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#1 2003-12-19 15:39:29

Rxke
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From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,669

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

There's been talk about doing tests with pressure vats containing lichen, algea etc,

... to gradually change the pressure and atmospheric composition, radiation... towards Mars analog state.

But have there been real tests done, so far?

(Important to know how to build a 'minimal requirements'  greenhouse, capable of- oxgen/soil/compost generation...)

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#2 2018-09-26 16:55:19

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Not only a very old topic but no post?

Here is a posted content from another topic that applies:

M-Albion-3D wrote:

http://scratchpad.wikia.com/wiki/Lichens_as_food

There are records of lichens being used as food by many different human cultures across the world. Lichens are eaten by people in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa, and perhaps elsewhere. Often lichens are merely famine foods eaten in times of dire needs, but in some cultures lichens are a staple food or even a delicacy. Two problems often encountered with eating lichens is that they usually contain mildly toxic secondary compounds, and that lichen polysaccharides are generally indigestible to humans. Many human cultures have discovered preparation techniques to overcome these problems. Lichens are often thoroughly washed, boiled, or soaked in ash water to help remove secondary compounds.

In the past Iceland moss (Cetraria islandica) was an important human food in northern Europe and Scandinavia, and was cooked in many different ways, such as bread, porridge, pudding, soup, or salad. Wila (Bryoria fremontii) was an important food in parts of North America, where it was usually pitcooked. It is even featured in a Secwepemc story. Reindeer lichen (Cladina spp.) is a staple food of reindeer and caribou in the Arctic. Northern peoples in North America and Siberia traditionally eat the partially digested lichen after they remove it from the rumen of caribou that have been killed. It is often called 'stomach icecream'. Rock tripe (Umbilicaria spp. and Lasalia spp.) is a lichen that has frequently been used as an emergency food in North America. One species of Umbilicaria, Iwa-take (U. esculenta), is used in a variety of traditional Korean and Japanese foods. It is quite expensive, and is collected off the sides of cliffs. In India, and other centers of curry powder production, garam masala sauce contains certain lichens used as bulking agents.

Very few lichens are poisonous. Poisonous lichens include those high in vulpinic acid or usnic acid. Most (but not all) lichens that contain vulpinic acid are yellow, so any yellow lichen should be considered to be potentially poisonous.

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#3 2018-09-26 16:58:13

SpaceNut
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Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

One of the earliest plants that populated earth and is still around even after all of what has happened to earth.

This does sound like they should be an early one to take along to mars.

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#4 2018-09-26 23:10:50

Belter
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Registered: 2018-09-13
Posts: 184

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

This bacteria might prove useful, though I'm not clear what the final byproduct is of it eating iron oxides.

https://www.nature.com/articles/416767a

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#5 2018-09-26 23:12:04

Belter
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Posts: 184

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

If we can find or build a microbe that can liberate oxygen from the Martian dust we'd be on to something, even if it had to take place in temperature controlled domes for a few hundred years.

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#6 2018-09-27 15:34:58

IanM
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From: Chicago
Registered: 2015-12-14
Posts: 276

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Lichens are essentially "fungi that have discovered agriculture", being a colony of fungi and cyanobacteria or algae. As such, I think they should be avoided at first since some of the organic material might be wasted on the fungal part. However, cyanobacteria, algae, and land plants (embryophytes) all have roughly similar photosynthetic efficiency, so it doesn't quite matter which ones we use for organic material, although I would think cyanobacteria and algae are more resilient towards the cold.


The Earth is the cradle of the mind, but one cannot live in a cradle forever. -Paraphrased from Tsiolkovsky

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#7 2018-10-27 13:31:36

jfenciso
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From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 89
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Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Currently, I am working my research about effects of biofertilizer in crops under cadmium stress. Remember, there is a presence of cadmium  based on the study about Martian meteorite. smile

Last edited by jfenciso (2018-10-27 13:33:36)


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. Graduate of Master of Science in Botany at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. I am specializing in Plant Physiology, and have a minor degree in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#8 2018-10-27 15:09:27

SpaceNut
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Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/can-plants … mars-soil/

Abstract on Cadmium in plants on polluted soils: Effects of soil factors, hyperaccumulation, and amendments

dge.carnegiescience.edu/SCOPE/SCOPE_31/SCOPE_31_2.05_Chapter10_119-146.pdf

https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/1314g/report.pdf

Scientists Grow Vegetables On “Martian” Soil; Believe We Won’t Die From Eating Them

Martian soil is dense in heavy metals like cadmium and lead, which can be absorbed by plants, and can make their fruits and vegetables toxic.

