New Mars Forums

Official discussion forum of The Mars Society and MarsNews.com

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Announcement: As a reader of NewMars forum, we have opportunities for you to assist with technical discussions in several initiatives underway. NewMars needs volunteers with appropriate education, skills, talent, motivation and generosity of spirit as a highly valued member. Write to newmarsmember * gmail.com to tell us about your ability's to help contribute to NewMars and become a registered member.

#26 2021-05-08 10:55:46

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

This is a follow up on Post #16

The book arrived today ... first impression: "Hefty"  ... Glossy cover ... fine print ... plenty of references ... No mention of NewMars.com ... probably not surprising, but disappointing that 20 years of discussion did not yield at least ** one ** mention in a publication of the Mars Society.

To be continued:

SearchTerm:BookReview of Mars City Competition
SearchTerm:Review of Book of Mars City Competition
SearchTerm:City Million Mars Society Competition

(th)

Offline

#27 2021-05-13 09:35:58

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

New item in the mailbox:

MARS SOCIETY ANNOUNCEMENT
View this email in your browser

Final Mission Summary
Crew 235 (NASA Spaceward Bound Utah)
Mars Desert Research Station

The following is the final summary report of Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Crew 235, consisting of educators involved in NASA's Spaceward Bound Utah program.

Generally Speaking, This is How It Went

By Thomas Quayle (Science Lion Simba) and Jen Carver-Hunter

Mission Summary:

At the start of our mission, nine strangers came together with different hopes and expectations, all with the same end goal – come together with other like-minded individuals within the education community and emerge with new skills or ideas. Amazingly, every step of our journey together built the outcome that would meet and exceed everyone’s expectations.

Many of the crew interactions and experiences have been recorded in the journal reports that have been submitted each day of the mission. This report will focus on the accomplishment of our mission goals, which included completing a microbiology experiment and geologic fieldwork for collection, comparison, and analysis.

For our microbiology experiment, crew prepared agar, which they used to grow the fungi and bacteria that were swabbed from different areas inside the Hab. After allowing the specimens to incubate for 3 days, crew sorted and categorized the agar to identify the locations that were swabbed. This was done in a blind categorization so both crew teams approached it through flexible problem solving. The first team used a matrix system for identification while the second team used process of elimination and benchmarks to identify the tested locations for each sample. Every crew member felt the microbiology experiment was a success in that it would be transferable to a K-12 classroom environment.

For our geologic fieldwork experience, crew members used a presentation about Mars geology by Dr. Shannon Rupert as a spring board for identification of MDRS rock samples that represent the geology of Mars. We then used 3 EVAs over the next 3 days to collect rock samples we will use to create our MDRS-Mars rock collections. On the first EVAs, crew members traveled to Kissing Camels Ridge and followed the ridge to the west to collect petrified wood, which we were using as an analogous sample for the sulphur located on Mars. Crew members were delighted to find a diverse variety of samples, including a wide range of colors and textures.

All crew members agree that each facet of our experience at MDRS contributed to a successful mission. In addition to completing our science goals, we were able to complete all of our Sim goals as well as our collaboration/networking and teambuilding goals. We are grateful for the opportunity to learn and grow in this once-in-a-lifetime experience. Our lives are changed for the better, and we are all eager to return to our classrooms to share our week of Sim on Mars. In addition, we will continue working with Dr. Rupert to develop curriculum and materials that will allow MDRS to reach teachers far beyond the scope of the Spaceward Bound Utah program.


The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

(th)

Offline

#28 2021-05-13 09:38:50

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

For anyone thinking about designing a mission to Mars ... I note that the report above is #235

There is some overlap of membership of crews at these "missions", but never-the-less, the Mars Society is accumulating a substantial number of "veterans", some of whom might be interested in considering the real thing, or at least providing feedback to the designer to try to increase chances of success.

(th)

Offline

#29 2021-05-16 14:39:11

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

Received 2021/05/16

MARS SOCIETY ANNOUNCEMENT
View this email in your browser

NASA’s Chris McKay to Talk Terraforming at 2021 Mars Society Convention

Dr. Chris McKay, a senior planetary scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center and one of the co-founders of the Mars Underground, will give a virtual address at the 24th Annual International Mars Society Convention, scheduled for October 14-17, about the concept of terraforming the planet Mars.

A renowned astrobiologist and expert on planetary atmospheres and terraforming, Dr. McKay’s research focuses primarily on the evolution of the solar system and the origins of life. He is also involved in planning future Mars missions, including the human exploration of the Red Planet.

Over the years, he has been actively engaged in polar and desert research, having traveled to the Antarctic Dry Valleys, the Atacama Desert, Siberia, the Namib Desert and the Arctic to conduct research in these Mars-like environments.

Dr. McKay has also served as a Co-Investigator on the Titan Huygen’s probe, the Mars Phoenix lander and the Mars Science lander. He received his Ph.D. in AstroGeophysics from the University of Colorado and has authored or co-authored over 50 scientific articles on a variety of space-related subjects.

This year’s virtual Mars Society conference will be free of charge (although donations are welcomed). For full registration details, please click here. Regular updates, including a list of confirmed speakers, will be posted in the coming weeks on the Mars Society web site and its social media platforms.


The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Offline

#30 2021-05-17 02:11:13

Rxke
Member
From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,664

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

I love McKay's eternal enthusiasm.

Offline

#31 2021-05-19 17:31:47

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

More about the 2021 Convention ...


MARS SOCIETY ANNOUNCEMENT
View this email in your browser

Interstellar Lab CEO Barbara Belvisi to Speak at 2021 Mars Society Convention

Barbara Belvisi, CEO & founder of Interstellar Lab, Inc., will give a virtual plenary address about her company and its mission at the 24th Annual International Mars Society Convention, scheduled for October 14-17, 2021.

Established in 2018 and located in Los Angeles and Paris, Interstellar Lab develops bio-regenerative modules and life-support solutions to make human life sustainable on Earth, Mars and throughout the solar system.

Ms. Belvisi started her career as an investment manager in a FoF management company, then moved on to private equity and finally venture capital, raising over $80 million. At the age of 28, she left to focus on her passion: science and technology. As part of this, she helped launch The Family, a Paris-based incubator, and Hello Tomorrow, an event fostering scientific innovation.

In addition, she established her own asset management firm, Elephants & Ventures, in 2013, which led to the founding of Hardware Club in 2015, a hybrid fund that focuses on robotics, hardware and IT.

This year’s virtual Mars Society conference will be free of charge (although donations are welcomed). For full registration details, please click here. Regular updates, including a list of confirmed speakers, will be posted in the coming weeks on the Mars Society web site and its social media platforms.

The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Offline

#32 2021-05-27 12:01:12

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

MARS SOCIETY ANNOUNCEMENT
View this email in your browser

Support the Mars Society When You Shop

Shop at AmazonSmile to support the Mars Society's efforts to educate the public, the media and government on the benefits of exploring Mars and creating a permanent human presence on the Red Planet.

It’s the same Amazon.com you know - the same products, the same prices, the same services - and 0.5% of each eligible online purchase you make is donated to the Mars Society.

For full details about the AmazonSmile program, please visit: https://amzn.to/3bWxAmq.

Thanks for your support & on to Mars!
   
The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Offline

#33 2021-06-08 12:44:30

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

Robots Are No Substitute For Human Space Exploration (Blog)

By Evan Plant-Weir, Senior Writer, Red Planet Bound Blog

Space exploration is not just about gathering data.

By and large, the last few hundred days on Earth are not going to be remembered fondly. Few will recall the COVID-19 years with a sense of happy nostalgia. Ultimately, however, this time won’t be entirely defined by the beating we took at the hands of a pandemic. Despite the many tragedies and challenges therein, we still managed to pull off some pretty remarkable things.

Somewhere high on that list is the recent trifecta success in the robotic exploration of Mars.

In February, spacecraft from three nations reached Mars in close succession. Since then, these missions have collectively knocked it out of the park with a series of impressive firsts.

NASA – now a seasoned veteran of robotic Mars exploration – amazed us with the first controlled flight and audio recording on another planet. As if that’s not enough, their Perseverance rover converted Martian atmosphere into oxygen for the first time (an important prerequisite for Mars settlement).

With Al-Amal, the UAE became the first Arab nation to establish a scientific presence at Mars, achieving that milestone on their opening attempt.

The arrival of Tianwen-1 marks China’s inaugural visit to the red planet, and the only time that a nation has deployed an orbiter, lander and rover during their first successful mission to Mars.

We’re getting good at this.

In fact, we’re getting so good at sending robot explorers to the red planet that you may begin to wonder… why would we ever bother sending humans? Why trouble with the expense and risk of transporting squishy hominids when we can just send metal and silicone instead?

It is difficult to overstate the scientific and societal importance of robotic space exploration. Each of these orbiters, landers and rovers have value in and of themselves, but they are nowhere near the culmination of our potential.

These robotic forerunners are laying the groundwork for their human successors, whose capacity for science and exploration is not only vastly broader, but substantively deeper.

The human body is a far superior mechanical system for generalized planetary exploration. Our brains, too, are uniquely suited for the investigation of Mars because of one vital capacity that no rover can carry, and no communications satellite can transmit: direct conscious experience.

To read the full blog, please click here.

https://www.marssociety.org/red-planet- … 1d542e4e31

The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Offline

#34 2021-06-09 14:09:13

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

Planetary Geologist Henrik Hargitai to Talk about Mapping Mars at Virtual Mars Society Convention

The Mars Society is pleased to announce that Dr. Henrik Hargitai, a planetary geologist and mapping expert at NASA’s Ames Research Center, will give a virtual presentation about mapping the Red Planet at the 24th Annual International Mars Society Convention, set for October 14-17, 2021.

Dr. Hargitai is involved in a post-doctoral fellow at the NASA’s Ames Research Center and the NASA Astrobiology Institute, focusing on planetary cartography, fluvial geomorphology and the history and localization of planetary nomenclature.

Earlier this year, Dr. Hargitai edited a 60-page comprehensive atlas of the Red planet entitled, “Mars 36: Pocket Atlas”, the first of its kind that presents a planetary surface with physical geographic thematic layers. Landforms created by lava, wind, water, and ice are shown in the book on a topographic base map.

In addition, Dr. Hargitai served for several years as the chair of the ICA Commission on Planetary Cartography and participated in two crewed simulations at the Mars Society’s Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in southern Utah. He is also the producer of numerous public outreach programs in planetary science for the media.

Dr. Hargitai received a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences (Physical Geography) and a Ph.D. in Philosophy (Aesthetics) from the Eötvös Loránd University, as well as Master’s degrees in Geography, Communications, and Teaching of Geography from the same university.

This year’s virtual Mars Society conference will be free of charge (although donations are welcomed). For full registration details, please click here. Regular updates, including a list of confirmed speakers, will be posted in the coming weeks on the Mars Society web site and its social media platforms.

The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Offline

#35 Yesterday 12:02:48

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 6,070

Re: How's the Society doing right now?

Virtual University Rover Challenge 2021 Gets Teams Roving

Although the COVID-19 global health pandemic forced the cancellation of the URC2021 Finals, many teams and their rovers were still anxious to test their capabilities and showcase their hard work. The URC staff developed a special event just for this situation: the Virtual University Rover Challenge 2021.

The Virtual University Rover Challenge 2021 offered teams the opportunity to build courses on their own campuses, and compete remotely with judges and fans tuning in online from around the world. Three URC missions were modified for this format: the Equipment Servicing Mission, Autonomous Navigation Mission, and Extreme Retrieval and Delivery Mission. 13 teams from 5 countries were able to compete June 3-6, with all sessions live streamed (and now archived!) via the URC YouTube Channel.

Each team's competition experience was unique - operating on test hardware that they built, and from their own campuses. Judges were fortunate enough to go on a virtual world tour, with the opportunity to see each team operating in their home environments. While the virtual event was no replacement for the URC Finals, this was a tremendous opportunity to see passionate students and their rovers hard at work again!

Equipment Servicing Mission

The Equipment Servicing Mission required teams to perform a series of dexterous manipulation tasks, operating equipment that is typically designed for a human. This includes opening a drawer, placing a toolbox in that drawer, and closing it; typing a command on a keyboard; and turning a screw to tighten it. MIST Mongol Barota from the Military Institute of Science & Technology in Bangladesh achieved the only perfect score of this mission.

To read the full announcement, (visit Mars Society web site)

Live video of Session 2 of Virtual University Rover Challenge 2021

The Mars Society
11111 West 8th Avenue, unit A
Lakewood, CO 80215 U.S.A.
www.marssociety.org
https://www.facebook.com/TheMarsSociety
@TheMarsSociety

Copyright (c) 2021 The Mars Society
All rights reserved.

(th)

Last edited by tahanson43206 (Yesterday 12:03:41)

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB