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#376 2018-06-06 21:29:47

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 13,356

Re: Venus

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NASA has a plan to let humans soar above the clouds on Venus; Proposed "HAVOC" mission would send a blimp-like airship to Earth's nearest neighbor.

We worked out that a small rocket with a living area to do work in venus under such a large blimp at the temporate zone and pressure would not only yield some great science but would give another place to go to.

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https://sacd.larc.nasa.gov/smab/havoc/

The team has sketched out plans for and conducted small-scale tests of a blimp-like airship that would ferry a crew of two on a month-long expedition above the Venusian cloudtops. It would begin with two launches to Venus. One spacecraft would be for the crew. The other would be a robotic cargo ship carrying the airship, which would be folded up inside a 100-foot-long capsule. The voyage from Earth to Venus would take about 100 days using a powerful rocket like NASA's upcoming Space Launch System.

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Falling from orbit, the capsule would plunge into Venus's atmosphere at 16,000 mph. White-hot atmospheric friction and a huge supersonic parachute would slow things to a more manageable 90 mph. At that point, the capsule would jettison its outer shell, the airship would unfurl, and canisters of helium would inflate it to a volume of 2.7 million cubic feet.

At the conclusion of the 30-day mission, the capsule would detach from the airship and transport the astronauts back into orbit around Venus. There they would rendezvous with the main crew vessel, which would take them back to Earth. The return trip would take a bit longer — about 300 days — because the rocket would have to fight the sun's gravitational attraction. But at a total length of about 450 days, the mission would be significantly shorter than a mission to Mars, which could take a full two years.

If we were to stay longer in venus atmosphere we could even do insitu fuel for the rocket and trade that mass for supplies without changing the base levels of the mission as the amount of supplies would be a good portion of the mass for the people to survive versus the fully fueled rocket.

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#377 2018-06-07 00:37:03

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 2,221

Re: Venus

It really is an intriguing idea, but I fail to see the point in sending humans into the atmosphere for a 30 day high stakes joy ride.  Sending an ITV to LVO packed with lots of microprobes, robotic ISRU experiments, and powerful high resolution radars could help us understand a bit more about the planet's atmosphere and surface composition.  In some ways, it's easier to live there than Mars.

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#378 2018-06-07 05:23:19

Terraformer
Member
From: Lancashire
Registered: 2007-08-27
Posts: 2,903
Website

Re: Venus

I'm not comfortable with the idea of relying on the airship to unfurl in order to avoid crashing, particularly not at 90mph in a dense atmosphere. I'd send the airship down first, and have the people follow in a spaceplane of some kind. We know it's possible to dock planes with airships, even though we haven't done so for decades.


"I guarantee you that at some point, everything's going to go south on you, and you're going to say, 'This is it, this is how I end.' Now you can either accept that, or you can get to work." - Mark Watney

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#379 2018-06-07 16:46:21

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 13,356

Re: Venus

kbd512 the early stages are on a first mission is survival with science, insitu manufacturing of fuel & Oxygen, solving the food supply chain and gardening for longer missions, probe the atmophere a little bit lower over time via planes, gliders, blimps. yes probe for better ground radar views, yes test microbial life at each step of going towards the surface and give it a means to prosper.

Terraformer the unfurling will be fully tested before going to venus to be sure that men will be safe as we can test it here with dropping to the jet stream level to get all the data on performance of design.

The original concept we were taling about was a pagasus sized rocket for return to orbit for the blimp to make use of for the crews flight home with a genesis or beam sized inflatable to couple to for the crew to stay in.

All but for a few key technology and design builds all seems just about ready all but for the sub assmbly or heavy lift.

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#380 2018-06-08 01:54:05

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 2,221

Re: Venus

SpaceNut,

I think we should characterize atmospheric chemical composition, pressures, and temperatures before committing human lives.  Fundamental accurate knowledge of what's in the atmosphere is crucial to survival.  Asteroid mining could make water available to future Venusians for agriculture.  There's supposedly enough sulfuric acid to combine with CO2 to make water, but more data is required.

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#381 2018-06-08 19:33:14

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 13,356

Re: Venus

So do a test flight with a scaled down version that allows for a sample return of atmosphere and testing data for materials that would be best within venus atmosphere and then take the heals out of the quick sand and lets get going to the planet for a faster level of research as to what man can make venus a new earth in time or are we destine to die out on earth....

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