The new research found scientists growing rye, tomatoes, radishes, and peas in an artificial Mars-like soil, a soil created with identical concentrations of those heavy metals as is found on Mars. According to a press release from the university, testing of those crops found no unsafe levels of those heavy metals in the edible harvest.

We are going to test the soils and hopefully select the lowest levels of these contents to make use of in our greenhouse.

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#9 2018-10-27 23:46:10

jfenciso
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From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 89
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Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Most studies, crops are accumulators. We need to look a variety which has an ability to exclude the heavy metals in soil. Second, I am screening a biofertilizer developed by the university where I study, and to choose which types of biofertilizer will be used for plant thrive in cadmium-rich soil.

By the way, once you find soils which have the lowest levels of Cd, try to correlate your results with simulated Martian regolith that we have. Maybe someday, that's a new type of simulated Martian soil. Are you a soil scientist? smile


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. Graduate of Master of Science in Botany at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. I am specializing in Plant Physiology, and have a minor degree in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#10 2018-10-27 23:53:45

jfenciso
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From: Philippines
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Posts: 89
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Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

SpaceNut, thank you for sharing the link from USGS Report. I will use this material for my literature review. More thank you to you. smile


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. Graduate of Master of Science in Botany at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. I am specializing in Plant Physiology, and have a minor degree in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#11 2018-10-28 09:50:48

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

I am a general arm chair scientist no speciality, more of a engineering janitor rather than a PhD in anything.

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#12 2018-10-28 09:54:01

jfenciso
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From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 89
Website

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Even you have a higher degree or not, our aim is to share our thoughts on how to colonize or terraform the planet Mars as a second home planet for the future generation. smile


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. Graduate of Master of Science in Botany at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. I am specializing in Plant Physiology, and have a minor degree in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#13 2018-10-28 20:12:56

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Earth current experiments for algea have been to create oil products from the growth to which on mars we could still use this as it would provide another means to make fuels for rockets.

https://btiscience.org/wp-content/uploa … l-2015.pdf

www.cosee.net/files/coseenet/AffectofCarbonDioxideonAlgaeGrowth2.pdf

for food I think I posted a recipe for making brownies in another topic....

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#14 2018-10-28 20:19:03

SpaceNut
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#15 2018-10-29 05:09:57

jfenciso
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From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 89
Website

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Working an algae as source of fuels takes more time to do the study. That is the reason why we don't have an established alternative fuel, to avoid the utilization of fossil fuel. Maybe, through genetic engineerting, this could help to develop a high quality of fuel.


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. Graduate of Master of Science in Botany at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. I am specializing in Plant Physiology, and have a minor degree in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#16 2020-12-08 19:08:36

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

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#17 2020-12-09 08:05:01

tahanson43206
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Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,142

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Work ** has ** been done.  This topic is a good place for forum members to report it.

In the past month or so, posts have been delivered to the forum about work done showing that live algae is edible in a space mission simulation.

If anyone is interested in learning more about the presentation given on this subject, it is possible to find it by searching for the North Houston chapter of the National Space Society and refining the search to find the presentation on algae.

Information about the presenter and the research are available for review on the web site of the North Houston chapter of the National Space Society.

(th)

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#18 2022-09-13 05:51:11

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

The Potential of Pioneer Lichens in Terraforming Mars
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs … 61990.ch21

older 2018 article (subscription paywall)

Why lichen may be the perfect factories for making rocket fuel on Mars
https://www.newscientist.com/article/21 … l-on-mars/

hen the first humans go to Mars, they may want to bring lichens with them. Because lichens are mini-ecosystems made of both fungi and algae or bacteria, they are particularly good at surviving the extreme conditions on Mars, and could even be used to produce rocket fuel in space.

Lift-off for lichen: Simple moss-like growth could be the solution to space travel woes by creating rocket fuel on Mars

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech … space.html

Hydrogen is a key component in rocket fuel and scientists have found that lichens may be able to survive on the surface of Mars and other alien planets. 

