New Mars Forums

Official discussion forum of The Mars Society and MarsNews.com

You are not logged in.

Announcement

Announcement: We've recently made changes to our user database and have removed inactive and spam users. If you can not login, please re-register.

#1 2007-01-07 22:05:42

Commodore
Member
From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

Scientist: NASA found life on Mars - and killed it

n the 1970s, the Viking mission found no signs of life.

But it was looking for Earth-like life, in which salt water is the internal liquid of living cells.

Given the cold dry conditions of Mars, life could have evolved on Mars with the key internal fluid consisting of a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide, said Schulze-Makuch.

That's because a water-hydrogen peroxide mix stays liquid at very low temperatures, or -68 degrees Fahrenheit, and doesn't destroy cells when it freezes. It can suck water vapor out of the air.

The Viking experiments of the 1970s wouldn't have noticed hydrogen peroxide-based life and, in fact, would have killed it by drowning and overheating the microbes, said Schulze-Makuch.

An interesting idea. One that may not be properly answered untill we put a good microscope on the planet.


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

Offline

#2 2007-01-07 22:38:41

John Creighton
Member
From: Nova Scotia, Canada
Registered: 2001-09-04
Posts: 2,401
Website

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

Indeed. A very interesting theory.

Offline

#3 2007-01-08 22:33:54

Number04
Member
From: Calgary Alberta Canada
Registered: 2002-09-24
Posts: 162

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

Well,  "life" as we know it is really narrow. Alien is exactly what it means. Things that we don't know. There is no "earth" life on mars, but there could be others.

Offline

#4 2018-07-18 20:05:23

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,475

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

NASA May Have Destroyed Evidence for Organics on Mars 40 Years Ago

viking-1-lander-dug-trenches-mars-collect-samples-hg.jpg

While the existence of native carbon-based organic compounds on the Red Planet was confirmed only in 2014, some suggest that the discovery could have been made a long time ago.

Back in 1976, NASA's twin Viking landers touched down on Mars to find out if life could survive on Mars and whether there was organic matter in the Martian soil. Researchers were puzzled as no evidence for organic molecules were found, because they believed that organics had been delivered to the planet by carbon-rich meteorites.

"It was just completely unexpected and inconsistent with what we knew," Chris McKay of NASA's Ames Research Center told New Scientist.

So much for the rover that just suffered a deadth in the recent dust storm as that was what it had also detected....

Offline

#5 2018-07-18 21:10:32

M-Albion-3D
Member
From: Malibu CA
Registered: 2018-05-02
Posts: 68
Website

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

SpaceNut wrote:

NASA May Have Destroyed Evidence for Organics on Mars 40 Years Ago

http://www.spxdaily.com/images-hg/vikin … les-hg.jpg

While the existence of native carbon-based organic compounds on the Red Planet was confirmed only in 2014, some suggest that the discovery could have been made a long time ago.

Back in 1976, NASA's twin Viking landers touched down on Mars to find out if life could survive on Mars and whether there was organic matter in the Martian soil. Researchers were puzzled as no evidence for organic molecules were found, because they believed that organics had been delivered to the planet by carbon-rich meteorites.

"It was just completely unexpected and inconsistent with what we knew," Chris McKay of NASA's Ames Research Center told New Scientist.

So much for the rover that just suffered a deadth in the recent dust storm as that was what it had also detected....


It's easy to understand why all the monitor screens at Mission Control were all turned to the red hue. Good heavens, can you imagine if true color images of the surface were let loose on the streets of earth, people would be lining up to  take a vacation!

From the late thirties, the ruse (rouge) was to be maintained at all costs!

0sqGzg.jpg

BzLZeZ.jpg

Offline

#6 2018-07-19 04:57:02

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 5,368

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

Could that explain the "water droplets" on the polar lander?

Commodore wrote:

Scientist: NASA found life on Mars - and killed it

n the 1970s, the Viking mission found no signs of life.

But it was looking for Earth-like life, in which salt water is the internal liquid of living cells.

Given the cold dry conditions of Mars, life could have evolved on Mars with the key internal fluid consisting of a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide, said Schulze-Makuch.

That's because a water-hydrogen peroxide mix stays liquid at very low temperatures, or -68 degrees Fahrenheit, and doesn't destroy cells when it freezes. It can suck water vapor out of the air.

The Viking experiments of the 1970s wouldn't have noticed hydrogen peroxide-based life and, in fact, would have killed it by drowning and overheating the microbes, said Schulze-Makuch.

An interesting idea. One that may not be properly answered untill we put a good microscope on the planet.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

Offline

#7 2018-07-19 19:11:13

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,475

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

The water droplets on the polar lander legs was from the exhaust heat from landing evaporating in large quantity the moisture in the soil.

Offline

#8 2018-09-06 14:08:50

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 1,798

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

One of my old professional (biochemist) colleagues sent me this as a forward. I'm reposting it here as it fits in with the views I hold regarding why NASA is so utterly disinterested in Mars.

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-06- … -1976.html

Offline

#9 2018-09-06 17:55:20

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 5,368

Re: Did the Vikings find life...

I agree that "It’s very hard to image a sterile Mars.”  It's much easier to imagine a sterile surface on Mars  with life existing in subterranean pockets. But even that is pretty tenuous.

I tend to think that Mars is still in the "goldilocks" zone where life is highly probable...It might not appear like that to us since it seems so hostile to us as human beings.  Yet, even the most extreme environments harbour life on Earth e.g the North Pole (not so sure about the South Pole...).  We have extremophile organisms on Earth that could survive Martian conditions...We know there have been probably millions (billions?) of exchanges of regolith between Earth and Mars and vice versa thanks to big meteorite impacts  over the passage of time since the solar system was first created.  We know Mars still have plenty of water, has liquid water now and has ice. We know creatures live in ice on Earth...How likely is it that there is absolutely NO life on Mars? Seems very unlikely to me.





Oldfart1939 wrote:

One of my old professional (biochemist) colleagues sent me this as a forward. I'm reposting it here as it fits in with the views I hold regarding why NASA is so utterly disinterested in Mars.

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-09-06- … -1976.html


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB