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#1 2016-04-26 20:34:43

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,690

Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

Got digging around to find out what Nasa had on its official plate.

Found the very dated article NASA may aim for Venus for future missions Planet is similar to Earth in terms of atmosphere, climate, researcher says updated 7/30/2010

Found the Nasa web site which was talking about future missions of the possibility of sending the Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging (DAVINCI) spacecraft to the planet by the 2020s.

http://www.universetoday.com/122719/the … pacecraft/
http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2016/pdf/1560.pdf
http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2016/pdf/2566.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DAVINCI_%28spacecraft%29

The first is the DAVINCI spacecraft, which would study the chemical composition of Venus’ atmosphere. Meanwhile, the proposed VERITAS mission – or The Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography, and Spectroscopy spacecraft – would investigate the planet’s surface to determine just how much it has in common with Earth, and whether or not it was ever habitable.

http://www.universetoday.com/122745/the … h-veritas/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VERITAS_(spacecraft)

As meantion in other topics these missions are contending for funding under the budget guide lines of Discovery and New Frontier with Flagship being the highest of level...DAVINCI & VERITAS were selected on 30 September 2015 as one of five semifinalists to become Mission #13 of NASA’s Discovery Program from the original 27 submissions for further investigation and refinement.

I was surprised to not see the mission Known at NASA as HAVOC - High Altitude Venus Operational Concept - engineers and scientists at the Systems Analysis and Concepts Directorate at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, have been working on a preliminary feasibility study on how robots and humans could make a Venus mission a reality.

This could be the view for a manned mission
venus-big-pic-2014-12-22-01.jpg

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#2 2016-04-27 20:37:53

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,690

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

Nasa is currently cash constrained in each years budgets year and when push comes to shove the selection process is getting hard to select a venus mission over seeing one for mars....

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#3 2016-04-27 21:39:58

Tom Kalbfus
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Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 4,401

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

venera13-left.jpg?1353363094?interpolation=lanczos-none&downsize=640:*
You think by now we could send a probe that could take better pictures than this.
venera13-right.jpg?1353363147?interpolation=lanczos-none&downsize=640:*
Or this, the camera looks down on the ground, and we only get a tiny corner of the Venusian sky, rather poor photography, I'd say. You think we can do better than this? So far the only ones to send probes to the Surface of Venus are the defunct Soviets, and nothing has gone there since. How about a mission like that Titan lander, one that takes pictures on the way down? Once we get below the cloud layer, we should get some wonderful views of the Venusian surface with visible light photography, no one seems interested though, all the scientists who are on these projects are number crunchers, they don't seem to appreciate a good picture, they'd rather use radar mappers and then calculate what the surface looks like and make educated guesses on what the colors would be, and they are satisfied with that! Then there were those blind balloon probes the Russians sent. Whenever they send an atmospheric probe, they always make sure they are blind. I was looking forward to seeing pictures from those balloon probes the Russians but the Russians forgot to attach cameras to those probes. Tsk tsk tsk!

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#4 2016-04-28 18:49:29

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,690

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

Tom Kalbfus, what you said is true and since the Soviets were also a cash strapped and the US did not even try there has been no effort to change that status quo....

For nasa to make that change will require a flagship price tag on a discovery mission timeframe....What I saw for images suggested that the US was attempting a simular soviet designed vehicle to land on the surface...

That said we need to fight the enormous pressure, extreme temperature and then the acid bath on the way down.

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#5 2017-02-10 17:32:43

Void
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Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,528

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

I found this today, related to Venus, and other hot things.
https://phys.org/news/2017-02-nasa-elec … rface.html
Quote:

A team of scientists at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland recently completed a technology demonstration that could enable new scientific missions to the surface of Venus. The team demonstrated the first prolonged operation of electronics in the harsh conditions found on Venus.

"With further technology development, such electronics could drastically improve Venus lander designs and mission concepts, enabling the first long-duration missions to the surface of Venus," said Phil Neudeck, lead electronics engineer for this work.
Current Venus landers can only operate on the planet's surface for a few hours due to the extreme atmospheric conditions. The surface temperature on Venus is nearly 860 degrees Fahrenheit, which is hotter than most ovens, and the planet has a high-pressure carbon dioxide atmosphere. Because commercial electronics don't work in this environment, the electronics on past Venus landers have been protected by thermal and pressure-resistant vessels. These vessels only last a few hours, and they add substantial mass and expense to a mission.
To overcome these challenges, the Glenn team developed and implemented extremely durable silicon carbide semiconductor integrated circuits. They then electrically tested two of these integrated circuits in the Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER), which can precisely simulate the conditions expected on Venus' surface. The circuits withstood the Venus surface temperature and atmospheric conditions for 521 hours – operating more than 100 times longer than previously demonstrated Venus mission electronics.

Credit: NASA
"We demonstrated vastly longer electrical operation with chips directly exposed—no cooling and no protective chip packaging—to a high-fidelity physical and chemical reproduction of Venus' surface atmosphere," Neudeck said. "And both integrated circuits still worked after the end of the test."
Earlier this year, the team demonstrated nearly identical silicon carbide integrated circuits for more than 1,000 hours at 900 degrees Fahrenheit in Earth-atmosphere oven testing. The integrated circuits were originally designed to operate in hot regions of fuel-efficient aircraft engines.

"This work not only enables the potential for new science in extended Venus surface and other planetary exploration, but it also has potentially significant impact for a range of Earth relevant applications, such as in aircraft engines to enable new capabilities, improve operations, and reduce emissions," said Gary Hunter, principle investigator for Venus surface electronics development.

Of course the above is significant for probes to Venus.  To the surface, and perhaps to look for life in the clouds.

It also suggests to me that machines could ultimately be created to Mine the surface of Venus, and to then float the products to higher atmospheric elevations (Cloud Habitat).  Technically those would still be unmanned probes most likely so I am more or less true to this sections purpose, and I did not start a new topic.

Last edited by Void (2017-02-10 17:41:20)


I like people who criticize angels dancing on a pinhead.  I also like it when angels dance on my pinhead.

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#6 2017-02-10 17:42:02

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,528

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

Here is another article that includes a probe that can sail on Venus.
https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02 … uter-chip/
Quote:

The mechanical side of engineering a Venus lander would still be difficult today, but thanks to advances in materials science, oil drilling, and other high-temperature industrial pursuits, it should be within our capabilities. A rover, with more moving parts, would be a lot harder—though apparently NASA Glenn is working on a land-sailing rover that could be ready for 2023.

I think the idea behind the sail, is a rover on Venus will have to be very low power, so they will try to use sailing.

Isn't that something?

Last edited by Void (2017-02-10 17:43:45)


I like people who criticize angels dancing on a pinhead.  I also like it when angels dance on my pinhead.

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#7 2017-08-20 08:01:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,690

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

Shaun Barrett wrote:

NASA is now getting a mission started which will investigate the mysterious UV-absorbing material high in the Venusian atmosphere.
[See THIS SITE. ]

A team of scientists and engineers working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, has received funding from the agency's Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies, or PSDS3, program to advance a CubeSat mission concept revealing the nature of this mysterious absorber situated within the planet's uppermost cloud layer.

Called the CubeSat UV Experiment, or CUVE, the mission would investigate Venus' atmosphere using ultraviolet-sensitive instruments and a novel, carbon-nanotube light-gathering mirror.

Well about time too!! <_<
As we all know, exobiologist and expert on Venus, Dr. David Grinspoon, first suggested the possibility of microbial life in the upper clouds of Venus in 1997, 20 years ago!

Now, for some reason best known to the writer, you won't find any reference to a possible biological explanation in the NASA Cubsat report I've linked above, despite biology being one of the most compelling hypotheses.:huh:

So, if you're interested in the kind of logic bandied about among researchers investigating this intriguing U.V. absorption anomaly - including the life question - you'll have to read through this article from Astrobiology Magazine, published in 2002.
It's of moderate length, a little technical in places, but it gives you a good insight into the way their minds work. smile

Hmmmm.
You don't suppose the powers-that-be at NASA are busily trying to suppress any suggestion of exobiology on Venus as well as Mars, do you? :ph43r:
Naaaaaah!
Must be just more of my paranoia.

ya it is about time to try and explore

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#8 2017-09-03 19:04:09

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,690

Re: Venus Exploration, What are the future missions?

NASA’s Plan to Explore Venus with a “SteamPunk” Rover

Venus is one hellish place! Aside from surface temperatures hot enough to melt lead – as high as 737 K (462 °C; 864 °F) – there’s also the sulfuric acid droplets and extreme pressure conditions (92 times that of Earth’s) to contend with!
Hence why NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is looking at some truly innovative and unconventional ideas for future missions to Venus. One of them is the second-generation concept known as the Automaton Rover for Extreme Environments (AREE). By relying on clockwork mechanisms instead of electronics, this rover will be able to function on the surface of Venus for longer periods of time.

If deployed, this rover will build upon the accomplishments of the Soviet-era Venera and Vega programs, which were the only missions to ever successfully land on Venus’ hostile surface. Unfortunately, those probes that actually made it to the surface and landed safely only survived for 23 to 127 minutes before their electronics failed and they could no longer send back information.

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