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#1 2017-01-14 10:55:14

Tom Kalbfus
Banned
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 4,401

Giant robots on Mars!

JS116735710_REUTERS_An-employee-controls-the-arms-of-a-manned-biped-walking-robot-METHOD-2-durin-large_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqZgEkZX3M936N5BQK4Va8RTgjU7QtstFrD21mzXAYo54.jpg
Mech_Avatar_Movie.jpg
The top one is the real robot built in South Korea, the bottom picture is the robot depicted in Avatar. Now I was thinking, if these robots were used in the Movie Avatar, what about using robots like these on Mars, or maybe someday Venus or Titan? The larger the robot on Venus the easier it is to keep cool, or warm as in the case of Titan. On Mars, one of these walking robots could replace a rover.

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#2 2017-01-14 12:34:56

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,181

Re: Giant robots on Mars!

Can we say also from sigourney weaver alien robot

aliens2_660_446_60.jpg

Power assist suits might be the way to go rather than sending heavy equipment

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#3 2017-01-14 14:17:47

Tom Kalbfus
Banned
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 4,401

Re: Giant robots on Mars!

The advantage of the robot is you can scratch your nose, and if you sneeze on your face plate, you aren't stuck looking at your snot for the rest of the EVA, within the robot you can wipe it off the windshield. Also you can handle tools more easily with a robot actuated hand than with your own hand within a pressurized space suited glove. You can definitely have longer EVAs and bring back more samples with larger rocks.

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#4 2017-01-15 23:14:06

kbd512
Moderator
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 2,962

Re: Giant robots on Mars!

I can see how anthropomorphic tele-robotically-operated vehicles (ATRV's) would be useful for colonization.  If the robot had dextrous human-like motion, it could be useful for drilling operations where handling of heavy piping for water and mineral mining would typically require cranes and other heavy earth moving equipment.  An operator could roll or use mechanical leverage to move construction materials into position.  Purpose-built equipment would be better, but ATRV's could perform a wide range of tasks that would typically involve multiple pieces of heavy equipment.  Techniques for movement of materials and equipment would clearly differ from standard construction practices, but most operations not involving extraordinarily heavy equipment and materials could be accomplished with a 2.5t ATRV, even if it wasn't the most efficient solution possible for a specific operation.  It's a general purpose solution that requires quite a bit of design and development work.

In order for your concept to work well, you really need fuel cells for power and an established base of operations.  Still, it's an interesting concept for construction.  Imagine how much quicker pipe could be fed into wells if an ATRV could simply pick up a section of heavy pipe and place it in the ground like a human picking up a piece of PVC piping.  You'd need oversized shovels, picks, hammers, and cutting tools.  A plasma torch, shop air (for compressed CO2 powered tools), and a bit driver kit are probably implements, too.

This is not a light piece of equipment and requires some maintenance support infrastructure.

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#5 2019-10-06 17:11:08

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,181

Re: Giant robots on Mars!

Paralyzed man able to walk with mind-controlled exoskeleton suit

A paralyzed man was able to walk using a mind-controlled robotic suit, French researchers report. The 30-year-old man, identified only as Thibault, moved all four of his paralyzed limbs using an exoskeleton controlled by his brain. The suit is controlled by two implants that were surgically placed on the surface of Thibault's brain. The implants cover parts of the brain that control movement and 64 electrodes from each implant read the brain activity.

109093441-clinatec-juliettetreillet.jpg

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