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#426 2017-05-19 16:56:26

kbd512
Moderator
Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 2,995

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

SpaceNut,

I agree.  Continue the life support and avionics systems development from Orion, but kill the capsule program.

Here's what we have or will have in the immediate future for crewed flights:
Dragon 2
Dream Chaser
Starliner

Here's what we have for robotic flights:
Cygnus (could also be used as a crewed deep space module and lander with appropriate propulsion)
Cygnus Enhanced (could also be used as crewed deep space module, but it's a tad too tall and heavy for landing)
Dragon
X-37B

Current Rockets:
Atlas V
Falcon 9
Pegasus XL

Near Future:
New Glenn
Stratolaunch
SLS
Vulcan
Vulcan Heavy

There are a slew of capabilities between all of those systems.  That's enough, already.  There's no need for a massive capsule like Orion.  Something has to go to get the development funding for the life support, kick stage, and lander technologies.

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#427 2017-05-19 20:23:39

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 1,764

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

kbd512 wrote:

SpaceNut,

I agree.  Continue the life support and avionics systems development from Orion, but kill the capsule program.

There's no need for a massive capsule like Orion.  Something has to go to get the development funding for the life support, kick stage, and lander technologies.

I agree completely, but NASA has "other plans," since none of the other systems were "invented here." (At NASA).

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#428 2017-07-06 18:38:33

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Orion deep in processing for EM-1, planning for following missions

Gee plastic wrapped for clean room visit....

Z2AGSd-350x139.jpg

From article the mass of Orion is still falling from the test EFT-1 to EM-1 and so are the number of welds needed to put it together with...The original Orion was at 31 welded parts and 3900 pounds, with the trial unit Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), had eighteen welded parts at about 3300 pounds with the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), we’re down to seven welded parts and 2700 pounds.

What I find interesting is still the creep on design an not fixed production at this point...

“We’re going to have to go after other components that are not yet fully designed, like the items that are coming on EM-2, like the life support components and such.  Same with the heatshield, we’re trying to lock that heatshield in and not redesign it.” Most of the Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) and crew systems will be developed to integrate with the rest of the spacecraft systems for the first time. “Things like air monitors and fire extinguishers and food, water dispensers, those kind of things.  The displays and controls will be new on EM-2 and then of course the life support system that is associated with the air circulating system, the carbon dioxide removal system, and the water system that’s cooling the crew will all be new on EM-2.”

EFT-1, Orion will fly with a fully functional European Service Module (ESM). The first ESM, Flight Model-1, is being integrated at an Airbus Defence and Space facility in Bremen, Germany.  Airbus is the prime contractor for the ESM.

For the EM-2 mission, current plans are to fly a more conservative circumlunar profile, with an extended checkout period in high Earth orbit first.  If everything checks out satisfactorily, Orion would then make a single flyby of the Moon with the first element of a Deep Space Gateway (DSG), a Power and Propulsion Element (PPE), on a translunar trajectory.

“The plan right now is to work towards the docking capability for EM-3,” Kearney said.  “We’re at the very beginning of that process,…but our budgetary plans right now are laid out to support docking on EM-3.”

On EM-3 the SLS launcher would perform a TLI burn with both Orion and a habitation module for the DSG.  On their way to the Moon, the Orion would then separate from the SLS upper stage, turn around, and dock to the Hab module.

After the mated Orion and Hab module separated from the booster, they would continue into the lunar halo orbit, where they would rendezvous and dock with the PPE.

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#429 2017-07-06 19:41:18

Oldfart1939
Member
Registered: 2016-11-26
Posts: 1,764

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Unlike Elon Musk, they don't have to worry about the cost overruns; it's "not their money."

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#430 2018-12-28 12:25:59

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) - ESA ISS cargo carrier this has eveloved into the service module for Orion

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#431 2019-01-27 18:16:37

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

We are getting closer every day to the EM1 test flight and its going to have Radiation for dummies on board to get real measurements for the capsules design.

astrorad-radiation-vest-stemrad-hg.jpg

Meet Helga and Zohar, the dummies destined for a pioneering lunar flyby to help protect space travelers from cosmic rays and energetic solar storms.

These two female phantoms will occupy the passenger seats during Orion's first mission around the Moon, going further than any human has flown before.

Fitted with more than 5600 sensors, the pair will measure the amount of radiation astronauts could be exposed to in future missions with unprecedented precision.

The two phantoms simulate adult female torsos. Both Helga and Zohar are made up of 38 slices of tissue-equivalent plastics that mimic the varying density of bones, soft tissue and lungs. Similar dummies are used in hospitals to quantify the right dose of radiation for cancer therapies.

"We chose female phantoms because the number of women astronauts is increasing, and also because the female body is typically more vulnerable to radiation,"

The only difference between the twin dummies is that Zohar will be wearing a radiation protection vest, while Helga will travel unprotected from spaceborne radiation.

