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#426 2017-05-19 16:56:26

kbd512
Member
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 1,056

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

SpaceNut,

I agree.  Continue the life support and avionics systems development from Orion, but kill the capsule program.

Here's what we have or will have in the immediate future for crewed flights:
Dragon 2
Dream Chaser
Starliner

Here's what we have for robotic flights:
Cygnus (could also be used as a crewed deep space module and lander with appropriate propulsion)
Cygnus Enhanced (could also be used as crewed deep space module, but it's a tad too tall and heavy for landing)
Dragon
X-37B

Current Rockets:
Atlas V
Falcon 9
Pegasus XL

Near Future:
New Glenn
Stratolaunch
SLS
Vulcan
Vulcan Heavy

There are a slew of capabilities between all of those systems.  That's enough, already.  There's no need for a massive capsule like Orion.  Something has to go to get the development funding for the life support, kick stage, and lander technologies.

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#427 2017-05-19 20:23:39

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 764

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

kbd512 wrote:

SpaceNut,

I agree.  Continue the life support and avionics systems development from Orion, but kill the capsule program.

There's no need for a massive capsule like Orion.  Something has to go to get the development funding for the life support, kick stage, and lander technologies.

I agree completely, but NASA has "other plans," since none of the other systems were "invented here." (At NASA).

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#428 2017-07-06 18:38:33

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,012

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Orion deep in processing for EM-1, planning for following missions

Gee plastic wrapped for clean room visit....

Z2AGSd-350x139.jpg

From article the mass of Orion is still falling from the test EFT-1 to EM-1 and so are the number of welds needed to put it together with...The original Orion was at 31 welded parts and 3900 pounds, with the trial unit Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), had eighteen welded parts at about 3300 pounds with the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), we’re down to seven welded parts and 2700 pounds.

What I find interesting is still the creep on design an not fixed production at this point...

“We’re going to have to go after other components that are not yet fully designed, like the items that are coming on EM-2, like the life support components and such.  Same with the heatshield, we’re trying to lock that heatshield in and not redesign it.” Most of the Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) and crew systems will be developed to integrate with the rest of the spacecraft systems for the first time. “Things like air monitors and fire extinguishers and food, water dispensers, those kind of things.  The displays and controls will be new on EM-2 and then of course the life support system that is associated with the air circulating system, the carbon dioxide removal system, and the water system that’s cooling the crew will all be new on EM-2.”

EFT-1, Orion will fly with a fully functional European Service Module (ESM). The first ESM, Flight Model-1, is being integrated at an Airbus Defence and Space facility in Bremen, Germany.  Airbus is the prime contractor for the ESM.

For the EM-2 mission, current plans are to fly a more conservative circumlunar profile, with an extended checkout period in high Earth orbit first.  If everything checks out satisfactorily, Orion would then make a single flyby of the Moon with the first element of a Deep Space Gateway (DSG), a Power and Propulsion Element (PPE), on a translunar trajectory.

“The plan right now is to work towards the docking capability for EM-3,” Kearney said.  “We’re at the very beginning of that process,…but our budgetary plans right now are laid out to support docking on EM-3.”

On EM-3 the SLS launcher would perform a TLI burn with both Orion and a habitation module for the DSG.  On their way to the Moon, the Orion would then separate from the SLS upper stage, turn around, and dock to the Hab module.

After the mated Orion and Hab module separated from the booster, they would continue into the lunar halo orbit, where they would rendezvous and dock with the PPE.

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#429 2017-07-06 19:41:18

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 764

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Unlike Elon Musk, they don't have to worry about the cost overruns; it's "not their money."

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