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#76 2021-06-21 06:57:55

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 885

Re: Physics Topics

Seen as we've had discussion on Graviton or Gravity Waves I thought to post this news.

Astronomers saw the Same Supernova Three Times Thanks to Gravitational Lensing. And in Twenty Years They Think They’ll see it one More Time
https://www.universetoday.com/151581/as … more-time/

The un-cancelled LISA mission? NASA announced it would be unable to continue funding this mission

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_Int … ce_Antenna
The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. Potential sources for signals are merging massive black holes at the centre of galaxies, massive black holes orbited by small compact objects, known as extreme mass ratio inspirals, binaries of compact stars in our Galaxy, and possibly other sources of cosmological origin, such as the very early phase of the Big Bang, and speculative astrophysical objects like cosmic strings and domain boundaries.

Previous searches for gravitational waves in space were conducted for short periods by planetary missions that had other primary science objectives (such as Cassini–Huygens), using microwave Doppler tracking to monitor fluctuations in the Earth–spacecraft distance. By contrast, LISA is a dedicated mission that will use laser interferometry to achieve a much higher sensitivity. Other gravitational wave antennas, such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO 600, are already in operation on Earth, but their sensitivity at low frequencies is limited by the largest practical arm lengths, by seismic noise, and by interference from nearby moving masses. Thus, LISA and ground detectors are complementary rather than competitive, much like astronomical observatories in different electromagnetic bands (e.g., ultraviolet and infrared)

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#77 2021-06-21 09:16:42

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: Physics Topics

For Mars_B4_Moon re #76

Thanks for contributing to the Physics Topic (a) and (b) Thanks for the update on LISA !!! It is disappointing to learn that this important (as I see it) research instrument is going to have to wait for funding, but it's value seems to be recognized, so it should climb back to the top of the queue at some point.

While I'm thinking about it, thanks for all the topics you've brought back into view in recent times, and for the new items you've added to the mix.

This forum software lacks a simple way to indicate appreciation for contributions, and a post has the disadvantage of taking the author's place in the Active list.

I'll ask SpaceNut about the possibility of setting up a ThumbsUp Topic in Chat ... If we had such a thing, members could "vote" for posts without intruding on the flow of the topic.

(th)

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#78 2021-06-30 19:13:25

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: Physics Topics

I decided to toss a question into the Physics topic...

Adhesion and cohesion are properties of matter most closely associated with Chemistry, but I am interested in the Physics of the two.

Work has been done to show that Carbon can be arranged to have tensile strength nearly (but not quite) sufficient to support a space elevator above the Earth.   Apparently such an elevator can be constructed above Mars with existing materials.

However, ** this ** post is asking the question ... is adhesion potentially stronger than cohesion?

Most of the examples of answers that Google came up with have to do with water, which exhibits useful combinations of cohesion and adhesion that can be employed for various purposes.

There may be research on the power of electron bonds between atoms of various types, and I'd be interested in direction.

(th)

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#79 2021-07-01 17:55:41

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Physics Topics

The carbon bunky ball and nano tubes are the start of carbon products with graphene coming up into uses.

Carbon while it does conduct energy it is more of a resistive to its flow and disapates heat acrross its surface.

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#80 2021-07-28 13:13:47

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: Physics Topics

https://www.yahoo.com/news/youtuber-bet … 00405.html

A YouTuber bet a physicist $10,000 that a wind-powered vehicle could travel twice as fast as the wind itself - and won
Aylin Woodward
Wed, July 28, 2021, 8:01 AM

What I ** really ** like about this story is the amazing creative thinking that led to this success.

Whoever had the insight to understand the principle behind this success is right up there with Void for creative thinking!

I am tempted to feel a tiny bit badly for the PhD who was so sure of himself, but on the other hand, his (unplanned) generosity is a wonderful teaching moment for thousands if not millions of others who may suffer from mental block.

(th)

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#81 2021-08-02 16:03:38

Calliban
Member
From: Northern England, UK
Registered: 2019-08-18
Posts: 1,154

Re: Physics Topics

An economist and a physicist discuss the unsustainable nature of economic growth.  Amusing and apt.
https://dothemath.ucsd.edu/2012/04/econ … physicist/


Interested in space science, engineering and technology.

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#82 2021-09-07 09:22:49

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: Physics Topics

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/150- … 00248.html

A 150-Year Old Idea Could Lead To A Breakthrough In Space Travel
Editor OilPrice.com
Mon, September 6, 2021, 8:00 PM

According to Woodward, you can generate ~10 newtons of force for every kilowatt of electricity fed into the Mach Effect engines. Early applications would be in satellites used in chemical rockets to maintain orbits and alignment with the engines fueled by electricity, vastly extending their useful lifespans. Indeed, in this case, solar panels could provide all the necessary energy to power the drives.

Another interesting finding: The team has calculated that the smaller the device, the larger the force it can generate. So instead of scaling up, they hope that arrays of thousands of tiny MEGA Drives powered by a nuclear battery could one day be deployed to accelerate large probes into interstellar space. Indeed, the scientists claim that the drives are sufficient to power a human-crewed starship to nearby stars such as Proxima Centauri located some 4.25 light-years away from the sun and back in some reasonable fraction of the human lifetime.

This is the best writing I've seen so far on the subject.

The writer may not be a native English speaker.  The English is excellent, but I question the term "moot" when used with respect to atomic energy as a source of electricity.  However, the context may be the size of objects that might use this tool.  If objects are small, then solar panels for satellite positioning might make sense, and I would imagine that is where early funds to support further research may focus.

(th)

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#83 2021-09-07 13:46:22

Calliban
Member
From: Northern England, UK
Registered: 2019-08-18
Posts: 1,154

Re: Physics Topics

TH: this is a fascinating topic (The Mach effect drive).  Definitely one to follow.  I don't quite understand the theory behind it, but it appears to be a propellantless propulsion concept, though not strictly reactionless.  If it can provide constant thrust irrespective of speed, then it is essentially a perpetual motion machine, because kinetic energy scales with v^2.  The energy would presumably have to come from somewhere, but apparently human beings don't have to pay for it.


Interested in space science, engineering and technology.

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#84 2021-09-07 14:05:33

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,326

Re: Physics Topics

For Calliban re #83

Thank you for commenting upon the article before you've had a chance to read it.  After you've read it, please  come back and share your insight.

The argument ** appears ** to be that the rest of the Universe participates in the process, and that the invention (if that's the right word) is a way of increasing the density (mass?) of matter when we pull on it, and decreasing the density (mass?) of matter when we push on it.  Apparently (and I am looking forward to correction as necessary) the process is very similar to the financial process used by major players with powerful computers who are able to catch tiny movements of stock price when they fall (so buy them) and then release (sell) when the price is infinitesimally greater.

I am told by FriendOfQuark1 that it is possible to live on the proceeds of activity along these lines.

(th)

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#85 2021-09-09 06:22:26

Calliban
Member
From: Northern England, UK
Registered: 2019-08-18
Posts: 1,154

Re: Physics Topics

An interview with James Woodward here, that explains the concept in more detail.
https://medium.com/predict/james-woodwa … 384863ad50


Interested in space science, engineering and technology.

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