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#1 2021-01-31 19:41:07

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,078

Brunswick-based bluShift Aerospace launches prototype rocket

Just happened on this....
Maine company successfully launches prototype rocket


Brunswick-based bluShift Aerospace launched a 20-foot (6-meter) prototype rocket, hitting an altitude of a little more than 4,000 feet (1,219 meters) in a first run designed to test the rocket's propulsion and control systems.

It carried a science project by Falmouth High School students that will measure flight metrics such as barometric pressure, a special alloy that's being tested by a New Hampshire company — and a Dutch dessert called stroopwafel, in an homage to its Amsterdam-based parent company. Brunswick-based bluShift Aerospace launched a 20-foot (6-meter) prototype rocket, hitting an altitude of a little more than 4,000 feet (1,219 meters) in a first run designed to test the rocket's propulsion and control systems.

It carried a science project by Falmouth High School students that will measure flight metrics such as barometric pressure, a special alloy that's being tested by a New Hampshire company — and a Dutch dessert called stroopwafel, in an homage to its Amsterdam-based parent company.

Gee first peep of this company... wow

The company, which launched from the northern Maine town of Limestone, the site of the former Loring Air Force Base, is one of dozens racing to find affordable ways to launch so-called nano satellites. Some of them, called Cube-Sats, can be as small as 10 centimeters by 10 centimeters.
“We are going to be the Uber to space, where we carry one, two or three payloads profitably.”

Another aspect that makes bluShift's rocket different is its hybrid propulsion system.

It relies on a solid fuel and a liquid oxidizer passing either through or around the solid fuel; the result is a simpler, more affordable system than a liquid fuel-only rocket,

Bio fuel so it ecological safe for the environment.

The goal is to create a small rocket that could launch a 30-kilogram (66-pound) payload into low-Earth orbit, more than 100 miles (160 kilometers) above Earth's surface. Lockman said orbit could be possible by 2024.

The company has spent $800,000 on research and development, with some of the money coming from NASA.

Wow small packages to orbit...

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