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#76 2005-05-24 19:47:39

Stephen
Member
Registered: 2004-01-16
Posts: 68

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

The Planetary Society's website has posted a longish article (Voyager 1 Enters Final Frontier of Solar System as NASA Considers Termination) on the Voyager funding matter filled with lots of juicy details.

Amongst other things, it reports that team members have told the annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, that the Voyager 1 has crossed the termination shock and is now in the heliosheath.


======
Stephen

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#77 2005-05-26 06:25:58

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

Audio of V1!

*A scientist has posted, on the net, sounds recently obtained from Voyager 1 (termination shock region).

He speculates it'll take yet another 10 years for Voyager 1 to be completely free of the Solar System.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#78 2005-06-02 12:50:49

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

Great stuff that we are learning from the voyagers.

I did not want to start a new thread for Nasa cancellation or early retirement of probes or satelites.
Leading theories of cosmic explosions contradicted indicates that the High Energy Transient Explorer-2 satellites.

Observations of a cosmic explosion detected on Feb. 15 by two NASA satellites have thrown into doubt one popular explanation for such explosions and have also seriously weakened the argument for yet another, according to University of Chicago astrophysicist Don Lamb. But solving the mystery any time soon may be forestalled by plans to shut down one of the satellites in September.

Which includes the Swift Xray, regular gamma-ray bursts and such that are all produced by the collapse of massive stars and probably the creation of black holes.

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#79 2005-09-23 05:56:23

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

Thanks Cindy for referencing this thread in your NASA: Please DON'T Ax the Voyager Mission!! poll.

Fron this news NASA gets wind of new solar details we must assume that the funding did stay intact even if only for a short while longer.

Readings collected by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft as it passed through the zone on its way to interstellar space in December show that the intensity of low-energy particles and magnetic fields increases sharply at the frontier.

The termination shock doesn't perform as we expected," he wrote. "It is clear that it is a shock, but not the prodigious accelerator [of the high-energy particles] that we expected.

Scientists think the small nuclear generators on the craft could last another 15 years. When those fail, the Voyagers won't be able to collect or transmit data.

Wow another 15 years of possible collection of data and transmission. Can we even recieve such a weak signal?

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#80 2006-02-16 07:33:35

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

Long ago launched but not forgotten.

A new study may help lead to an explanation of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft anomalies.  The two crafts were launched in 1972 and 1973 respectively, and are now at the outskirts of the solar system.

Dark Matter Energy is Hydrogen - Speed and Temperature Help Explains Pioneer Anomalies

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#81 2007-08-22 20:47:45

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

The little probes that could....
Voyager spacecraft far exceed JPL's expectations

When Ed Massey became JPL's project manager for the Voyager spacecraft, he didn't expect to hold the post for long.

At that time, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 - which were only planned to last five years - were almost about to turn 20.

"When we reached the 25th anniversary, I was amazed that the spacecraft had been flying that long and nothing had caused a detrimental failure," Massey said.

That was five years ago.

This week, Voyager 2 marked its 30th year in space. Voyager 1 will turn 30 on Sept. 5.

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#82 2007-12-17 11:57:42

cIclops
Member
Registered: 2005-06-16
Posts: 3,230

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

204927main_VoyagerDiagram.jpg

Voyager 2 Proves Solar System Is Squashed - 10 Dec 2007

San Francisco, CA. - NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft has followed its twin Voyager 1 into the solar system's final frontier, a vast region at the edge of our solar system where the solar wind runs up against the thin gas between the stars.

However, Voyager 2 took a different path, entering this region, called the heliosheath, on August 30, 2007. Because Voyager 2 crossed the heliosheath boundary, called the solar wind termination shock, about 10 billion miles away from Voyager 1 and almost a billion miles closer to the sun, it confirmed that our solar system is " squashed" or " dented"- that the bubble carved into interstellar space by the solar wind is not perfectly round. Where Voyager 2 made its crossing, the bubble is pushed in closer to the sun by the local interstellar magnetic field.


Let's go to Mars and far beyond -  triple NASA's budget !   #space channel !!    - videos !!!

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#83 2017-07-15 10:29:57

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

Pioneer 10: first probe to leave the inner solar system & precursor to Juno

Screen-Shot-2017-07-14-at-13.42.29-350x260.png

The final signal received from Pioneer 10 arrived on Earth through the Deep Space Network on 23 January 2003 from a distance of ~82.2 AU.

All further attempts to contact the spacecraft were unsuccessful, with the final attempt made on 4 March 2006 – 34 years and 1 day after the craft left Earth on its historic mission.

Today, Pioneer 10 – assuming it hasn’t collided with anything – is ~118.5 AU from the sun and is travelling outward at 2.54 AU per year.

It is currently the second farthest human-made object from the sun – a position it will hold until April 2019 when Voyager 2 overtakes it.

If left undisturbed, Pioneer 10’s trajectory will take it in the general direction of Aldebaran.

A21.jpg

There has been some debate as to did it leave our solar system or not.

Z36.jpg

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#84 2017-12-02 14:52:59

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,650

Re: Voyager - Interstellar mission

I see that the topic needs some fixing....

“The Voyager flight team dug up decades-old data and examined the software that was coded in an outdated assembler language, to make sure we could safely test the thrusters,”

So what's up with this as  Rocket blast from the past: Voyager 1 fires thrusters last used in 1980

Voyager 1 is over 13 billion miles (nearly 21 billion kilometers) from Earth with it's sibling craft, Voyager 2, is 10.8 billion miles (over 17 million kilometers) from Earth and will likely undergo a similar procedure, though per NASA, its main thruster set is in better condition.

WoW.... 40 years and still ticking but the space crafts’ power sources are estimated to run dry around 2025, at which point they will no longer be reachable.

Launched 40 years ago, 1977, the twin spacecrafts Voyager 1 and 2 were launched, 16 days apart.

It is expected that in the year 40,272, Voyager 1 will come within 1.7 light years of an obscure star in the constellation Ursa Minor (the Little Bear or Little Dipper) and in about 40,000 years, Voyager 2 will come within about 1.7 light years of a star called Ross 248, a small star in the constellation of Andromeda.

NASA fired up Voyager 1’s backup thrusters for the first time in 37 years

BBG36r1.img?h=486&w=728&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

NASA is getting really good at squeezing every last bit of life out of its hardware. It recently extended the Dawn spacecraft’s mission over Ceres for a second time, while New Horizons is on its way to check out a small icy body called 2014 MU69 in January 2019.

Finally in this article the thrusters are to steer the probe for transmission back to earth as they are simular to the others which are showing wear....

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