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#1 2004-07-19 07:32:59

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Two proposals:  Jupiter & Luna

*I'm particularly interested in the "Juno" proposal:

"...a mission that would orbit Jupiter from pole to pole for the first time to conduct an in-depth study of the giant planet...

+ "Juno," Dr Scott Bolton, Principal Investigator, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

This investigation proposes to use a highly instrumented spacecraft placed in a polar orbit about the planet Jupiter to investigate the existence of an ice-rock core, determine the global water and ammonia abundances in Jupiter's atmosphere, study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere, investigate the origin of the jovian magnetic field, and explore the polar magnetosphere."

"Each proposal will now receive up to $1.2 million to conduct a seven-month implementation feasibility study focused on cost, management and technical plans, including educational outreach and small business involvement."

*The chosen mission must be ready for launch by June 30, 2010 and must have a cost cap of $700 million.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#2 2004-08-05 05:19:35

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

More on "Juno" proposal

*Contrary to the title, though, the Lunar proposal is still under consideration (according to the last couple of paragraphs).  But then I'm not yet fully awake...  :-\ 

+The SwRI instruments, JADE (Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment) and Alice, are part of the proposed "Juno" mission to orbit Jupiter.

+The Juno mission will provide the critical information needed to understand how the solar system's largest planet, Jupiter, formed several billion years ago and how it interacts with the solar wind even today...

+JADE is designed to measure the auroral electron and ion populations along the planet's magnetic field lines and determine what particle populations create the jovian aurora. "The JADE experiment allows us to make the first direct measurements of the particles that create Jupiter's stunning auroral displays,"...

+The Alice instrument is designed to image ultraviolet emissions from the jovian aurora, which will allow space scientists to relate these auroral observations with JADE observations of the particle populations that create them. "The Alice instrument on Juno will provide Hubble-like images of Jupiter's powerful and dynamic aurora, but from the much better vantage points of directly above the north and south poles,"...

*My mouth is watering!   :laugh:

--Cindy

P.S.:  "Each proposal team now receives up to $1.2 million to conduct a seven-month feasibility study focused on cost, management and technical plans. NASA expects to select one of the mission proposals for full development in May 2005 as the second New Frontiers mission, for a June 2009 launch."

::EDIT::  Add this (I'm more awake now!  :laugh: ):

+The Juno team proposes using a highly instrumented spacecraft placed in a polar orbit around Jupiter to investigate the existence of an ice-rock core, --->determine the global water<--- and ammonia abundances in Jupiter's atmosphere, study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere, investigate the origin of the jovian magnetic field and explore the polar magnetosphere..."


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#3 2004-08-05 05:54:09

remcook
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Posts: 78

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

sounds very nice. However, I think the Lunar south pole sample return mission will have a better chance. Especially with the new vision...

Anyway, if one of those will launch I'm happy smile

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#4 2004-08-05 11:38:48

bolbuyk
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From: Utrecht, Netherlands
Registered: 2004-04-07
Posts: 178

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Both sound interesting, I don't know which I favor the most. I think the Jovian mission.

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#5 2005-06-02 04:36:23

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Two proposals:  Jupiter & Luna

*I'm particularly interested in the "Juno" proposal:

"...a mission that would orbit Jupiter from pole to pole for the first time to conduct an in-depth study of the giant planet...

+ "Juno," Dr Scott Bolton, Principal Investigator, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

This investigation proposes to use a highly instrumented spacecraft placed in a polar orbit about the planet Jupiter to investigate the existence of an ice-rock core, determine the global water and ammonia abundances in Jupiter's atmosphere, study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere, investigate the origin of the jovian magnetic field, and explore the polar magnetosphere."

"Each proposal will now receive up to $1.2 million to conduct a seven-month implementation feasibility study focused on cost, management and technical plans, including educational outreach and small business involvement."

--Cindy

*Good news (for me anyway):

Proposed Juno mission advances

*Will proceed to a preliminary design phase.

If selected as -the- New Frontiers mission (seems likely), it must launch by June 30, 2010 and have a cost cap of $700 million.

Am glad Juno is in the lead for selection. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#6 2005-06-02 06:59:48

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

NASA Selects New Frontiers Mission Concept Study announcement

With the cash cap at $700 million, I would hope that no new instrument designs are used and that the $700 million did not include the cost of the rocket that it would ride on.

Even the HOP costs were over the 1 billion with pre made equipment totaling around $400 million to use in its possible launch to replace Hubble but that is another thread.

If we use the time that it takes to get to Jupiter and the mission staying time into acount, one would then believe that it would require at the very least an RTG nuclear power source. That alone probably puts the price tag over a billion IMO.

Would love to see this happen but in doing so then the JIMO probe would probably be further delayed or cancelled.

Moon missions are critical though for the practice for mars and any probe sample return of lunar ICE is practicle as well as of great value.
So after the LRO is done takening its high resolution images for landing selection, one can only hope that it is followed up by this sample return.

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#7 2005-06-02 10:32:22

SpaceNut
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Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Update as to who will build the probe in Destination Jupiter:
Lockheed to build probe for 2010 NASA exploratory mission

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#8 2005-06-02 12:54:00

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Nasawatch quote from Where Mission Costs Come From contained in the minutes of the:
NASA Universe Strategic Roadmap Commitee Draft minutes: March 21, 2005

"The original intent had been to seek science that could be done in the $600-700 million range; most of these fell in the $1 billion range. Sterl Phinney said the way to get $600 million missions was to ask for $300 million proposals."

Now the secret is out, to get lower launch cost ask for a less expensive rocket...

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#9 2005-06-02 21:21:41

Commodore
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From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

I would have thought the luner sample return mission would have been a no brainer.

Not that Juno is a bad idea, but if their going to spend $700 million on a mission to Jupiter, I'd rather they roll that money into the Prometheus class missions like the JIMO. They can probably pack any sensors they put on Juno on it as well.


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#10 2005-06-07 10:33:15

SpaceNut
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Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

More on the instruments and who will provide at least a few.
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) News SwRI to lead NASA's Juno mission, provide two science instruments

The first instrument is JADE, the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment, will measure the auroral electron and ion populations along the planet's magnetic field lines and determine which particle populations create the jovian aurora.

The second instrument, the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS), will image ultraviolet emissions from the jovian aurora, allowing space scientists to relate these auroral observations with JADE observations of the particle populations that create them.

This same group from SwRI also leads NASA's first New Frontiers Program mission, New Horizons, and built three of its payload instruments for the spacecraft to explore the Pluto-Charon system in 2015 and later move on to target one or more Kuiper belt objects.

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#11 2005-06-09 08:32:11

SpaceNut
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Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

The Juno Mission to Jupiter

goal is to perform a detailed study of the giant planet Jupiter.

The Juno spacecraft would be placed in a polar orbit around Jupiter. This would allow it to perform detailed gravitational measurements that could detect whether or not Jupiter has an ice-rock core beneath its clouds of hydrogen and helium.

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#12 2006-05-04 16:16:29

Commodore
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From: Upstate NY, USA
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Posts: 1,021

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Something else for Juno to study... the weather!

Hubble is giving astronomers their most detailed view yet of a second red spot emerging on Jupiter. For the first time in history, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a new red spot on the giant planet
little.red.spot.jpg

PRESS RELEASE
Date Released: Thursday, May 4, 2006
Source: Space Telescope Science Institute
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is giving astronomers their most detailed view yet of a second red spot emerging on Jupiter. For the first time in history, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a new red spot on the giant planet, which is located half a billion miles away. The storm is roughly one-half the diameter of its bigger and legendary cousin, the Great Red Spot. Researchers suggest that the new spot may be related to a possible major climate change in Jupiter's atmosphere.

Dubbed by some astronomers as "Red Spot Jr.," the new spot has been followed by amateur and professional astronomers for the past few months. But Hubble's new images provide a level of detail comparable to that achieved by NASA's Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft as they flew by Jupiter a quarter-century ago.

Before it mysteriously changed to the same color as the Great Red Spot, the smaller spot was known as the White Oval BA. It formed after three white oval-shaped storms merged during 1998 to 2000. At least one or two of the progenitor white ovals can be traced back to 90 years ago, but they may have been present earlier. A third spot appeared in 1939. (The Great Red Spot has been visible for the past 400 years, ever since earthbound observers had telescopes to see it).

When viewed at near-infrared wavelengths (specifically 892 nanometers -- a methane gas absorption band) Red Spot Jr. is about as prominent in Jupiter's cloudy atmosphere as the Great Red Spot. This may mean that the storm rises miles above the top of the main cloud deck on Jupiter just as its larger cousin is thought to do. Some astronomers think the red hue could be produced as the spots dredge up material from deeper in Jupiter's atmosphere, which is then chemically altered by the Sun’s ultraviolet light.

