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#1 2018-08-26 15:12:26

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,239

NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

We really do not have a general unmanned missions folder so it goes here.
It is a 800 million dollar mission to get a sample of the early planetary system.
It has already been on an aproximate 2 year journey to catch its target.

Asteroid-Sampling NASA Probe Gets 1st Look at Its Target

Bennu will loom larger and larger in OSIRIS-REx's crosshairs over the next few months. If everything goes according to plan, the probe will arrive at the space rock on Dec. 3. It will perform a series of close flybys, taking measurements that will establish the asteroid's mass, and then begin circling Bennu on Dec. 31.

OSIRIS-REx will study Bennu from orbit for a while, and then spiral down to snag a sizable sample from the rock's surface in the middle of 2020. The spacecraft will depart Bennu in March 2021, and the sample, encased in a special return capsule, will parachute down to Earth in September 2023.

Bennu is a carbon-rich asteroid, the type that many scientists think delivered the chemical building blocks of life, along with lots of water, to our planet via impacts long ago. So, analyses of the returned sample in labs around the world could reveal key insights about the early solar system and the origin of life on Earth, mission team members have said.

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#2 2018-12-05 07:42:05

Void
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Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,479

Re: NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

So it has arrived, sort of pending orbit though.

https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2018/1 … 543933001/
Nice picture!  I think that general science missions like this are very important for calibrating our notions of reality.

Here is historical material generated in Aug. 8, 2013.  I think it is a good read.
https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/ne … -asteroids
This is of interest to me because it seems to say a lot about asteroid types.
It somewhat addresses the notion of contemplating mining asteroids.
Not a hot item to mine yet, the article indicates that Bennu is expected to have a content of Tar, and clay, which should contain water.  At the asteroid also, is expected a lot of Carbon and metals.
…..

On the topic of mining various places, I have had a thought progression.

1) Is it worth mining NEO's, or just going to the Moon if you want minerals.  (Or will SpaceX and others make it cheaper to bring up minerals from the Earth.

2) Then I got thinking about Phobos and Demos.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deimos_(moon)
Quote:

Physical characteristics[edit]

Deimos, like Mars's other moon, Phobos, has spectra, albedos, and densities similar to those of a C- or D-type asteroid[citation needed]. Like most bodies of its size, Deimos is highly non-spherical with triaxial dimensions of 15 × 12.2 × 11 km,[4] making it 56% of the size of Phobos. Deimos is composed of rock rich in carbonaceous material, much like C-type asteroids and carbonaceous chondrite meteorites[citation needed]. It is cratered, but the surface is noticeably smoother than that of Phobos, caused by the partial filling of craters with regolith[citation needed]. The regolith is highly porous and has a radar-estimated density of only 1.471 g/cm3.[16]
Escape velocity from Deimos is 5.6 m/s.[3] The apparent magnitude of Deimos is 12.45.[5]

There is also speculation that these two moons were formed by debris from an impact of Mars.  In which case I would have to wonder if they are wearing makeup powder from impacts from small "C" objects.  I just don't know.

I bet I am already upsetting the Mars direct people.  Don't worry.  Perhaps Phobos and Demos will have tars and clays.  But I am willing to "Go with the flow", and hope the SpaceX plan works as intended to access the surface of Mars.  Phobos and Demos can wait.

3) But....This is from 2013, so I don't know how its views are upheld at this point.  It holds that in some cases impact craters can hold the materials of the impactor in the central peak.  They are referring to the Moon also which of course does not have atmosphere to slow down objects at all.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/alie … -1.1317538
Quote:

It was believed any collision that big would melt or vaporize the impacting material, leaving behind only geochemical traces and tiny fragments.
However, Jay Melosh from Indiana's Purdue University and colleagues used computer simulations to show asteroids were capable of still producing these craters at lower impact speeds, giving them greater chance of survival.

"We find that for ... impact velocities below about 12 kilometres per second, the projectile may both survive the impact, and be swept back into the central peak of the final crater as it collapses," the authors write.
On Earth, spinel forms under high temperatures and pressures not seen near the moon's surface. It is also found in some asteroids and meteors.

Three possible deviations in favor of the survival of impactor minerals.

1) I would speculate that impactors will have a lower relative speed when impacting Mars, on average, because I expect the impactors to come from asteroid belts.

2) Mars has an atmosphere, which for smaller objects might help slow the impactor a bit before impact.

3) Mars has ice layers just under it's dust in a lot of areas.  The ice and dust should be soft, and also if there is to be vaporizing I would expect that ice would vaporize, sparing the impactor minerals.

So, I suppose one method of finding any such impactor remnants would be to look for proper sized craters where it is obvious ice exists.

For older impacts where the crater may have been erased, I suppose a wheeled robot sensing magnetic material would have to be used.

In the first case, though, then where a correct sized crater may reveal itself, mining may be worth the trouble.  Perhaps providing minerals not otherwise available.

