New Mars Forums

Official discussion forum of The Mars Society and MarsNews.com

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Announcement: This forum is accepting new registrations by emailing newmarsmember * gmail.com become a registered member. Read the Recruiting expertise for NewMars Forum topic in Meta New Mars for other information for this process.

#1 2002-06-19 13:25:21

Mark S
Banned
Registered: 2002-04-11
Posts: 343

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

I'm glad that the ISS will be used for the Translife mission, because it should cut down on the cost and risk of the mission, as well as giving the space agencies a link to the Mars Society.

However, this also presents a new engineering problem.  As I understand it, the Translife centrifuge will be connected to an experiment rack on the ISS main truss.  Although the spin rate of the experiment will not be high, and it will not have a large amount of angular momentum, it will still cause some rotation on board the ISS, as the station rotates in the opposite direction to conserve angular momentum.  What is the Translife team going to do about this?


"I'm not much of a 'hands-on' evil scientist."--Dr. Evil, "Goldmember"

Offline

#2 2002-06-19 19:41:38

Phobos
Member
Registered: 2002-01-02
Posts: 1,103

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

I'm not familiar with the "Trans-Life" project.  From the name I take it's somekind of program aimed at seeding life at other places off of Earth?  Well it's encouraging to see that maybe there's half-decent experiments going on in the ISS.


To achieve the impossible you must attempt the absurd

Offline

#3 2002-06-20 10:02:07

Mark S
Banned
Registered: 2002-04-11
Posts: 343

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

Translife is the Mars Society's effort to create an artificial gravity environment for mice in space.  The mice will stay in space for one gestation period, and the offspring will be studied.  The experiment seeks to prove two things: it is possible to use centripetal force to simulate gravity, and it is possible for organisms to live a somewhat-normal life in Mars's reduced gravity.


"I'm not much of a 'hands-on' evil scientist."--Dr. Evil, "Goldmember"

Offline

#4 2002-06-26 05:38:56

Shaun Barrett
Member
From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

Surely the ISS has small thrusters which should have no trouble compensating for unwanted rotations?!
   What's more worrying is the fact that cost over-runs mean there'll only be 3 crew members on the station at any one time. This is enough to run the station's systems, but not enough to conduct scientific experiments such as Translife!
   I assume Dr. Zubrin is working on this possible dilemma?
                                        ???


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

Offline

#5 2002-06-26 19:02:24

Phobos
Member
Registered: 2002-01-02
Posts: 1,103

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

I read somewhere that the Russians were planning to build another hab module for the ISS that they could rent living space on.  I might have been delusional when I read it though.  Anyways, the ISS seems to be turning into more of a space hotel than anything else.  Not that I have a problem with people paying to visit it, but as a science station I don't have the impression the ISS is even close to living up to its potential. sad


To achieve the impossible you must attempt the absurd

Offline

#6 2002-07-09 19:37:45

hillkid
InActive
Registered: 2002-07-09
Posts: 1

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

One of the advantages of placing the Translife mission on board someone else's spacecraft is that momentum control and the like becomes the ISS problem.  While the momentum of a spinning centrifuge may seem high, the station can handle it.  What likely happens for short periods of time, there are momentum wheels that absorb momentum for a while, then thrusters fire to dump any additional.  There are other ways to do it, but this is the most common.

Offline

#7 2002-07-11 19:45:06

Preston
Banned
Registered: 2002-06-02
Posts: 72

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

???

Translife or the Mars Gravity Biosatellite Project has nothing to do with the ISS. What is your source on this? Did I miss something?

http://www.marssociety.org/translife
http://www.marsgravity.org/index.php

Offline

#8 2002-07-12 08:02:18

Mark S
Banned
Registered: 2002-04-11
Posts: 343

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

I had read somewhere that Translife would be conducted onboard the ISS because it would be cheaper (and better/faster ?) than launching an independent bio-satellite on a Russian SLBM.  Of course, the teams involved are also planning a free-floating version of the spacecraft in case ISS doesn't pan out.  As currently envisioned, ISS astronauts will only be able to devote 20 hours/week for science until the station'scapacity is expanded in 2009.


"I'm not much of a 'hands-on' evil scientist."--Dr. Evil, "Goldmember"

Offline

#9 2002-07-12 12:52:13

Preston
Banned
Registered: 2002-06-02
Posts: 72

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

It would make sense if they could put translife in the ISS's Centrifuge module, which is already designed to simulate gravity > 0g (such as 0.38g), but to my knowledge that has been either axed or delayed.

Offline

#10 2002-09-20 17:08:07

Mark S
Banned
Registered: 2002-04-11
Posts: 343

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

It looks like Translife will be a free-flying bio-sat after all.


"I'm not much of a 'hands-on' evil scientist."--Dr. Evil, "Goldmember"

Offline

#11 2002-09-20 17:13:34

Josh Cryer
Moderator
Registered: 2001-09-29
Posts: 3,830

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

You gotta provide links, Mark! sad


Some useful links while MER are active. [url=http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html]Offical site[/url] [url=http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Web.html]NASA TV[/url] [url=http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/]JPL MER2004[/url] [url=http://www.spaceflightnow.com/mars/mera/statustextonly.html]Text feed[/url]
--------
The amount of solar radiation reaching the surface of the earth totals some 3.9 million exajoules a year.

Offline

#12 2002-09-20 22:08:53

Mark S
Banned
Registered: 2002-04-11
Posts: 343

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?


"I'm not much of a 'hands-on' evil scientist."--Dr. Evil, "Goldmember"

Offline

#13 2002-09-21 05:58:19

Josh Cryer
Moderator
Registered: 2001-09-29
Posts: 3,830

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

Hmm, I don't see anything about the Mars Society, or Translife in this article... looks like a takeoff of the Mars Society's idea.

I could be wrong, though. Anyone know anything more?


Some useful links while MER are active. [url=http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html]Offical site[/url] [url=http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Web.html]NASA TV[/url] [url=http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer2004/]JPL MER2004[/url] [url=http://www.spaceflightnow.com/mars/mera/statustextonly.html]Text feed[/url]
--------
The amount of solar radiation reaching the surface of the earth totals some 3.9 million exajoules a year.

Offline

#14 2003-09-24 03:10:25

alokmohan
Member
From: india
Registered: 2003-09-14
Posts: 169

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

The idea of translife experiment is essential.

Offline

#15 2023-11-01 06:43:47

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 17,891

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

This topic has been silent since 2003.  I'd be interested in an update, if anyone has time to investigate.

I note that at the time, the centrifugal facility for ISS was reported to have been built.  In other posts in the forum, members have lamented the fact the facility was never launched.

(th)

Offline

#16 2023-11-01 07:56:43

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,772

Re: Translife on ISS - Does anyone see a problem with this?

an old space ref article 2001

https://spaceref.com/press-release/mars … n-project/

The Translife mission will consist of a Mars-level (0.38 g)artificial gravity spacecraft carrying a crew of mice (and possibly other animals and plants) in low Earth orbit for a period of roughly two months.


NASA was supportive of this idea for a while but then For some reason which seems to be economics, NASA had decided not to look at Artificial Gravity Stations and decided to not support the Mars Gravity Biosatellite idea


The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Program Is Closing Down
https://archive.ph/NmnR

Unfortunately, with the current economy and priorities at NASA, the time has come to close out the program and look forward to the next adventure. It is with great pride in the accomplishments of our team that I thank each of you for your support over the years.

quote
In the weeks ahead, we will be collating a portfolio of design documents, historical information, and key references from the program and sharing them online.


Mars Gravity Biosatellite was meant to provide data on mammal health affected by long-term exposure to lower levels of gravity, focusing on bone loss, changes in bone structure, muscle atrophy, and changes in the inner ear. Results from the mission experiment would have been compared against a variety of Earth-based controls, including vivarium, hindlimb suspension, partial weight suspension, flight habitat effects, and short-radius centrifuge testing.

MARS GRAVITY BIOSATELLITE: ENGINEERING, SCIENCE, AND EDUCATION

link

https://web.archive.org/web/20120315125 … 2.7.05.pdf

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite program is both
an affordable and meaningful investment in the
future that will:
1. Help establish whether Mars-level artificial gravity can serve as an effective countermeasure for mammals against the
physiological deterioration that accompanies long-duration spaceflight in microgravity.
2. Validate a low-mass artificial gravity spacecraft and life support system to support future missions.
3. Educate and excite students about real-world aerospace and biomedical endeavors, providing a core training ground for the next
generation of STEM professionals.

The last plant animal experiment other than NASA's and JAXA artificial gravity on the ISS, Multiple Artificial-gravity Research Systems and NASA and Soviet Biosatellite was the Chinese Bio experiment inside on of its rovers on the Moon. The Centrifuge Accommodations Module (CAM) is a cancelled element of the International Space Station, maybe you could still dust it off and clean it up and launch it is still stuck on the ground and on display in an outdoor exhibit at the Tsukuba Space Center in Japan.

internet questions

Why are centrifuges not used on the space station?
https://space.stackexchange.com/questio … ce-station

Both Robert Zubrin and Elon Musk supported the idea of a Mars Gravity Biosatellite, Elon Musk was operating Falcon 1  from 2006 to 2009 during this time it would launch 180 kg LEO the rocket is now retired and replaced by Falcon 9 a reusable medium-lift to Heavy launch vehicle.

once again shifting economic priorities at NASA.

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2023-11-01 08:36:39)

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB