST will enter its first year of science observations — what’s known as Cycle 1 science — which is jam-packed with plans to target exoplanets, galaxies, exotic stars, and more. Those working with JWST’s instruments will move into a support role for the astronomers who have time with the observatory in the first year. Those scientists will inevitably have questions about how to use this powerful new observatory or how to interpret their results, and the instrument teams at NASA and STScI will need to be on hand to provide answers. “The observatory will be used in ways that we haven’t completely experienced yet,” says Friedman. “So we’ll be watching that carefully.”

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#167 2022-07-09 04:48:04

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Twitter Hubble
https://twitter.com/NASAHubble/status/1 … 1286141953

WASP-96b
a gas giant exoplanet. Its mass is 0.48 Jupiters. It is 0.0453 AU from the class G star WASP-96, which it orbits every 3.4 days. It is about 1120 light-years away, in the constellation Phoenix. It was discovered in 2013 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP).
It shines brightly from sodium, apparently because its atmosphere is free of clouds.
https://astronomy.com/news/2018/05/the- … -exoplanet

Southern Ring Nebula
NGC 3132 (also known as the Eight-Burst Nebula, the Southern Ring Nebula, or Caldwell ) already imaged by Hubble
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble


Stephan’s Quintet
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap211218.html


SMACS 0723  , foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/relics … 23-73.html


Carina Nebula
one of the largest and brightest nebulae in the sky, located approximately 7,600 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap220425.html

another article says it can explore the Solar system
Jupiter and its moons will be a 'proving ground' for the James Webb Space Telescope
https://www.space.com/james-webb-space- … servations

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-09 04:57:31)

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#168 2022-07-12 12:03:36

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

There was a disaster of a badly organized Press Presentation with Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, they arrived late and audio and video were cut early so it's not worth watching.

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#169 2022-07-12 12:05:15

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Lots and lots of images and data coming out.

Maybe the other press gathering can be forgotten. However it seems JWST has made some great discovery

A light curve from Webb’s Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) shows the change in brightness of light from the WASP-96 star system over time as the planet transits the star.
https://webbtelescope.org/contents/medi … 40c26f4c97

Although full analysis of the spectrum will take additional time, it is possible to draw a number of preliminary conclusions. The labeled peaks in the spectrum indicate the presence of water vapor. The height of the water peaks, which is less than expected based on previous observations, is evidence for the presence of clouds that suppress the water vapor features. The gradual downward slope of the left side of the spectrum (shorter wavelengths) is indicative of possible haze. The height of the peaks along with other characteristics of the spectrum is used to calculate an atmospheric temperature of about 1350°F (725°C). 

This is the most detailed infrared exoplanet transmission spectrum ever collected, the first transmission spectrum that includes wavelengths longer than 1.6 microns with such high resolution and accuracy, and the first to cover the entire wavelength range from 0.6 microns (visible red light) to 2.8 microns (near-infrared) in a single shot. The speed with which researchers have been able to make confident interpretations of the spectrum is further testament to the quality of the data.

The observation was made using NIRISS’s Single-Object Slitless Spectroscopy (SOSS) mode, which involves capturing the spectrum of a single bright object, like the star WASP-96, in a field of view

Exoplanet WASP-96 b (NIRISS Transit Light Curve)

To capture these data, Webb stared at the WASP-96 star system for 6 hours 23 minutes, beginning about 2½ hours before the transit and ending about 1½ hours after the transit was complete. The transit itself lasted for just under 2½ hours. The curve includes a total of 280 individual brightness measurements – one every 1.4 minutes.

Because the observation was made using a spectrograph, which spreads the light out into hundreds of individual wavelengths, each of the 280 points on the graph represents the combined brightness of thousands of wavelengths of infrared light.

The actual dimming caused by the planet is extremely small: The difference between the brightest and dimmest points is less than 1.5 percent. NIRISS is ideally suited for this observation because it has the ability to observe relatively bright targets over time, along with the sensitivity needed to measure such small differences in brightness: In this observation, the instrument was able to measure differences in brightness as small as 0.02 percent.

Although the presence, size, mass, and orbit of the planet had already been determined based on previous transit observations, this transit light curve can be used to confirm and refine existing measurements, such as the planet’s diameter, the timing of the transit, and the planet’s orbital properties.

WASP-96 b is a hot gas giant exoplanet that orbits a Sun-like star roughly 1,150 light-years away, in the constellation Phoenix. The planet orbits extremely close to its star (less than 1/20th the distance between Earth and the Sun) and completes one orbit in less than 3½ Earth-days. The planet’s discovery, from ground-based observations, was announced in 2014.


Through the Looking GLASS: A JWST Exploration of Galaxy Formation and Evolution from Cosmic Dawn to Present Day

https://www.stsci.edu/jwst/science-exec … ogram-1324

Galaxies and Intergalactic Medium

https://webbtelescope.org/contents/medi … 40c26f4c97


Better together. International collaboration gave us the most powerful space telescope ever made, and the deepest infrared views of the universe ever seen. With our partners at ESA and CSA_ASC, the science can begin.
https://twitter.com/NASA/status/1546884608926646273

Called the Cosmic Cliffs, this image is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula.
https://twitter.com/csa_asc/status/1546877558251200513

Webb Sheds Light on Galaxy Evolution, Black Holes
https://esawebb.org/news/weic2208/

Located in the constellation Pegasus, Stephan’s Quintet was discovered by the French astronomer Édouard Stephan in 1877.

Stephan’s Quintet, a visual grouping of five galaxies, is best known for being prominently featured in the holiday classic film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

Webb is the largest, most powerful telescope ever launched into space.

https://webbtelescope.org/contents/medi … M13FWQ881E

Stephan’s Quintet is a visual grouping of five galaxies located in the constellation Pegasus. Together, they are also known as the Hickson Compact Group 92 (HCG 92). Although called a “quintet,” only four of the galaxies are truly close together and caught up in a cosmic dance. The fifth and leftmost galaxy, called NGC 7320, is well in the foreground compared with the other four.

Tight groups like this may have been more common in the early universe when their superheated, infalling material may have fueled very energetic black holes called quasars. Even today, the topmost galaxy in the group – NGC 7319 – harbors an active galactic nucleus, a supermassive black hole 24 million times the mass of the Sun. It is actively pulling in material and puts out light energy equivalent to 40 billion Suns.

Some of the key emission lines seen by NIRSpec are shown in this image and represent different phases of gas. Atomic hydrogen, in blue and yellow, allows scientists to discover the structure of the outflow. Iron ions, in teal, trace the places where the hot gas is located. Molecular hydrogen, in red, is very cold and dense, and traces both outflowing gas and the reservoir of fuel for the black hole. The bright, active nucleus itself has been removed from these images to better show the structure of the surrounding gas.

By using NIRSpec, scientists have gained unprecedented information about the black hole and its outflow. Studying these relatively nearby galaxies helps scientists better understand galaxy evolution in the much more distant universe.

Webb reveals steamy atmosphere of exoplanet WASP-96 b, capturing the distinct signature of water along with evidence for clouds & haze — the most detailed measurements of this kind to date.
https://twitter.com/ESA_Webb/status/1546868498684583936

Behind the curtain of dust and gas in these “Cosmic Cliffs” are previously hidden baby stars, now uncovered by Webb. We know — this is a show-stopper. Just take a second to admire the Carina Nebula in all its glory: nasa.gov/webbfirstimages/
Webb’s new view gives us a rare peek into stars in their earliest, rapid stages of formation. For an individual star, this period only lasts about 50,000 to 100,000 years.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasawebbt … 211883799/
Two cameras are better than one, as seen in this combined view from Webb’s NIRCam & MIRI! In the near-infrared, we see hundreds of stars and background galaxies. Meanwhile, the mid-infrared shows us dusty planet-forming disks (in red and pink) around young stars.

The dawn of a new era in astronomy has begun as the world gets its first look at the full capabilities of the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope’s first full-colour images & spectroscopic data were released today.
https://twitter.com/ESA_Webb/status/1546877973730566146

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-12 16:48:47)

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#170 2022-07-12 12:16:19

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

more
https://webbtelescope.org/contents/media/images/

In the James Webb Space Telescope’s image of Stephan’s Quintet, we see 5 galaxies, 4 of which interact. (The left galaxy is actually in the foreground!) These colliding galaxies are pulling and stretching each other in a gravitational dance. Webb will revolutionize our knowledge of star formation and gas interactions within: nasa.gov/webbfirstimages/
Here’s Stephan’s Quintet as taken by Webb’s MIRI instrument. In the mid-infrared, Webb pierces through dust, giving new insight into how interactions like these may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasawebbt … 211586681/
This image contains one more MIRI filter than was used in the NIRCam-MIRI composite picture. The image processing specialists at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore opted to use all three MIRI filters and the colors red, green and blue to most clearly differentiate the galaxy features from each other and the shock waves between the galaxies. In this image, red denotes dusty, star-forming regions, as well as extremely distant, early galaxies and galaxies enshrouded in thick dust. Blue point sources show stars or star clusters without dust. Diffuse areas of blue indicate dust that has a significant amount of large hydrocarbon molecules. For small background galaxies scattered throughout the image, the green and yellow colors represent more distant, earlier galaxies that are rich in these hydro carbons as well.
Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

possible future release?
Director’s Discretionary Early Release Science Programs
https://www.stsci.edu/jwst/science-exec … s-programs
To realize the James Webb Space Telescope’s full science potential, it is imperative that the science community quickly learns to use its instruments and capabilities. To get the community up to speed, STScI and the JWST Advisory Committee developed the Director’s Discretionary-Early Release Science (DD-ERS) program.

