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#1 2004-11-12 08:34:39

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Click

*Dear European members of New Mars:  I've not yet seen posts relative to this mission.  Search indicates it's not been posted previously here either.  smile

I'm going to feel free, then, to post it. 

The mission is still in the planning stages, so the description in the article may change.  The lander portion of the mission has been cancelled due to "budgetary constraints."  (Darn.  sad  Where are those frickin' bored billionaries when you need them?).

Current planning is for a 2-component mission:  "...the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO)."

The scientific objectives for the mission are to study Mercury's form, interior structure, geology, composition, and craters, origin, structure, and dynamics of its magnetic field, composition and dynamics of the vestigial atmosphere, test Einstein's theory of general relativity, search for asteroids sunward of Earth, and to generally study the origin and evolution of a planet close to a parent star.

*Okay, by "search for asteroids sunward of Earth," I hope they mean *Vulcanoids*.  We already know there are asteroids in the inner Solar System.

Collaboration with Japanese Space Agency (ISAS) is being discussed; it might contribute a "Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter and exchange of hardware."

Lots of techy stuff.  I don't see a launch date.  "BepiColombo is named for Giusseppe (Bepi) Colombo (1920-1984), scientist, mathematician and engineer at the University of Padua, Italy."

They should have named it Voltaire.

Good luck with this!  Now the space exploration community has two Mercury missions in the works.  :up:

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#2 2004-11-13 04:15:44

remcook
Member
Registered: 2004-01-07
Posts: 78

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

i had to look up vulcanoids...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/m … 40126.html

But what I think they mean is, when Mercury is at opposition, it will look away from the Sun, to a region we can't see from Earth.

launch date is at the top of the article you posted (in boldface!  tongue  ): 2012

from ESA itself:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120391_index_0_m.html

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#3 2004-11-13 21:10:46

Yang Liwei Rocket
Member
Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

2012..darn that !
It's a very long time away, however i think its great they will use two craft,
two craft is always good cos if one fails there is always back up and aswell data and pics can be collected much better
the NASA twin Rovers have been doing great work on mars
and the China-ESA Double Star project TC-1 and TC-2 ( Explorer ) has also been doing very well
BepiColombo should be good. Gone will be the days when we just launch single probes into space, soon we may be launching fleets of craft to explore outerspace

yikes


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#4 2004-11-13 21:11:55

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,161

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

It is also part of the Messenger mission to aid in the search for them. Other efforts have been tried but with no success in finding them.
Other search turned up this older article also.
http://www.space.com/news/chasing_asteroids_000124.html

"These objects are zipping along faster than any bullet on Earth."

Is that really possible?

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#5 2004-11-13 21:38:50

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

launch date is at the top of the article you posted (in boldface!    ): 2012

:laugh:  (At least I knew what Vulcanoids are ...  tongue  yourself!   :;): )  But I'd better go get my eyes examined, to have missed something like that (good grief).  Thanks for pointing it out, remcook.  smile

Quote 
"These objects are zipping along faster than any bullet on Earth." 

Is that really possible?

*Great article, SpaceNut.  I posted one similar (but not the same) a while ago in one of the old "New Discoveries" threads, IIRC.  To answer your question:  I'll give scientists the benefit of the doubt that they wouldn't make such a bold-faced statement without some data supporting it (and no, I certainly don't purport to speak for them :-\ ). 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#6 2004-11-14 15:40:46

remcook
Member
Registered: 2004-01-07
Posts: 78

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

even rockets (or Earth orbiting satellites) go faster than bullets, so something that's passing Earth from a hyperbolic orbit (velocity is larger than the escape velocity) will definately go faster.

bullet speed: up to 1500 m/s:
http://hypertextbook.com/facts/1999/MariaPereyra.shtml

Earth orbits: up to 8000 m/s:
http://www.marsacademy.com/traj/traj5.htm

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#7 2005-08-04 16:16:01

Yang Liwei Rocket
Member
Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

some more info on it

Launch methods are presently under study.
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMLN5T1VED_index_0.html

scientific objectives
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object … ctid=31350


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#8 2005-08-05 14:40:42

Commodore
Member
From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Would a radar sweep be an effective method of searching for these vulcanoids>

Or would the Sun completely scrabble any data?


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#9 2005-08-05 16:01:17

Yang Liwei Rocket
Member
Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Would a radar sweep be an effective method of searching for these vulcanoids>

Or would the Sun completely scrabble any data?

Some have though that there may be a Vulcanoid rock region inside the orbit of Mercury, although neither Mariner missions nor the NASA/ESA Soho have found anything

Gaia might be the mission for this it will measure Galaxies, extra-solar planets, do a 3d map of a billion suns and also Gaia is able to view the 'blind spot' found between the Sun and Earth's orbit and from Earth, we can only observe this area during the daytime one group known as the Atens could be dangerous, maybe it can also look for evidence of the existence these Vulcanoids.

http://www.astronomytoday.com/exploration/gaia.html
here is the new-mars Gaia thread
http://www.newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1443

Bepi-Colombo looks like it may be a joint ESA and Japanese mission. Just as MESSENGER is arriving at Mercury, ESA's BepiColombo mission will be lifting off the launch pad.


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#10 2006-02-16 08:29:28

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Update on BepiColombo

*2013 as prospective launch year. 

Finland is really getting involved.  Sounds good.  smile

Hopefully some former funding issues have been resolved.  Not that we can expect any of our wonderful zillionaire friends to help out with a science mission...(no $$$$ in it for them, no dice).   roll

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#11 2006-02-17 02:52:51

Rxke
Member
From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,658

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Not that we can expect any of our wonderful zillionaire friends to help out with a science mission...(no $$$$ in it for them, no dice).   roll

Offtopic: Ever heard of the Allen telescope? BiosphereII ?  These things do happen, I seriously so do not like Bill Gates, but even he donates lotsa money on science (drugresearch)


ExoMars' launcher's 2nd stage is probably en route to Mars. Unsterilised... yikes

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#12 2006-02-17 06:28:03

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Offtopic: Ever heard of the Allen telescope? BiosphereII ?

*Yes.  Allen Telescope Array -- another recent article at space.com.  Can't resist giving them a poke, though.  There isn't enough help for some projects which could benefit from generous private donations; more could be done/given (refer to 1st post in the thread).

As for Gates, I don't follow his philanthropy closely, but it's mostly for humanitarian causes...not space.  Which is fine (humanitarian); just saying.

Back on topic...

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#13 2007-02-25 06:41:08

EuroLauncher
Member
From: Europe
Registered: 2005-10-19
Posts: 299

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

News

The European Space Agency
Aviation Week & Space Technology
02/05/2007, page 17

The European Space Agency will split a €329-million ($424.4-million) prime contract for Bepi Colombo Mercury mission, the agency's next major science project, between Astrium and Alcatel Alenia Space. Astrium Germany will be overall prime contractor, with Astrium U.K. and Alcatel Alenia Italy as co-primes, says Jacques Louet, ESA's director of science projects. But Astrium Germany will shoulder the full program risk under a "political expedient" approved last week by ESA's industrial policy committee. The green light for the €665-million mission is to be given by ESA's science program board later this month, along with a call for ideas for the next round of science missions planned for 2015-25. Three large (€650-million) and three medium (€300-million) missions are expected to be proposed for the tender, expected to be realized in October. The first, a medium mission, would be launched around 2017. To ensure approval, Louet said, science planners will propose €200 million in cuts through 2015. The bulk of the savings--€110 million--will come by offering to merge ESA's Solar Orbiter mission with NASA's four-satellite Sentinel project, eliminating one Sentinel and carrying the four remaining units aloft on the same launcher, with shared instrument packages.

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#14 2007-02-25 14:46:50

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Good to see ESA going ahead with more science missions, hopefully they will choose some original projects this time.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#15 2007-10-18 06:45:08

EuroLauncher
Member
From: Europe
Registered: 2005-10-19
Posts: 299

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Cool animations: Critical operations for BepiColombo

BepiColombo - ESA's first mission to Mercury - will be conducted in cooperation with JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and is scheduled for launch later in 2013. Scroll down to view a series of highly detailed, realistic animations showing the critical operational phases.

The mission will consist of two separate spacecraft: ESA is building the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), and the Japanese space agency JAXA will contribute the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). MPO mission operations will be controlled from ESOC, the European Space Operations Centre, while MMO operations will be controlled from the Sagamihara Space Operation Center, near Tokyo.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/ … S7F_0.html

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#16 2008-01-12 00:07:10

Yang Liwei Rocket
Member
Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

"ESA PR 3-2008. The European Space Agency and Astrium jointly invite the media to attend a press conference on the occasion of the industrial contract signature of BepiColombo, the first European mission to Mercury. The event will be held at Astrium Friedrichshafen on 18 January 2008."
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM7C83MDAF_index_0.html


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#17 2016-07-24 17:55:40

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,161

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

I knew the name of the mission was familar and that we had a topic for it....
Fixed artifacts and minor shifting.....

BepiColombo Mission to Mercury on Track for April 2018 Launch

"BepiColombo is on track for launch in 2018. At the moment we are preparing for some final acceptance tests. On our 'Mercury Transport Module' (MTM) we need to finish the installation of some late deliveries and then the module has to undergo a thermal verification and thermal balance test. This is to proof that the thermal shielding of this spacecraft module works as predicted by the models," Johannes Benkhoff, BepiColombo project scientist at ESA, told Astrowatch.net.

Similar tests have been already conducted for all the other modules of BepiColombo. After the MTM thermal test the engineers will have to perform a mechanical verification test of all the units together. This is to proof that BepiColombo will be able to survive the vibrations during the launch of the spacecraft. The vibration test is foreseen to be performed in early 2017.

After all these tests, BepiColombo will be shipped to the launch site in Kourou, French Guiana, from where it will be launched in April 2018.

This is a 2 for 1 mission launch....

The mission will consist of two separate spacecraft that will orbit the small rocky planet. ESA developed the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), and JAXA provided the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). MPO will study the surface and internal composition of the planet, while the MMO will study Mercury's magnetosphere.

BepiColombo will be launched by ESA's Ariane 5 booster on a direct escape trajectory to Venus. During its journey to the solar system's smallest planet it perform two gravity assists of Venus and four gravity assists of Mercury. The mission is expected to arrive at Mercury in December 2024 and to operate until May 2026.

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#18 2017-07-08 09:29:12

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,161

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

This joint European-Japanese venture has been in development for nearly two decades, but should finally get to the launch pad in 15 months' time.
Europe's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and Japan's Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO)

BepiColombo to Uncover Mercury's Mysteries

BepiColombo: Joint Mercury mission ready for 'pizza oven'

ESA’s BepiColombo Mercury mission thrives on ambition and co-operation

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#19 2018-11-03 08:10:45

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,161

Re: BepiColombo - ESA/JAXA Mercury Orbiters

Wow topic is really old and goes to show just how long mission hardware can take to be made...

BepiColombo is a joint mission of the European Space Agency and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency to the planet Mercury. The mission comprises two satellites launched together: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter and Mio. The mission will perform a comprehensive study of Mercury, including characterization of its magnetic field, magnetosphere, and both interior and surface structure.

It was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket on 20 October 2018 at 01:45 UTC, with an arrival at Mercury planned for December 2025, after a flyby of Earth, two flybys of Venus, and six flybys of Mercury.

The mission was approved in November 2009, after years in proposal and planning as part of the European Space Agency's Horizon 2000+ programme; it is the last mission of the programme to be launched.

BepiColombo set to explore our smallest, wrinkliest planet

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