This vest is called AstroRad, and has been developed by a start-up company sponsored by the Israel Space Agency. "We are relying on our expertise in protecting personnel in nuclear plants and emergency workers exposed to high levels of radiation or terrorist biological threats,"

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human … tion/Orion

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#432 2019-03-24 19:12:56

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

For those that want to know what piece of pork your state is responsible for
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/system … -resources

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#433 2019-03-24 19:29:16

kbd512
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Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 2,995

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

SpaceNut,

None of us asked for Orion or SLS.

This is entirely a machination of Congress that has bi-partisan support for reasons that only Congress knows.

We were sold a bill of goods that later turned out to be a misrepresentation of what we were getting.

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#434 2019-03-24 20:50:39

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

True but had this not been done we would be flying soyuz and no space x as we had stopped flying in 2004 all but for finishing the iss with the final shuttle flights. Could we have done better for sure by actually requiring a time line and product at cost that we wanted.
This is something space x and a few others are trying to do with lesser engineering talent and funds.

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#435 2019-05-16 17:01:51

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

The only way we are going back to the moon with the SLS and Orion seems to be if we keep pumping tons of money into it...

Trump, NASA want another $1.6 billion to return America to the moon

If approved, the amendment would bring the space agency's total budget for fiscal year 2020 up to $22.6 billion.

According to the budget amendment request, $1 billion of the extra funds would go toward the development of commercial human lunar landing systems.

Another $651 million would be directed toward the development of the Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft.

Trump and the White House have called on NASA to return astronauts to the moon by 2024.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has repeatedly vocalized his agency's intention to meet the president's challenge.

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#436 2019-06-30 22:41:05

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

NASA to test Orion spacecraft designed to carry humans back to the moon from Cape Canaveral

Test of escape system using a Minotaur IV, provided by Northrop Grumman at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 46.

Instead, during the three-minute test, the spacecraft will blast off to an altitude of about six miles while traveling at a speed of over 1,000 mph. From there, the system's abort motor will fire and pull the spacecraft away from the booster within milliseconds, as it would in an emergency situation during a regular crewed flight.

Here's a breakdown of the test launch:

    A test version of the crew module will launch atop the Minotaur IV rocket from Launch Complex 46.
    Fifty-five seconds after launch, the abort sequence will initiate at an altitude of 31,000 feet.
    At this point, the abort motor will fire with 400,000 pounds of thrust, pulling the crew module away from the booster.
    From there, the altitude control motor will reorient the launch abort system to be able to safely separate from the crew module.
    Once the jettison motor fires, the system will separate from the crew module.
    Lastly, the onboard data recorders for the launch will separate from the capsule, ending the test.
    The crew module will splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean.

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#437 2019-08-09 19:50:33

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Inching ever so slowly down the path towards a human launch..
successful, continuous 12-minute firing of Orion's propulsion system in a simulated what is referred to as an abort-to-orbit scenario...

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#438 2019-09-23 21:47:38

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

We do not get as much as we use to... NASA in megadeal with Lockheed for moon mission

orion-crew-module-exploration-mission-1-hg.jpg

NASA on Monday earmarked almost $3 billion to Lockheed Martin to build three Orion capsules, to allow US astronauts to return to the moon by 2024.

The megadeal calls for a first phase including three capsules for $2.7 billion, for Artemis missions III to V -- to take astronauts back to the moon.

Each capsule can carry four astronauts.

The space agency plans to order three more capsules during fiscal year 2022 for missions VI to VIII, for a total of $1.9 billion, said a NASA statement.

http://nasawatch.com/archives/2019/09/n … on-an.html

"NASA and Lockheed Martin have finalized a contract for the production and operations of six Orion spacecraft missions and the ability to order up to 12 in total.

Keith's note: Does NASA even have a confirmed budget to build the 6 SLS rockets to actually launch these 6 Orions to Gateway?

There seems to be a mismatch in launcher versus capsules....so whats riding on the other 6?

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#439 2019-09-28 21:10:05

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Hold onto your wallet.. NASA commits to ordering more Orion spacecraft from Lockheed Martin for moon missions but I do not know how you can say Lockheed wins contract for moon capsule when they are the manufacturer of the capsule to begin with...for 12 more capsules


The capsule is the lynchpin of NASA's Artemis program, which could return astronauts to the moon's surface as early as 2024, ahead of crewed missions to Mars.

NASA has ordered three Orion spacecraft for upcoming Artemis missions for $2.7 billion, according to a news release. The agency plans to order another three in 2022 for $1.9 billion, and has the ability to order six more for future missions.

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#440 2019-10-13 19:30:13

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 16,557

Re: Orion (CEV / SM) - status

Here we go again rewarding the heal dragging money gourging contractors which can not seem to even deliver a launchable rocket.
Lockheed Martin Lands a $4.6 Billion NASA Contract for the Orion Spacecraft

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