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#26 2005-01-13 11:33:11

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.floridatoday.com/!NEWSROOM/s … 1.htm]NASA not worried by craft shutdown

A comet-chasing NASA spacecraft went into a protective standby mode after launch Wednesday. The Fault protection software detected higher-than-expected temperatures in the spacecraft's propulsion system.

NASA spacecraft are outfitted with fault protection software that detects systems problems. The software automatically puts spacecraft in a so-called "safe mode" when trouble crops up. In safe mode, all but essential systems are turned off until the spacecraft receives new commands from ground controllers.

The likely fix in this case: Adjusting allowable temperature limits within the propulsion system.

A 300-degree Fahrenheit limit was programmed into the spacecraft prior to launch. The fault-detection software triggered when sensors detected temperatures of 326 degrees. The propulsion system can withstand much higher temperatures.

Thank goodness for reprogramable computers for if this had been the old style analog hard wired sensor this could have spelled disaster for the mission.

*Well, here's certainly hoping.  :-\

The article mentions other missions which have gone into safe mode "at one time or another" (yep).  But I can't help wondering if any of those other instances were so near to post-launch. 

Grammier said that Deep Impact's power-producing solar arrays were deployed and locked into place, and that the spacecraft had turned itself toward the sun.

That means spacecraft batteries will automatically charge, which is key to keeping the probe alive while engineers attempt to resolve the problem.

Please...

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#27 2005-01-13 19:52:00

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=15084]DI out of safe mode

*Everything is fine now; it's healthy and normal in-flight operations have resumed.  Great.

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#28 2005-01-17 12:25:39

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Editorial Spend the money here first by someone that does not know the value of the science that will be returned IMO.  sad

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#29 2005-01-18 03:45:07

GraemeSkinner
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From: Eden Hall, Cumbria
Registered: 2004-02-20
Posts: 563
Website

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Editorial http://www.bossierpress.com/index.php?o … Itemid=42] Spend the money here first by someone that does not know the value of the science that will be returned IMO.  sad

Sounds like someone with a gripe against the space industry in general to me, they've just picked Deep Impact to shout off about - when you read the article they could just have put any space mission title in (I'm half convinced thats what they've done anyway).

The trouble being of course that the more people that get articles such as that into print, the more the general public will start believing it, thats why we need people to give space a positive spin to counter the doubters.

Graeme


There was a young lady named Bright.
Whose speed was far faster than light;
She set out one day
in a relative way
And returned on the previous night.
--Arthur Buller--

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#30 2005-01-19 12:04:54

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

*As seen via Palomar's Hale telescope:

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07266]Deep Impact on its way:  Image

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.htm … 49]Article -here-  Currently the photo in the article isn't working, but I managed to find the image above in a different place.  :up:

Pic taken Jan 13, DI was approximately 163,000 miles away and traveling at a speed of approximately 10,000 mph. 

The high speed of the spacecraft causes it to appear as a long streak across the sky in the constellation Virgo during the 10-minute exposure time of the image.

Go DI!!  :band:

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#31 2005-01-20 10:59:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

This makes the second BAE Systems radiation-hardened microprocessors The RAD750 Microprocessor was manufactured at its Manassas, Va., facility. It will process and help return the data of the probe's collision to scientists on Earth.

BAE Systems has a 20-year history of providing radiation-hardened solutions for U.S. space programs. Its RAD6000 computers were installed on each of the still-broadcasting Mars Rovers - the only control and data computers aboard the two Rovers - to execute flight, landing and exploration operations on Mars.

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#32 2005-02-05 05:57:31

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.htm … 27]Observe DI close in on comet Tempel 1

*Nice.  They're putting together (or have put together) an interactive 3D orbital plotter.  Says: 

By running the orbital plotter forward in time, you will note that the comet overtakes the spacecraft on July 4, 2005...

but there's no link.  :-\  Nothing to download, etc.  Maybe it's too early in the morning or my eyes need an examination.  :hm:  But I'm not seeing it.

