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#1 2012-12-17 21:22:57

bobunf
Member
From: Phoenix, AZ
Registered: 2005-11-21
Posts: 223

Indian Mission to Mars

India plans to send a spacecraft to Mars in a giant leap forward for science and technology in the country.  Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said the unmanned spacecraft will enter orbit around the planet and collect scientific information.

He announced the 4.5 billion rupee ($82 million) mission during a speech marking the 65th anniversary of India's independence from British rule.  "This spaceship to Mars will be a huge step for us in the area of science and technology," he said.  The spacecraft is to be launched in November 2013 on a frequently used rocket developed by the Indian Space Research Organization. 

India has had an active space program since the 1960s. Since the 1970s it has launched scores of satellites for itself and for nearly two dozen other countries.

In 2008, India successfully sent a probe to the moon that detected evidence of water on the lunar surface for the first time. India is also planning a rover mission to the moon and is awaiting budgetary approval for a manned space mission.

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#2 2012-12-18 17:42:04

JoshNH4H
Member
From: Pullman, WA
Registered: 2007-07-15
Posts: 2,559
Website

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

Good for India.  It would be quite an impressive technological feat for them to successfully send a probe to do orbital science of Mars.  Is there any information on what sensors, imaging abilities, etc. whatever probe they send will have?


-Josh

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#3 2020-07-28 06:55:35

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,137

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

Here is an update that generally fits in this topic ...

It is good to see the collaboration between educational institutions and NASA via their educational support affiliates.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/school-girls … 56329.html

Another aspect of the discovery reported is that the asteroid is near Mars at the time of discovery. 

That is another indication that resources that would be helpful for settlement of Mars are moving around the Solar System, and they occasionally come near Mars.

(th)

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#4 2020-08-15 06:19:51

juliusbarry
InActive
Registered: 2020-07-31
Posts: 3

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

tahanson43206 wrote:

Here is an update that generally fits in this topic ...

It is good to see the collaboration between educational institutions and NASA via their educational support affiliates.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/school-girls … 56329.html

Another aspect of the discovery reported is that the asteroid is near Mars at the time of discovery. 

That is another indication that resources that would be helpful for settlement of Mars are moving around the Solar System, and they occasionally come near Mars.

(th)

Wow, thanks for the update. As for the collaboration, a very good  move I must say.I came across this...

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#5 2020-08-15 07:10:35

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,137

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

For juliusbarry re #3 and #4

This note is to acknowledge your updates.  Will have to come back later with more time to study the link you provided.

Edit#1: For juliusbarry .... are you a sales person for the diesel manufacturer in the UK?

I see nothing about the link you provided that has anything to do with the Indian Mission to Mars.

Please reply within a day or two.

Posts that are not related to the topic can be moved or deleted.

(th)

Last edited by tahanson43206 (2020-08-15 08:47:13)

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#6 2020-08-15 09:25:22

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 29,309

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

juliusbarry, the company link is spamming when it does not provide information pertinent to the topic.

It may be relative to a topic we have going, otherwise its not allowed.

adapted post made http://newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=9238

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#7 2020-08-16 06:51:44

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,137

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

Call for participation ...

The Indian Mission to Mars topic deserves at least one "full time" correspondent.

This is in opportunity for a forum reader from India to help to update this topic with news of the progress of the Indian space program, and specifically their initiatives to explore and eventually create a sustainable settlement on Mars.

(th)

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#8 2020-08-16 09:02:46

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 29,309

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

The US has been partnered with India for many satellite launches and could in time perform human launch.
You are correct with a call for other international forum recruiting and membership just the same as Mars Society.

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#9 2020-08-16 10:07:50

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,137

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

For SpaceNut ...

Thanks for the reminder that the Mars Society (which generously funds this forum) may have members from India.

It is possible the new forum that Mr. Burk created to serve Mars Society members might be willing to consider posting an invitation to help with posting on this (elder relative) forum.

I haven't been over there since the forum started.  This forum seems more than able to consume any free time I might have in a given day. Some posts (by kbd512, GW Johnson and RobertDyck) overwhelm my (somewhat limited) bandwidth.

(th)

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#10 2020-08-16 15:38:51

GW Johnson
Member
From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 5,615
Website

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

Sorry.  Did not mean to overwhelm anybody or anything.