Gotta go.  Maybe parts of this should go to Life Support later.

Last edited by Void (2018-12-05 08:09:52)


I like people who criticize angels dancing on a pinhead.  I also like it when angels dance on my pinhead.

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#3 2018-12-05 10:23:56

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
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Posts: 19,239

Re: NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

The speculations for what NEO's can only be answered by sending more probes to them. The science of our universes secrets are still being written. The knowledge gained will be much for its understanding and for its material resources that we can use as well journey away from Earth. These are important for man once he stops trying to send them from Earths gravity well.

We should be sending probes to the little moons of mars to do this same research and investigation into what they will and can be used for by man. Then finally to putting boots on there surfaces.

Man must find away to cooperate as we have with the ISS to make the world a better place and to be able to say that man can go; to live in peace amongst the planets, stars and all things in between.

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#4 2018-12-06 13:26:25

Void
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Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,479

Re: NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

Quote the Spacenut:

The speculations for what NEO's can only be answered by sending more probes to them. The science of our universes secrets are still being written. The knowledge gained will be much for its understanding and for its material resources that we can use as well journey away from Earth. These are important for man once he stops trying to send them from Earths gravity well.
We should be sending probes to the little moons of mars to do this same research and investigation into what they will and can be used for by man. Then finally to putting boots on there surfaces.
Man must find away to cooperate as we have with the ISS to make the world a better place and to be able to say that man can go; to live in peace amongst the planets, stars and all things in between.

That is a very excellent set of observations with a very respectable sentiment.  I concur.

……

Now, what other than propellants can BFR/BFS/Super Heavy/Starship do?

I am wondering if we could get some probes to the moons of Mars and maybe to asteroids, in conjunction with the SpaceX primary mission to Mars?

The last published edition of BFS indicated a cargo ring around the engines.  Maybe this or some other hold could eject probes for these purposes somewhere in route to Mars.

Cubesats would be the lowest cost.  Already explored by Insight.  For those, perhaps they would have shelter almost to Mars, and then do a flyby of the moons of Mars, or maybe even an impact of Phobos and/or Demos.  Perhaps rather cheap but maybe low quality data.  But still data.

Ideally they could somehow just do their thing before the cargo Starship begins it's aeroburn.  I am being optimistic, but maybe something like that could even do a radar sounding of the moons, and then impact the moons, and the Starship would be able to monitor the results.

Just trying to go as cheap as possible, and to hope for some further hints.

…..

But more expensive versions may be speculated on, presumably with better data gathering.

If you toss such probes out of the Starship, then you lighten it up for it's landing.

Elon Musk seems to indicate that a new version is coming, based apparently by some materials breakthroughs.  I presume this means a greater performance capability, so maybe some Martian moons, and asteroid probes????


Ended

Last edited by Void (2018-12-06 13:36:42)


I like people who criticize angels dancing on a pinhead.  I also like it when angels dance on my pinhead.

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#5 2018-12-10 18:23:13

Void
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Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,479

Re: NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

So, they say it's parent body had water, as they seem to have found clay.
https://www.space.com/42690-asteroid-be … overy.html
Quote:

The agency's OSIRIS-REx probe, which just arrived at Bennu last week, has already found hydrated minerals on the 1,640-foot-wide (500 meters) near-Earth asteroid, mission team members announced today (Dec. 10).


The discovery suggests that liquid water was once plentiful in the interior of Bennu's parent body, which scientists think was a roughly 62-mile-wide (100 kilometers) rock in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. (Bennu is likely a pile of rubble that coalesced after a massive impact shattered that larger object hundreds of millions of years ago.) [OSIRIS-REx: NASA's Asteroid-Sampling Mission in Pictures]

But Bennu is thought to be a rubble pile.  Pieces of the parent body in a pile of rubble.

Last edited by Void (2018-12-10 18:26:09)


I like people who criticize angels dancing on a pinhead.  I also like it when angels dance on my pinhead.

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#6 2019-01-01 19:59:05

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,239

Re: NASA's OSIRIS-REx probe to space rock Bennu

Nasa did it again Osiris-REX enters close orbit around asteroid Bennu

Inching around the asteroid at a snail's pace, OSIRIS-REx's first orbit marks a leap for humankind. Never before has a spacecraft from Earth circled so close to such a small space object - one with barely enough gravity to keep a vehicle in a stable orbit.

Now, the spacecraft will circle Bennu about a mile (1.75 kilometers) from its center, closer than any other spacecraft has come to its celestial object of study. The comfortable distance is necessary to keep the spacecraft locked to Bennu, which has a gravity force only 5-millionths as strong as Earth's. The spacecraft is scheduled to orbit Bennu through mid-February at a leisurely 62 hours per orbit.

https://www.asteroidmission.org/

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#7 2020-05-24 19:28:27

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,239

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