Researchers think the Hubble images may provide evidence that Jupiter is in the midst of a global climate change that will alter its average temperature at some latitudes by as much as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. The transfer of heat from the equator to the planet's south pole is predicted to nearly shut off at 34 degrees southern latitude, the latitude where the second red spot is forming. The effects of the shut-off were predicted by Philip Marcus of the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) to become apparent approximately seven years after the White Oval collisions in 1998 to 2000.

Two teams of astronomers were given discretionary time on Hubble to observe the new red spot.

[Left] -- This image, acquired April 8, 2006 with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (high-resolution channel), shows that the second red spot has a small amount of pale clouds in the center. A strong convective event, which is likely a thunderstorm, is visible as a bright white cloud north of the oval, in the turbulent clouds that precede the Great Red Spot. As the oval continues its eastward drift and the Great Red Spot moves westward, they should pass each other in early July. This contrast-enhanced image was taken in blue and red light. The group that performed this observation was led by Amy Simon-Miller (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), Glenn Orton (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and Nancy Chanover (New Mexico State University).

[Right] -- Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (wide field channel) took this image of the entire disk of Jupiter on April 16. The second red spot appears at southern latitudes, below the center of Jupiter’s disk. The new spot is approximately the size of Earth's diameter. The image was taken in visible light and at near-infrared wavelengths, and does not represent Jupiter's true colors. The red color traces high-altitude haze blankets: the equatorial zone, the Great Red Spot, the second red spot, and the polar hoods. The Hubble group that conducted this observation is led jointly by Imke de Pater (UCB Astronomy) and Philip Marcus (UCB Mechanical Engineering). Other team members are Michael Wong (UCB Astronomy), Xylar Asay-Davis (UCB Mechanical Engineering), and Christopher Go, an amateur astronomer with the Astronomical League of the Philippines.

Images and additional information about the research are available on the Web at:

    * http://hubblesite.org/news/2006/19
    * http://www.berkeley.edu/news/


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#13 2006-11-24 22:03:54

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Dr. Tristan Guillot provides new insights into the composition of giant planets

The future Juno mission, to be launched in 2011 will yield a measurement of Jupiter's gravity field with a precision that will be only second to that of the Earth. The Juno spacecraft, skimming over Jupiter's cloud tops will also measure the abundance of a key ingredient for planet formation: water in Jupiter's deep atmosphere.

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#14 2007-10-03 14:58:51

cIclops
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Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

NASA Selects Launch Services Provider - 3 Oct 2007

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA's Launch Services Program office at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., has selected Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services of Littleton, Colo., for the Juno mission to Jupiter.

The $190 million contract award is a competed firm-fixed-price task order. It includes the launch service for an Atlas V model 551 rocket, payload processing, launch vehicle integration, and the necessary tracking, data and telemetry support. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., in August 2011 on an interplanetary trajectory to Jupiter.

Juno will arrive at Jupiter in August 2016 to uncover the secrets hidden beneath the planet's thick, colorful clouds. Juno's remote sensing and gravity science measurements will characterize Jupiter's interior, atmosphere and polar magnetosphere with the primary science goal of understanding the planet's origin and evolution. A principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio leads the Juno mission.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#15 2007-10-08 20:29:13

SpaceNut
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Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

United Launch Alliance Atlas V Awarded Two NASA Missions

Juno, scheduled to launch in 2011 aboard
Atlas V rockets from SLC-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Under the terms of the contract, ULA is responsible for conducting vehicle integration and payload processing along with launch services.

NASA's Juno mission, scheduled to fly aboard an Atlas V 551
configuration vehicle, will explore Jupiter with the goal of understanding
the planet's origin and evolution. As the prototype of giant planets,
Jupiter could provide the knowledge needed to understand the origin of our solar system and the planetary systems being discovered around other stars.

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#16 2008-02-11 03:02:14

cIclops
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Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#17 2008-02-13 21:05:07

RedStreak
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From: Illinois
Registered: 2006-05-12
Posts: 541

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Reading the site and seeing the animations it looks like they plan a very tight 1-year science mission.  Sadly doesn't look like they have plans for an extension given the final orbit in the animations is for a de-orbit.

Still, measuring the size of the Jovian core would be enough of a discovery to help with the theories of planetary formation.  Has Cassini for that matter found and clues to the size of Saturn's own core>

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#18 2012-02-03 22:23:36

SpaceNut
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Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

A NASA probe on a five-year mission to Jupiter fired up its rocket thrusters this week to better aim itself at the largest planet in our solar system.

Jupiter-Bound NASA Probe Adjusts Course Toward Giant Planet

NASA launched the $1.1 billion Juno probe toward Jupiter in August 2011 atop an Atlas 5 rocket.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/JunoLaunch.pdf

http://space.wikia.com/wiki/Juno_%28spacecraft%29

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#19 2015-07-12 20:16:13

SpaceNut
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Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

It has been a five-year trek  With One Year to Jupiter, NASA's Juno Team Prepares

Juno is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016 (Pacific Daylight Time). Once it settles into orbit, the spacecraft will brave the hazards of Jupiter's intense radiation when it repeatedly approaches within a few thousand miles, or kilometers, of the cloud tops to collect its data.

Juno is the first mission dedicated to the study of a giant planet's interior, which it will do by mapping the planet's magnetic and gravity fields. The mission will also map the abundance of water vapor in the planet's atmosphere, providing the key to understanding which of several theories about the planet's formation is likely the correct one. In addition, Juno will travel through the previously unexplored region above the planet's poles, collecting the first images from there, along with data about electromagnetic forces and high-energy particles in the environment.

Mission duration to be a bit longer as the initial burns to set up orbital insertion is not to be as long and will not slow as much in order to start mapping sooner.

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#20 2016-06-12 16:56:10

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Countdown to Juno space probe's arrival at Jupiter: What will we find?

NASA's Juno mission, the most ambitious Jupiter probe yet, will arrive at our solar system's biggest planet on July 4.

Why NASA sent 3 defenseless Legos to die on Jupiter

AR-160619918.jpg&maxh=400&maxw=667

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#21 2016-06-13 18:28:44

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,576
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Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Better lifeless Legos than something truly alive.  That's a harsh place. 

GW


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#22 2016-06-13 19:18:41

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Fixed artifacts.....

So true but I know that we will not be sending man much beyond the asteriods in my life time but someday that will not be true and we will explore space.....

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#23 2016-06-14 09:04:11

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,576
Website

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

They'll need something better than a passive radiation shield to protect men at Jupiter.  They'll also need hotter propulsion to cut travel time.  The hohmann transfer to Jupiter is pretty long,  just one-way. 

Getting to the main asteroid belt is a bit of a stretch compared to Mars,  but I think we could do it,  and with pretty much the same manned vehicle as could serve to reach Mars orbit. Passive radiation shielding and spin gravity for near-1-gee.  Plenty of reconfigurable living space.  Lots of packed supplies to make up for our imperfect life support recycling capabilites. 

Doing impulsive burns to eliminate spiral-out time helps travel time.  So also would some sort of in-transit electric propulsion. 

Plenty of near-term things there to work on,  without waiting for any brand new technologies. 

GW


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#24 2016-06-14 19:57:32

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

I am a bit off topic for Juno but here is my reply
I agree no need to wait for new technology to be made as we are capable of living with old tech just fine.....We just need to be cost conscious, get the modules to orbit and refuel the tanks to send it on its way....Preload the crap out of Mars landing site and go to stay.....

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#25 2016-06-14 20:52:56

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,576
Website

Re: Juno - Jupiter Polar Orbiter

Hi Spacenut:

I sure would like to see a solution to the precision landing problem,  beyond GPS/etc-type hand-waving.  The problem is during the hypersonic entry with an atmosphere whose density at entry altitudes can vary by way over a factor of two.  There is no radio link to a site beacon for homing during the hypersonics,  because of the conductive plasma sheath.  The vehicle will need one hell of a good inertial navigation rig to detect when the entry trajectory is off-profile,  so the vehicle can be pitched to compensate. 

Once the hypersonics are over,  it's way too late to correct a big entry deceleration error.  The vehicle is already too low,  being high ballistic coefficient,  and unlike any of the robot probes up to now.  You only have like 2 minutes to impact,  maybe less.  The retropropulsive landing is at something in the vicinity of 2 or 3 gees (rather similar to peak entry gees,  actually).  It's one tough flight operation.  But that's when the site beacon can be used to set it down exactly where you want it.

Back to Jupiter -- this Juno thing has been traveling,  what,  two years to get there?  I never kept up with the details of this one.  Straight trajectory or some sort of gravity assist?

GW


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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