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#26 2022-11-04 18:47:19

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 5,067

Re: Liquid water confirmed on Mars

I just talked about this in the last post.  Here it is again: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=NA … M%3DHDRSC3

I have some notions about this.  They say it has to have geothermal energy, and perhaps it will be geothermal energy.  I also suggest electrical currents, perhaps generated by dust storms and other factors.

I do think that it might be some other odd mix of fluids, maybe liquid CO2 and/or water, with salts.  Maybe Hydrogen Peroxide also included.

A mix like that could be liquid at lower temps.

It would be hard to land a probe with the ability to pick up Mars quakes, and impacts, but with Starship or some other on coming capabilities, I would think it could be done.  Perhaps add a small, modified reactor to keep it powered and warm.  Maybe Kilo power?

Perhaps give it the ability to ping like a sonar?

To me that would be a much faster and sooner attainable source of additional data.

I do not understand how the ice movements occur.  If it is like Greenland, and Antarctica, there would be under ice rivers.  But I don't think it possible to have seas to drain into.  Maybe, but I don' t think so.

Could there be aquifers, and even ancient, formed cave systems for water to drain into?  But I don't know if the polar cap gets enough precipitation to feed such a thing.

If the flows are significant then I wonder if some of the ice sheets are formed by flooding, a sort of cryovolcanic activity???

For the North Cap, I don't think that there would be a flow, just static water with ice over it.  Not that there is necessarily any heat for that north cap either.  Again, I don't know.

Done.

Last edited by Void (2022-11-04 18:55:01)


Done.

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#27 2022-11-06 09:05:47

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 5,067

Re: Liquid water confirmed on Mars

So, this is a bit off topic, unless it is considered for the delivery of probes to the Martian ice caps, or some other difficult but worthy task.


This is about the 2 stage Terran-R and the Impulse lander.
https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Te … &FORM=VIRE

This collection of stages, 1st, 2nd, and the Impulse lander, seem to work a bit different than Starship.  The entry of the 2nd stage starts like Starship, but then seems to change over to the method of Neutron/(Rocket Lab).  The orbit of the 2nd stage seems to be depicted as being more elliptical than for the LEO of Starship.  This depiction does not involve orbital refilling, I suppose someday Terran-R might have that, to extend its capabilities.

I have read that the science community is becoming excited about the potential of the Starship system.  I am wondering if a version of Starship could host a larger sized space probe like the impulse lander.  There is something to be said for having a 3rd stage for the Starship, which would not be likely to be typically reused or repurposed.  It could be carried to orbit like the impulse, or like Neutron might do.  The potential to refill in orbit might be reserved as a potential for the future.

Of course, what I want is a lander(s) that can land on the polar ice caps or near them, and which would have prolonged life by perhaps including a Kilowatt reactor.  But I understand that landing large devices to even low altitude surfaces is very hard.  All I can say is that a Starship supported mission might have the luxury of lots of mass.  Perhaps it might host retrorockets on steroids, and get away with it?
Perhaps it would not even bother with Parachutes, just an aeroshell, and retrorockets?  That might allow for a more high-altitude landing???

While it is rather romantic to think of having a Starship or Starship mini that could hop around Mars to explore such things, bringing humans with it, I think that for a mission like this that would not be optimal.  Rather, some kind of lander hosted by Starship with robotics and instrumentation might be the more effective way to discover more of about some locations on Mars.

Done.

Last edited by Void (2022-11-06 09:20:38)


Done.

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