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#1 2008-02-07 07:13:28

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

Funding for starting this new mission has been requested in the FY2009 budget. Planned launch is 2015.

Exploring the Other 70% of the Universe

The Joint Dark Energy Mission is an Einstein probe that will focus on investigating dark energy. JDEM is a partnership between NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy. In August 2006 NASA initiated the study of three mission concepts for JDEM: the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope (ADEPT), the SuperNova/Acceleration Probe-Lensing (SNAP-L), and the Dark Energy Space Telescope (Destiny). The JDEM mission that actually flies will be determined by a future, open competition.

Each group plans to measure how the universe's expansion rate has changed over time by studying Type Ia supernovae: the explosive deaths of white dwarfs. Type Ia supernovae are relatively uniform in their luminosities and other properties, and they are extremely luminous. So they are ideal "standard candles" for measuring distances to remote galaxies.

By observing many Type Ia events in their host galaxies, both near and far, scientists can determine how fast galaxies are moving away from us, and this in turn yields crucial information about how fast our universe was expanding at different epochs. In fact, this is how two independent teams of astronomers discovered dark energy in 1998.

Yet each proposed mission incorporates at least one additional measurement technique as well, unique to that spacecraft. The combination of multiple techniques provides independent and complementary checks on the history of cosmic expansion. These additional methods all delve into the infrared regime, and for good reason: the most distant stars and galaxies glow primarily in infrared. The expanding universe has literally stretched (or redshifted) their visible light into the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#2 2008-05-09 06:13:19

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

RFI Potential Science Investigations (PDF) - 28 Mar 2008

JDEM is one of three Einstein Probe missions spelled out in NASA’s Beyond Einstein Roadmap, with a targeted total life cycle cost cap of ~$600M (FY08$) excluding launch vehicle cost. This cost cap includes NASA, DOE, and any other domestic or international contributions.

Following the Announcement of Opportunity in late 2008, the science investigation will be selected in 2009, with a project start that same year. The launch of JDEM is planned for 2014-2015, and a nominal science operations lifetime of three years is assumed, although not required.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#3 2020-12-25 19:40:08

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 27,185

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

Still ic in search of an answer as we still are learning that we do not totally understand.
Is Einstein’s Cosmological Constant The Same As Dark Energy?

960x0.jpg?fit=scale

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#4 2020-12-25 20:46:41

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 12,757

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

For SpaceNut re #3

Nice find! Thanks!

For all that the article is written in a folksy style, it sure does pack a mathematical punch!

Ask Ethan: Is Einstein’s Cosmological Constant The Same As Dark Energy?
Starts With A Bang
Ethan SiegelSenior Contributor
Starts With A BangContributor Group
Science
The Universe is out there, waiting for you to discover it.

Bottom line ... physicists need to keep doing observations and trying to make sense of them.

Fortunately, they are, and they will!

(th)

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#5 2020-12-25 20:54:27

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 27,185

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

Your observation for the orbit of Mars falls in the acceleration and deceleration as its circles a large mass.

Its how the total of the sun reacts to the others that is only seen a bit as we get red or blues shift in the Doppler color of the stars that we are observing from earth.

From earth we see both occurring and its that end of the theory which has the galaxy collapsing towards another big bang or to keep flying away from each other to a cool ending in the far off future.

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#6 2022-10-10 04:32:47

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 4,796

Re: Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)

The Dark Energy Camera has Captured a Million Images, an Eighth of the Entire sky. Here are Some of its Best Pictures so far
https://www.universetoday.com/157971/th … es-so-far/

some other new mars discussion inside the forums

'Singularity - Black Holes, Gamma Rays, Magnetars, etc'
https://newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=3085

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