Scientists believe that these simple, moss-like growths could be taken on space journeys of the future to produce hydrogen while travelling to refill fuel reserves.

The research simulated the conditions on Mars, with low oxygen, no water and temperatures as low as -196°C (-321°F).

Lichens managed to survive the unfathomably harsh environment and rebound back to full health after such brutal conditions.

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#19 2022-09-13 21:18:36

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Nature is funny with how fast it can grow based on energy input when protected.

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#20 2022-09-22 03:46:25

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Cyanobacteria from Extreme Deserts to Space
https://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInfo … erID=38613

Lichens in the Desert

https://opuntiads.com/oblog/lichens-in-the-desert/

Desert lichens grow very slowly because they are limited by extreme conditions. They become dormant in extreme heat, drought, or cold. Though some lichens can grow several inches tall, desert lichens may be only 1 mm in height. Lichens in deserts often form colorful crusts on rocks. Lichens can grow in rocks, soils, and even on plants. Though they may grow on plants, lichens are not parasites.

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#21 2022-10-04 00:46:06

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Crumpled Tarpaper Lichen (Collema coniophilum): recovery strategy 2022
https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-cl … -2022.html
a Canadian endemic species , that is found over a relatively large range, but sparsely within a specific habitat. The species is found in nutrient rich sites in humid old growth forests on a diverse range of host trees. Sixteen populations are currently known to be extant in British Columbia.

Edible food wrap made of algae explores sustainable packaging solutions
https://packagingeurope.com/news/edible … 97.article

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#22 2022-10-09 16:14:12

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Symbiotic Lichen organisms containing both algae and fungi.

Lunar Biosphere
https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/ … phere.html

Usnea is a genus of mostly pale grayish-green fruticose lichens that grow like leafless mini-shrubs or tassels anchored on bark or twigs.  The genus is in the family Parmeliaceae. It grows all over the world. Members of the genus are commonly called old man's beard, beard lichen, or beard moss.
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fu … 1654-3#%20

Revealing the world of cryptogams
https://www.csiro.au/en/research/plants … Bryophytes
Our research is leading to a better understanding of the world of cryptogams, tiny and ancient organisms like lichens and bryophytes.

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#23 2022-10-18 08:19:09

Mars_B4_Moon
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Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

Chile's distant paradise where scientists study climate change
https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/2 … ate-change

The ethnobotanical Omora park is home to an immense variety of lichens, mosses and fungi that scientists study


A food some ate during famine, the Bryoria fremontii "tree hair lichen", "black tree lichen", or "edible horsehair"  on larch the Laryx eastern Washington Lichen. This is the most widely used edible lichen in North America. In some traditional societies it was a delicacy other times it was only eaten during starvation and hunger, some Lichen with a bright yellow-green colour and growing in Europe and western North America contains a yellow chemical called vulpinic acid, which is poisonous to mammals, it would be mixed with bait meat to kill animals like the Wolf that would prey upon sheep or young cattle.

Lichens of Antarctica and South Georgia
https://www.cambridge.org/bj/academic/s … nd-ecology

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#24 2022-11-13 20:04:19

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 29,310

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

No need to experiment when you have a working model.
Honda's Microscopic CO2 Fighter Can Eliminate The Effects of 20,000 Civics

AA142d26.img?w=534&h=356&m=6

thin tanks of a green goo positioned on top of one of its buildings, being fed carbon dioxide (CO2) through a bubbling tube, absorbing sun and producing oxygen. It's a test bed for a genetically engineered microalgae that is Honda's newest ally in the battle against climate change.

It's called Dreamo and it can permanently capture CO2 and convert it to food and dietary supplements, biofuel, or a bioplastic. The process is carbon negative with one gram of the self-replicating algae absorbing two grams of CO2.

Honda bought the parent strain of Dreamo, officially called UTEX-90 after being created in a University of Texas lab. Honda then developed it further to work in a wider range of temperatures using the least energy input. Honda's version grows five times faster than the original strain and can multiply 32 times per day.

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#25 2022-11-13 20:16:28

tahanson43206
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Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,142

Re: Current experiments on algea, lichen etc.? - Anybody doing this stuff

For SpaceNut re #24

Great find! Thanks for posting the image and the link with text!

I wonder how well this system would work on Mars?

I wonder what other nutrients are needed beside CO2?

Neat connection to the University of Texas!

(th)

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