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#26 2018-05-05 19:27:40

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 12,701

Re: Mars InSight lander

The launcher cost is some where in the 160 million neighborhood with they remaining was probe and a 2 year plus repair costs as noted in post 1 InSight's cost is projected to be approximately $480 million

The extra $150 million would bust the project's current cost cap of $675 million and likely delay other projects. NASA already had spent about $525 million on InSight when work was suspended.

But I agree that its pricey even for Nasa....

I am sure once main mission requirements are reached that extensions will be funded unti it stops working or is not giving up any more data of value....

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#27 2018-05-07 19:45:47

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 12,701

Re: Mars InSight lander

Satellites WALL-E and EVE Are Hitching a Ride to Mars, Twin briefcase-sized satellites will pop out after launch and accompany InSight, providing a communications link

5-4-2018-cubesats-insight.jpg

Similar in size to a briefcase or large cereal box, the satellites with pop out from the rocket's upper stage following liftoff and hightail it to Mars, right behind InSight.

It will be the first time little cube-shaped satellites, CubeSats as they're known, set sail for deep space. The journey will span 6 1/2 months and 300 million miles.

A brief look at the $18.5 million experiment tagging along with InSight:

Once free from the rocket's upper stage following liftoff, WALL-E and EVE will trail a few thousand miles behind InSight en route to Mars. The two mini spacecraft will also be a few thousand milesapart from one another. That's to prevent any collisions or even close calls. While that may seem far apart, it's actually fairly close by space standards, according to Brian Clement, an engineer on the project at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. While InSight will be stopping at Mars on Nov. 26, WALL-E and EVE will zoom past the planet from about 2,200 miles out.

All has gone as planned as NASA's Tiny, Mars-Bound Satellites Have Successfully Signaled Home

Called MarCO-A and MarCO-B, the tiny machines have already passed the first important milestone in their groundbreaking mission to the Red Planet.

When MarCO-A and MarCO-B arrive at Mars later this year, they’ll be the smallest machines to ever visit another planet.

Known as nanosatellites, these devices weigh a mere 30 pounds each, and measure just 14.4 inches by 9.5 inches by 4.6 inches when packed into a rocket’s cargo hold.

Once at Mars, the tiny satellites will provide a communications link with stations on Earth as InSight makes its perilous entry to the surface.

The goal of the CubeSats is a proof-of-concept mission to test the viability of sending small satellites to the outer reaches of the Solar System.

NASA scientists are using the mission to understand if and how CubeSats can work in deep space, testing their endurance and navigational abilities. Should all go well, NASA can start to think about similar missions to other Solar System bodies, such as the outer gas planets and possibly even the Kuiper Belt.

Solar will not work out there thou as that will require nuclear powered systems to make it a possibility.

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#28 2018-08-01 19:28:18

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 12,701

Re: Mars InSight lander

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InSight

Lander specifications

Mass

    Total: 694 kg (1,530 lb)[2]
        Lander: 358 kg (789 lb)[2]
        Aeroshell: 189 kg (417 lb)[2]
        Cruise stage: 79 kg (174 lb)[2]
        Propellant and pressurant: 67 kg (148 lb)[2]
    Mars Cube One CubeSats: 13.5 kg (30 lb) each[2]

Dimensions
    About 6.0 m (19.7 ft) wide with solar panels deployed. The science deck is about 1.56 m (5.1 ft) wide and between 0.83 and 1.08 m (2.7 and 3.5 ft) high (depending on leg compression after landing).[2] The length of the robotic arm is 2.4 m (7.9 ft)[2]

Power
    Power is generated by two round solar panels, each 2.15 m (7.1 ft) in diameter and consisting of SolAero ZTJ triple-junction solar cells made of InGaP/InGaAs/Ge arranged on Orbital ATK UltraFlex arrays. After touchdown on the Martian surface, the arrays are deployed by opening like a folding fan

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#29 2018-08-05 11:20:21

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 12,701

Re: Mars InSight lander

The heatshield on this was changed out as it had cracked in testing but for mars the lander is still gots its chances that it still could fail to land.
NASA makes flying to Mars look easy, but cross your fingers for InSight anyway; Newest spacecraft will burrow into Mars, but it must first get there safely.

The InSight lander builds on the design of NASA's Mars Phoenix lander, which touched down in 2008. It will use a combination of parachutes and then 12 descent engines to slow from an atmospheric entry velocity of 6.3km/second.  After landing, InSight will spend about two months slowly deploying and testing its 2.4-meter robotic arm and scientific instruments. It will then begin its science activities. The heat probe is scheduled to deploy and begin burrowing into the Martian soil about 17 weeks after landing. The prime mission is scheduled to last about two years. The seismometer itself worked fine, but several times during 2015, engineers found a leak in the 22cm sphere that creates a vacuum so that the instrument can function on the harsh surface of Mars. Their temporary fixes didn't address the problem. NASA now says the problem has been fixed.

The fact that Nasa has made the last eight rovers, landers, and orbiters it has sent to Mars and we take for granted that everything on a mission like this will work.

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#30 2018-10-10 08:10:56

tahanson43206
Member
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 20

Re: Mars InSight lander

In another topic, kbd512 pointed out that in scouting out potential landing sites for C130 aircraft in unprepared terrain, it was occasionally appropriate to send individuals to the potential site to pound stakes into the soil as a way of collecting data about the soil (to characterize the soil).

The Insight lander will use an electric hammer (as described earlier in this topic) to deliver a probe to a point below the surface. What is NOT clear (to me) at this point, is whether the Insight engineering team will be collecting data about the soil the probe will be entering, AND if that data will be provided to potential landing site planners.

Nasa has set up a primitive AI system at Ask NASA Mars.  It is not a shining example of anywhere near Alexa level, for sure.

Begin Quotation:
My name is ROV-E. I am a real robot with a computer brain. I'm learning to talk. Every question you ask helps me learn. If I don't know the answer yet, Mars scientists and engineers will teach me more answers for you.
End Quotation.

Begin Quotation of response:
ROV-E: If you were asking: Thanks, the answer is: You're welcome!
End Quotation.

What I'm hoping is that questions ROVE-E cannot answer will be reviewed by a member of the Insight Team.

I've invited them to open a membership on the NewMars.com forum, to facilitate immediate communication with members of this community.

https://mars.nasa.gov/ask-nasa-mars/#/

(th)

Last edited by tahanson43206 (2018-10-10 09:02:41)

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#31 2018-10-12 05:22:56

elderflower
Member
Registered: 2016-06-19
Posts: 879

Re: Mars InSight lander

Then, maybe, we shall have to avoid mentioning NASAs shortcomings so as to prevent its engineers from being banned from using this site by NASA management or their political masters.

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#32 2018-10-12 16:31:18

GW Johnson
Member
From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 3,190
Website

Re: Mars InSight lander

I hope that both Spacex and NASA people visit this site.  They will find good questions being asked,  and some good ideas. 

GW


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#33 2018-10-12 18:26:08

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 12,701

Re: Mars InSight lander

I could not agree more and remember back when Hubble need to be rescued and shuttle needed a second shuttle or safe haven to be used. I had email the then director with a concept to use the return portion of a soyuz in the shuttle bay as a safe haven return if the shuttle had been damage while going to the hubble to make its repairs. It was presented to a tiger team as an option but back then we were not making use of them for flights to the station so they were not likely to lend one for the purpose.

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