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#1 2005-09-30 10:52:10

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

While I have seen this before I was unable to get a search return for it.
hf_nasa_marssat0930_01.jpg

NASA Grant Energizes Student-Developed Mars Project


The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Program announced September 21 that they have received a $200,000 NASA advanced projects development grant. The funding will support development of a full payload engineering model, as well as make possible a number of tasks that push the project nearer to a real-time liftoff.

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Program is the first ever mission to study the effects of Martian gravity on mammals, a fundamental step moving humans out beyond low Earth orbit to the red planet.

Yup a much needed level of research for living in reduced gravity of mars.

the five-week mission is designed to carry out the first in-depth study of how mammals adapt to a reduced-gravity environment. Data from this mission and its successors will be essential in determining future possibilities for human space treks outward from Earth.

While we have had simular discusions for the use of the ISS to investigate such lose of bone due to 0g little research has been done for reduce levels of gravity.

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#2 2005-09-30 12:03:22

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

While I have seen this before I was unable to get a search return for it.

*I just now saw the article at space.com, and your thread (this) is the only return with Search for "Biosatellite".

Mice in spaaaaaaace, huh?  Lol! 

Am glad NASA's involved ($200,000 grant).  Over 400 students in dozens of universities and high schools are participating.  smile

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite will carry a small population of mice to low Earth orbit aboard a spinning spacecraft creating "artificial gravity" identical to that on the Martian surface.

Good luck to them (mice and students).  big_smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#3 2005-10-02 20:06:35

Josh Cryer
Administrator
Registered: 2001-09-29
Posts: 3,830

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

This is VERY similar to the Translife Project, actually. I wonder if the same people working on this were working on Translife, I should hope so.


Some useful links while MER are active. Offical site NASA TV JPL MER2004 Text feed
--------
The amount of solar radiation reaching the surface of the earth totals some 3.9 million exajoules a year.

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#4 2006-07-17 11:00:05

adriaan
Banned
Registered: 2006-07-17
Posts: 1

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

I think this was the translife project.
www.marsgravity.org
It is an extremely student-run project; 95% of the people at the MIT program site are under 25; three of them are high school students.

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#5 2007-01-31 08:04:14

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

Space Show interview with the team developing the satellite

Launch is now scheduled for mid 2010 on a SpaceX Falcon 1.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#6 2007-01-31 09:19:12

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

Well at least it is going to launch...

It is an important experiment since we will want to eventually take animals to mars someday.

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#7 2007-01-31 13:17:08

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

Well at least it is going to launch...

It is an important experiment since we will want to eventually take animals to mars someday.

It's even more important in that it adds a critical data point between 0 and 1 g for adaptation and bone loss studies.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#8 2008-03-17 08:31:21

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

Wow went searching for the project only to find 2 threads that it happened to be mentioned in but the kicker was this project was originally started by Mars Society under the Translife Project.
The artificial gravity project planned to simulate the effects of Martian gravity on animals.

This project is still alive but it no longer goes under the translife moniker or at least the resurected portion as commited to be MIT as Bio Satellite.


Hi everyone, just updating this section, if you check out our front page you will see we have taken our first step in supporting this important project, it's official! http://marsdrive.com/about-marsdrive/ma … llite.html

MarsDrive is pleased to announced that we have secured a place on the MarsGravity BioSatellite spacecraft for our logo to be launched in 2010. We would like to thank our supporters whose contributions have made this possible and will be setting a fund raising goal of $8000 for further support for this most important project in the next 12 months. If you would like to help us take this next big step you can donate by pressing the paypal button here. You can also find our logo at the "Your Name Into Space" website here. http://www.yournameintospace.org/current_sponsors.php

http://www.marsgravity.org/main/
The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Project is a ground-breaking undertaking to study the effects of Martian gravity on mammals. We are taking the first step towards human missions to Mars - and beyond. Data from this mission will make a significant contribution to our understanding of fundamental space biology and greatly advance human space exploration.

We still want to raise the larger amount of $8000 but this is a start. We think it's entirely appropriate for a Mars based group to have a big part in this experiment, and while individuals can give to that project directly we believe it's a great opportunity to bring the public focus back onto why this mission is being done at all- the colonization of Mars.

Just did a search on Mars Gravity Biosat to see where this came in when googling and it was number 6 on the list but all that aside 

gravitybiosat.jpg

http://www.marsgravity.org/main/

Something of interest if you have the skill is; 

The Mars Gravity Team is currently seeking interested students of all levels of experience to become involved with the project. Opportunities exist in engineering, science, management, business development, and educational outreach.

Here are some more details on the mission and the satelite as well.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/mars … llite.html

The project is expected to cost about $15 million plus the cost of the launch. The teams have received more than $400,000 for building the spacecraft from a variety of sources including NASA, the three universities, and a number of private companies and individuals. The teams have also secured commitments to cover approximately half the cost of the $6 million launch.


Inside view

mars-biosatellite2.jpg


As Frank indicated Your tax-deductible transaction will support America's most ambitious student spacecraft, an initiative of MIT and Georgia Tech.

MarsDrive is in the Bronze status
http://www.yournameintospace.org/current_sponsors.php

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#9 2008-03-23 07:49:15

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

I posted the topic to other forums and after seeing no responses I made the update in the form of a couple of questions.

So no one thinks that gravity over the duration of a human Mars journey is of any consequence to the safety or life conditions of the crew.

For me it is still a question of finding what level is required as we know that 0G does have a big effect over a full duration mission period that we would see for humans to Mars.

Or is it that giving money for these causes individually is the issue for what is needed to be answered before going?

Again if I had the money it would be given so since I can not I put forth my time to talk about such things.

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#10 2021-07-18 08:44:32

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

bump found the topic which needs to be moved

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#11 2021-07-18 08:45:43

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 22,652

Re: Mars Gravity Biosatellite

move complete from unmanned probes

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