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#51 2019-12-12 13:21:35

GW Johnson
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From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 3,756
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Re: Space Launch System

Bridenstine himself says SLS will cost about $1.6 Billion per launch,  if only one is procured in any given year,  $0.8 Billion if more than one is procured in any given year.  So,  at 130 metric tons delivered payload to LEO,  that's $6.2M to $12.3M per delivered metric ton. 

And for the initial SLS configuration,  it's not 130 tons,  it's nearer 70 tons delivered payload.  So those prices are nearer $12M-24M/ton,  really. 

Falcon-9 is about $3M/ton flown expendably,  and Falcon-Heavy about $1.4M/ton flown expendably.  Atlas-5 falls nearer $4M/ton in the bigger configurations,  higher in the smaller configurations. 

The price trends with the flying vehicles has been static to gently downward in recent years.  The price trends for SLS,  which is still ~1-2 years from flying in any configuration,  have roughly doubled (or more) over the last 3-5 years.

And the prime contractor for SLS is the same one who has botched-up the 737 MAX and 737NG programs,  and has had severe quality problems with 787.  Why would you want a rocket made by those guys?

Anybody else notice a pattern there?

GW

Last edited by GW Johnson (2019-12-12 13:26:27)


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#52 2019-12-12 18:23:09

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,402

Re: Space Launch System

With contracts that pay whether they complete the full goal with only a minimum goal required for output for the bucks that they recieved.

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#53 2019-12-15 18:46:56

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,402

Re: Space Launch System

I guess slow anouncement prgoress is better than hearing nothing about when a flight will happen. Preparing to test Orion spacecraft requires a big plane, huge cranes and a vacuum cleaner

orion-spacecraft-plum-brook-station-testing-hg.jpg

Even around the vacuum chamber, a little vacuuming is required to make sure the facility and Orion are kept extremely clean. There are two types of contamination engineers are concerned about: particulate, which you can see, and molecular, which you can't see. Both can cause problems during the tests, but they can also be dangerous during flight.

The slightest amount of dust or grease could disrupt sensors on the spacecraft's surfaces and its sensitive navigation system. To help keep everything sterilized, every person working near the spacecraft is required to suit up from head to toe with gowns, hoods, latex gloves, shoe covers and beard covers. Even the number of particles floating around the room gets monitored.

Although it looks like tin foil, the metallic material wrapped around Orion and the Heat Flux System is a material called Mylar. It's used as a thermal barrier to help control which areas of the spacecraft get heated and cooled during testing. This helps the team avoid wasting energy heating and cooling spots unnecessarily.

It took a little over a week to prepare Orion for its thermal test in the vacuum chamber. Now begins the 63-day process of heating and cooling the capsule to ensure it's ready to withstand the journey around the Moon and back.

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#54 2020-01-06 22:33:37

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,402

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