GW


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#11 2020-08-16 16:09:38

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 29,309

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

tahanson43206, you need to remember we are all not experts but have life's experiences that we are bringing to the table and in fact some of us are just armchair engineers.

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#12 2023-02-03 22:22:09

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 18,137

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

vibration-disturbance-caused-failure-of-new-indian-rocket-isro-says

This report is not about Mars directly... it reports on analysis of a multi-stage rocket failure last year...

'Vibration disturbance' caused failure of new Indian rocket, ISRO says
Story by Mike Wall • 8h ago
Comments
Indian space officials say they know what went wrong on the debut flight of the nation's new rocket last summer.

India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) launches for the first time, on Aug. 6, 2022. The mission failed, and the two satellites aboard the rocket were lost.

India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) launches for the first time, on Aug. 6, 2022. The mission failed, and the two satellites aboard the rocket were lost.

© ISRO
The 112-foot-tall (34 meters) Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV) lifted off for the first time ever on Aug. 6, 2022, carrying the EOS-02 Earth-observation satellite and a tiny student-built cubesat called AzaadiSAT skyward.

Everything went well at first. But instead of delivering the two satellites to their intended circular orbit 221 miles (356 kilometers) above Earth, the rocket ejected the payloads into a highly elliptical path that took them within just 47 miles (76 km) of Earth at the closest point, or perigee. Both spacecraft came crashing back to Earth in short order.

Related: ISRO: The Indian Space Research Organisation


India launches SSLV rocket on maiden flight, fails to deliver satellites
Six months later, ISRO officials have pinpointed what caused the failure of the SSLV, which consists of three solid-fuel stages topped by a "velocity trimming module," or VTM.

Analyses "revealed that there was a vibration disturbance for a short duration on the Equipment Bay (EB) deck during the second stage (SS2) separation," ISRO wrote in an update on Wednesday (Feb. 1).

This higher-than-expected vibration briefly saturated all six accelerometers in the rocket's navigation system. As a result, onboard software declared the accelerometers faulty and triggered a "salvage mission mode," in which the SSLV attempts to deploy payloads into a stable orbit despite a detected anomaly, ISRO officials explained.

The satellites were not successfully salvaged, however; deployment occurred when the SSLV was going about 125 mph (200 kph) slower than the required 17,209 mph (27,695 kph). The velocity shortfall is attributable, at least in part, to the fact that the VTM never fired up — a feature of salvage mode.

"VTM ignition was bypassed as programmed, since it could be a deterrent to the success of salvage option in some cases," ISRO officials wrote.

In addition, the SSLV conducted its salvage work without data from the accelerometers, because they had been declared faulty. Investigators have since concluded, however, that the accelerometers survived the vibrational shock in good shape; they were briefly saturated but not damaged.

The investigation also highlighted a number of measures that, taken together, should prevent the problems that doomed the SSLV's debut flight from cropping up again.

For example, designers have swapped out the second-stage separation system, installing one that's "proven to be generating lesser shock and is already used in the separation of third stage," the ISRO update reads.

In addition, salvage mode won't automatically lock out the VTM anymore.

"The propulsive capability of VTM will be considered in this salvage mode also, and thrusters will be operated to ensure the minimum required perigee for the mission," ISRO officials wrote.

These changes have apparently been incorporated already, for the SSLV, which can loft up to 1,100 pounds (500 kilograms) to low Earth orbit, is getting ready to fly again. ISRO is targeting the first quarter of this year for the rocket's second mission, which will carry the EOS-07 Earth-observation satellite and two smaller rideshare payloads.

Mike Wall is the author of "Out There" (Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrated by Karl Tate), a book about the search for alien life. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom or on Facebook. 

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(th)

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#13 2023-03-03 15:04:17

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 9,774

Re: Indian Mission to Mars

Russia Partners India To Develop A 'Marsoplane'; Aim To Explore The Red Planet With Fixed Wing Robotic Craft

https://eurasiantimes.com/russia-partne … o-explore/

India-Russia Working On New 'Marsoplane' To Explore Mars, Test Flight In 2024: Report
https://www.republicworld.com/science/s … eshow.html

Work on the Marsoplane began after securing funding in April 2022

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