and
https://webbtelescope.org/resource-gallery/images

James Webb discovers exoplanet with an atmosphere filled with water vapour (clouds)
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/godd … -in-detail

Could it find a Habitable Expoplanet with Alien Life?

PDF
https://arxiv.org/pdf/1803.04985.pdf

Atmospheric compositions are fundamental to our un- derstanding of the nature and origins of planets. For
example, the enhanced metallicities of the primary atmospheres of giant planets relative to their host stars’
abundances are a tracer of these planets’ formation histories (e.g., Owen et al. 1999). On the other hand, the
compositions of the secondary atmospheres of terrestrial planets are a record of atmospheric evolution due to
escape, geophysical, and, perhaps, biological processes
(e.g., Meadows & Seager 2010). For all planets, measuring the atmospheric composition is crucial to assessing
and understanding planetary climate, including habit-
ability.

PDF
https://www.stsci.edu/files/live/sites/ … report.pdf

Observing a bright planet and its satellites and rings was expected to be challenging, due to scattered light that may affect the science instrument employed, but also the fine guidance sensor must track guide stars
Page 8 near the bright planet. Therefore, commissioning included tests of moving target tracking with NIRCam, where Jupiter was incrementally moved from the NIRCam field of view (FOV) to the FGS-2 FOV. See
Figure 1. These observations verified the expectation that guide star acquisition works successfully as
long as Jupiter is at least 140” away from the FGS, consistent with pre-flight modeling.
The other SIs were also tested for efficiency with nearby scattered light, also using the Jupiter system. Preliminary results have measured scattered light contamination on the detectors for all instruments when the planet was not in the primary FOV, which will need to be considered for planning nearby satellite
observation

NIRCam narrow-band imaging of Jupiter, moons, and ring. PID 1022 demonstrated that JWST can track moving targets even when there is scattered light from a bright Jovian planet. At left is a NIRCam short-wavelength image in filter F212N (2.12 μm); at right is a NIRCam long-wavelength image
in filter F323N (3.23 μm). The exposure time was 75 s. The Jovian moons Europa, Thebe, and Metis are
labeled. The shadow of Europa is also visible, just to the left of the Great Red Spot. The stretch is fairly harsh to bring out the faint moons as well as Jupiter’s ring.

JWST is the product of the efforts of approximately 20,000 people in an international team.
Commissioning JWST and characterizing science performance is the result of tremendous effort by the
JWST commissioning team over the last six months. The achieved performance is the result of efforts
over the many years leading to launch by team members across much of the globe. Given the measured
performance described in this document, the JWST mission enters Cycle 1 having demonstrated that the
observatory exceeds its demanding pre-launch performance expectations. With revolutionary capabilities,
JWST has begun the first of many years of scientific discover

photo sets
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqpho … 300494194/

also
https://www.nasa.gov/webbfirstimages

video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmMRMIE3MGw

Hubble and Webb
https://gfycat.com/weakcalmboa

two arcs are the same Galaxy
https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasawebbt … 210554682/

By quickly examining the image at left by eye, it becomes clearer that one arc may be made up of two similar-looking galaxies. Their bright central regions match, despite their stretched appearances. These may be lensed galaxies – one galaxy that is mirrored in a second location. Are they the same? Researchers can’t be sure from the image alone – more data are needed to confirm a match.

Scientists do this by gathering spectra, which spread light out so they can fully examine an object’s makeup. Webb’s Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS), which gathers spectra of every object in any field it observes, was pointed at the galaxy cluster to gather more detail. A segment of the NIRISS grism image (an instrument that has a grating, or stair steps, on a prism), at center, shows how ionized oxygen and atomic hydrogen emission lines are distributed along the arc.

Next, the spectra from each of these two galaxies were plotted as graphs, shown at right, to reveal their compositions. The graphs, known as spectra, match, which indicates that these arcs are mirror images of the same galaxy. Webb’s spectra from NIRISS also quickly proved that light from both galaxies was emitted 9.3 billion years ago, further confirming they are one and the same.


https://webbtelescope.org/contents/medi … WP5ESGSFXF

Using IFUs, scientists can measure spatial structures, determine the velocity of those structures, and get a full range of spectral data. Much like medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the IFUs allow scientists to “slice and dice” the information into many images for detailed study.

MIRI’s MRS pierced through the shroud of dust near the active galactic nucleus to measure the bright emission from nearby hot gas that is being ionized by powerful winds and radiation from the black hole. The instrument saw the gas near the supermassive black hole at a level of detail never seen before, and it was able to determine its composition.

When a supermassive black hole feeds, some of the infalling material becomes very hot and is pushed away from the black hole in the form of winds and jets. MIRI probed many different regions, including the black hole’s outflowing wind – indicated by the smaller circle – and the area immediately around the black hole itself – indicated by the larger circle. It showed that the black hole is enshrouded in silicate dust similar to beach sand, but with much smaller grains.

The top spectrum, from the black hole’s outflow, shows a region filled with hot, ionized gases, including iron, argon, neon, sulfur and oxygen as denoted by the peaks at given wavelengths. The presence of multiple emission lines from the same element with different degrees of ionization is valuable for understanding the properties and origins of the outflow.

The bottom spectrum reveals that the supermassive black hole has a reservoir of colder, denser gas with large quantities of molecular hydrogen and silicate dust that absorb the light from the central regions of the galaxy.


   

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope reveals emerging stellar nurseries and individual stars in the Carina Nebula that were previously obscured
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/godd … star-birth

    Images of “Cosmic Cliffs” showcase Webb’s cameras’ capabilities to peer through cosmic dust, shedding new light on how stars form
    Objects in the earliest, rapid phases of star formation are difficult to capture, but Webb’s extreme sensitivity, spatial resolution, and imaging capability can chronicle these elusive events

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-12 13:09:01)

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#171 2022-07-12 16:56:21

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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Rare Earth?

5 Thousand Exoplanets Discovered beyond our Solar system but nothing like Earth...yet?

Each of the 141 data points (white circles) on this graph represents the amount of a specific wavelength of light that is blocked by the planet and absorbed by its atmosphere.
https://www.canada.ca/en/space-agency/n … lanet.html

Times Square
https://twitter.com/TimesSquareNYC/stat … 5912890368
Absolutely breathtaking views of the NASAWebb

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-12 17:00:15)

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#172 2022-07-12 17:46:39

SpaceNut
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#173 2022-07-12 17:58:15

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Can you find the Blackhole distorting the space image?

Light from Galaxies bend around a yet unseen undetected blackhole, we can see a much stronger visual display of bending spacetime curvature, gravitational bending light around a massive object from a distant source. Most of the gravitational lenses found in past images were fluke discoveries, in the past they have been discovered accidentally but JWST can follow up on discovery already known by space telescopes like Hubble.  Newly found gravitational lenses can also serve as light magnification tools that help astronomers to look at even more distant galaxies he gravity lenses thus acting as a natural telescope

Hubble is great but is it fair to compare a totally different machine JWST to Hubble, JWST goes beyond visual and is a multipurpose IR observatory.

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-12 18:06:50)

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#174 2022-07-12 19:08:12

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 25,992

Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

Most of the star streaks are in circular patterns, there is also a slight twist to the image as well since the hubble lower left corner does not match the lower left corner star for jwst. The same field of view is also skewed

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#175 2022-07-13 17:13:11

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 3,392

Re: James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - 6.5m mirror, L2 orbit

I bought some old Cosmology books a while back but I never really read them like I would read other science books, one time I wasn't a big fan of Fringe ideas or Cosmology I guess Hubble and things reported in news like Cern changed that but one time I thought all stuff about future tech and these futurist sciences were mostly in the far distant future or speculation. At one time I wasn't a fan of fringe Cosmology stuff I thought it was more philosophy than true 'science' but I think different now and a lot has been proven true. What is amazing in the difference between Stephan’s Quintet and SMACS-0723 from JWST is you might also expect Stephan’s Quintet to have Supermassive Blackholes at their center and to also show effects of Gravitational Lens but there is none or none that I can clearly see. I can see the collisions, the spiral arms thrown off, regions of star burst forming in the Quintet but it is only SMACS-0723 that shows this amazing lenses feature.

Science Data for Webb's First Images Now Available
https://www.stsci.edu/contents/news/jws … lable.html

Highlights Vid
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1C_zuHf6lP4

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-13 17:28:15)

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