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#101 2005-03-25 09:36:14

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Europa

Preparing for Europa

*That was the tagline for the article at spaceref.com, though not an actual part of the story.  But will put it here anyway.

The little craft is called "Spray."  It was launched 12 miles SE of Bermuda, is heading NW, will return to Bermuda.  Is 6 feet in length, 4 foot wingspan, weighing 112 pounds, traveling 12 mph day, has no visible moving parts and has a range of 3500 miles!  Wow.  Is its 2nd trip across the Gulf Stream.

The Little AUV That Could. 

cool

measuring various properties of the ocean as it glides up to the surface and then glides back down to 1,000-meters depth (3,300 feet) three times a day. Every seven hours Spray spends about 15 minutes on the surface to relay its position and information about ocean conditions, such as temperature, salinity and pressure

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#102 2005-04-22 09:00:44

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Europa

Europa's Ice Rafts

*Just found this at Astropix.  big_smile  Shows shifts -- pieces of the surface have "rafted to new locations."  More speculation of water, of course.  Is an "old" photo from April 1997, but a definite must-post.

--Cindy

P.S.:  The "raft" towards the upper right-hand corner looks like it's been broken in half.  Or perhaps it's two separate "rafts" pushed together, and the one to the right is higher than its companion on the left; a shadowing effect?  ???


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#103 2005-07-26 15:06:59

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Europa

Crater on ice...

*Check it out.  As in April, found it while fishing in Astropix.  A strange "something" for a robotic mission to try and figure out.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#104 2017-02-11 23:13:54

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Europa

Giving this one a bump to be able to find it for repairs

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#105 2017-09-07 17:00:05

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Europa

Wow just found this topic again and its was not fixed boy did I fall asleep at the wheel or what.

NASA studying less expensive options for Europa lander mission planners are continuing to examine several factors, including mission cost and science return, as they evaluate the design of the mission.  “We want to continue balancing the trade amongst risk, cost and science return.”

europalander.jpg

Concepts for the lander presented earlier this year call for a spacecraft launched on a Space Launch System rocket no earlier than late 2025, arriving at Jupiter in mid-2030 and landing on Europa in late 2031. Most of the spacecraft’s estimated mass of 16.6 metric tons is propellant needed to first enter orbit around Jupiter and, later, landing on Europa itself

No wonder they are trying to find a cheaper build...

Plus this change as well from a nuclear power source to

science goals of the lander, as well as a notional suite of five instruments that could be used to achieve those goals and fit within a payload accommodation on the lander of 42.5 kilograms. The battery-powered spacecraft would operate for about 20 days after landing.

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#106 2017-09-08 01:05:58

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 866

Re: Europa

This mission would NOT seem to be a very good return on the investment needed; at least not NOW. Maybe after NASA returns to using Nuclear Thermal propulsion systems with double the Isp of H2/LOX?

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#107 2017-09-08 01:08:03

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 866

Re: Europa

The key to such missions is the science return. With only 42 kg of instruments with a possible lifetime of 20 days, there doesn't seem to be much that could be accomplished.

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