Anyway, thought I'd mention it.  Does anyone else have access to the resource mentioned?

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#33 2005-02-05 18:56:29

Shaun Barrett
Member
From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Cindy:-

Maybe it's too early in the morning or my eyes need an examination.

    Well, maybe we're both too tired or too blind to see but I can't seem to locate the thing either!  big_smile


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

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#34 2005-02-07 06:22:06

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Did a little digging an found the original Nasa JPL news release.

The link at the top of the release brings you to the 3d orbit visualization tool.

Note: Make sure you have Java enabled on your browser to see the applet.

other mission news from solar systems exploration page.

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#35 2005-03-25 17:23:56

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/05 … act.html]A bit of bad news

*One camera is blurry.  I'm about to sign off from the 'net, so will just copy and paste a bit:

At completion of the bake-out procedure, test images were taken through the HRI. These images indicate the telescope has not reached perfect focus.

NASA has formed a team to investigate. It might be possible to bring the camera into full focus.

Otherwise DI in good condition.  Still anticipating a very successful mission regardless. 

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#36 2005-03-28 07:45:58

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/comet-05g.html]DI enters "cruise phase"

*They've separated the flight operations into 5 mission phases.  "Cruise phase" continues for 60 days.

During the previous "commissioning phase" they checked DI's subsystems and scientific instruments.  All checked out okay, except of course now it's been discovered the telescope's camera isn't entirely in focus; they're working on that.

DI's high-gain antenna has been activated and is okay.

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#37 2005-03-28 09:29:29

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

I was following the news over the weekend and had learned of the cloudy lense. What a dispappointment to hear of this..

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#38 2005-03-30 08:38:07

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Nice mission link with a lot of details for viewing the event.[url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4391015.stm]
From the ESA Comet mission's images are blurry [/url]

Deep Impact - the US space agency (Nasa) mission to crash a projectile into a comet - is returning blurry images from one of its instruments.
But engineers believe they can probably fix the glitch and that the spacecraft itself is in good basic health.

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#39 2005-04-01 06:06:51

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Tempel-1: iceberg or galactic rubber ball?

NASA's Deep Impact probe launched successfully on 12 January, on a mission to more accurately understand the properties of comets.

Its target is Tempel-1 - chosen because although it might be rock and ice like most other comets, scientists have reason to suspect that much of its structure is highly elastic frozen cross-linked hydrocarbons (very much like Kevlar or stiff rubber).

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#40 2005-04-20 09:02:58

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

*Found this just now at space.com.  This is absurd:

April 20

Russian Astrologist Sues NASA

NASA has been taken to court in Russia over its plans to crack open a comet.

Marina Bai, a Russian astrologist, filed a lawsuit last month with the Presnensky district court in Moscow, demanding that the U.S. space agency call off its $311 million Deep Impact mission.  As reported in MosNews.com, Bai is also asking for 8.7 billion rubles ($311 million) in compensation for moral damages.

“The actions of NASA infringe upon my system of spiritual and life values, in particular on the values of every element of creation, upon the unacceptability of barbarically interfering with the natural life of the universe, and the violation of the natural balance of the Universe,” Bai said in her claim.

Deep Impact, which is already in space, is scheduled to collide with Comet 9P/Tempel 1 on July 4th of this year.  The spacecraft carries explosives, which will be used to dig out a crater in the comet.  Scientists will then hope to learn what a typical comet is made of. 

The district court dismissed the Bai’s case, but the Moscow City Court took up the appeal and will rule following a hearing scheduled for May 6. 

Benny Peiser, a researcher at Liverpool John Moores University who follows asteroid science and the surrounding media and public attention, said even some Russian scientists have jumped on this court case, calling the space mission an act of "vandalism that cannot be justified."

"I can only hope that this irrational technophobia is not a sign of things to come in other parts of Europe, which is already falling worryingly behind internationally in science and technology, never mind space exploration," Peiser told SPACE.com.

Irrational technophobia indeed.  (Or something entirely different?  Was Huygens considered an act of vandalism, with its landing on the pristine surface of Titan?  Well, don't want to get off-topic -- that's enough said). 

It's one comet among THOUSANDS of comets.  It'll survive, continue shuttling back and forth through the Solar System for aeons.

And Ms. Bai needs a psychiatric examination, IMO.  Opinions are like nostrils, Ms. Bai; everyone's got them.  Get off your high horse and go see a shrink.  Unfortunately, she's got colleagues (other scientists) supporting her stupidity.

--Cindy

::EDIT::  I've created http://www.newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1257]a thread for discussing the politics of this situation.


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#41 2005-04-21 06:13:07

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Much like the genesis mission it is a once in a time probe with probably no others ever to folow up or to preform in this case as deep space impact a huge explosion when it strikes it. It will hopefully for fill the answer to comet questions of makeup.

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#42 2005-04-22 04:59:02

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.htm … ]Planetary Society's "Great Comet Crater Contest"

The Planetary Society invites you to make your best guess on how big the hole will be when NASA's Deep Impact mission releases an impactor projectile in the path of Comet Tempel 1 for a planned collision on July 4, 2005.  The "Great Comet Crater Contest" can be found at http://planetary.org/deepimpact.]http:/ … deepimpact.

Only 1 guess per 1 person allowed.  Apparently even professionals are getting into the act, creating betting pools.

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#43 2005-04-27 15:28:04

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.htm … 6763]Hello Tempel 1

*A photo of Tempel 1 from DI, at a distance of 39.7 million miles and 69 days to rendezvous.  It's the first of "many comet portraits" DI will take in the interim. 

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#44 2005-04-28 05:21:28

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Should be quite the display in 10 weeks.

It could also be quite a cosmic fireworks display: Skywatchers should be able to watch the brightening of the comet through binoculars and small telescopes — or even using the naked eye, under just the right conditions.

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#45 2005-05-16 07:00:41

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n050 … ct/]Update:  2nd trajectory correction maneuver successful (May 4)

*59 days to impact.  DI's speed has increased by 11.3 mph.  It was a 95-second burn, "the longest remaining firing of the spacecraft's motors prior to comet encounter."

They're calling it a "textbook maneuver" which has DI "right on the money."

DI's performance dubbed "excellent."

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#46 2005-05-16 15:03:03

C M Edwards
Member
From: Lake Charles LA USA
Registered: 2002-04-29
Posts: 1,012

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

I just bet on 2.0 meters, which would imply the comet is composed of an aerogel heat shield over steel plate. 

I'm expecting my copper plaque any day now.   cool


"We go big, or we don't go."  - GCNRevenger

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#47 2005-05-31 05:57:16

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Probe heads for comet, but camera is unfocused

You would think that for the money that we would have got a better camera lense system.

The spacecraft will release its smart impactor a day before the collision, set for 1:52 a.m. EDT on July 4, a time that could change slightly as the encounter approaches.

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#48 2005-06-03 05:55:11

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Found this reference press packet.
detailing out mission cost and lots more.

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#49 2005-06-03 11:13:24

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish … ervatories begin calibrating for DI

*At least 30 telescopes will be observing, including notable heavyweights HST, Spitzer and Chandra (X-Ray).

This is gonna be good.  cool

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#50 2005-06-03 11:53:31

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,639

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

How to Watch July 4 Comet Impact


The best consensus from comet experts suggest that after the impactor hits and the resultant dust cloud gradually expands, Comet Tempel 1 could perhaps brighten up to 6th magnitude. The faintest star that most eyes will see under dark sky conditions is 6th magnitude, so there is a chance that Comet Tempel 1 might just become bright enough to glimpse without any optical aid, but most likely that would be the case only for experienced observers in perfect conditions away from all light pollution.

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