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#1 2007-04-09 07:42:51

X
Member
From: Alabama
Registered: 2007-02-02
Posts: 134

Re: Where does this stand now?

There's a post from a few years ago that the Mars Society and Mars Society UK were trying to design a similar project.  Has that gotten anymore?

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#2 2007-04-09 11:44:15

C M Edwards
Member
From: Lake Charles LA USA
Registered: 2002-04-29
Posts: 1,011

Re: Where does this stand now?

As far as I know, the actual launch is in limbo.  For a time, it looked as though Elon Musk was interested in providing funding.  However, nothing materialized from that and Musk appears to have rededicated the resources to SpaceX for the time being.

Clinostat studies were also performed on the ground, but I'm not aware that the results have been published.


"We go big, or we don't go."  - GCNRevenger

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#3 2007-11-19 15:42:36

JoshNH4H
Mod and Martian
From: New York, NY, USA, Earth, Sol
Registered: 2007-07-15
Posts: 2,038
Website

Re: Where does this stand now?

What is the translife project exactly?


-Josh

New on the Gamma Factor blog: Self-Replicating Machines are the Next Big Thing
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#4 2008-01-14 00:56:38

X
Member
From: Alabama
Registered: 2007-02-02
Posts: 134

Re: Where does this stand now?

From what I've read here Mars' gravity would be simulated on the ISS.  Mice and hopefully other mammals in the future would be placed there to see if they could successfully reproduce over several generations.

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#5 2008-01-15 15:22:24

JoshNH4H
Mod and Martian
From: New York, NY, USA, Earth, Sol
Registered: 2007-07-15
Posts: 2,038
Website

Re: Where does this stand now?

Oh, OK.  Thanks.  But the ISS?  Could that really work there?


-Josh

New on the Gamma Factor blog: Self-Replicating Machines are the Next Big Thing
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#6 2008-03-17 06:15:30

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Where does this stand now?

Wow went searching for the project only to find 2 threads that it happened to be mentioned in but the kicker was this project was originally started by Mars Society under the Translife Project.
The artificial gravity project planned to simulate the effects of Martian gravity on animals.

This project is still alive but it no longer goes under the translife moniker or at least the resurected portion as commited to be MIT as Bio Satellite.


Hi everyone, just updating this section, if you check out our front page you will see we have taken our first step in supporting this important project, it's official! http://marsdrive.com/about-marsdrive/ma … llite.html

MarsDrive is pleased to announced that we have secured a place on the MarsGravity BioSatellite spacecraft for our logo to be launched in 2010. We would like to thank our supporters whose contributions have made this possible and will be setting a fund raising goal of $8000 for further support for this most important project in the next 12 months. If you would like to help us take this next big step you can donate by pressing the paypal button here. You can also find our logo at the "Your Name Into Space" website here. http://www.yournameintospace.org/current_sponsors.php

http://www.marsgravity.org/main/
The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Project is a ground-breaking undertaking to study the effects of Martian gravity on mammals. We are taking the first step towards human missions to Mars - and beyond. Data from this mission will make a significant contribution to our understanding of fundamental space biology and greatly advance human space exploration.

We still want to raise the larger amount of $8000 but this is a start. We think it's entirely appropriate for a Mars based group to have a big part in this experiment, and while individuals can give to that project directly we believe it's a great opportunity to bring the public focus back onto why this mission is being done at all- the colonization of Mars.

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#7 2008-03-17 08:25:44

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Where does this stand now?

Just did a search on Mars Gravity Biosat to see where this came in and it was number 6 on the list but all that aside  I posted to cover page story and this threads info on Newmars and on Red Colony as well.

gravitybiosat.jpg

http://www.marsgravity.org/main/

Something of interest if you have the skill is; 

The Mars Gravity Team is currently seeking interested students of all levels of experience to become involved with the project. Opportunities exist in engineering, science, management, business development, and educational outreach.

Here are some more details on the mission and the satelite as well.
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/mars … llite.html

The project is expected to cost about $15 million plus the cost of the launch. The teams have received more than $400,000 for building the spacecraft from a variety of sources including NASA, the three universities, and a number of private companies and individuals. The teams have also secured commitments to cover approximately half the cost of the $6 million launch.


Inside view

mars-biosatellite2.jpg


As Frank indicated Your tax-deductible transaction will support America's most ambitious student spacecraft, an initiative of MIT and Georgia Tech.

MarsDrive is in the Bronze status
http://www.yournameintospace.org/current_sponsors.php

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#8 2012-03-18 00:26:11

Zogwart
Member
Registered: 2012-03-18
Posts: 1

Re: Where does this stand now?

I was wondering if any one had an update to any of the information given here.

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#9 2013-06-06 10:22:06

idiom
Member
From: New Zealand
Registered: 2004-04-21
Posts: 312

Re: Where does this stand now?

This seems stuck, even though it is one of the biggest question marks hanging over space colonization.

Perhaps it could be a good crowd funding target?


Come on to the Future

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#10 2013-06-07 07:33:48

JoshNH4H
Mod and Martian
From: New York, NY, USA, Earth, Sol
Registered: 2007-07-15
Posts: 2,038
Website

Re: Where does this stand now?

I wonder how low you could get the costs.  Say a small chemical thruster to spin and de-spin, a couple mice or rats or whatever, three to six months of food, water, and oxygen.  I bet it could weigh under 100 kg and be developed for a minimal cost.

That said, to crowd fund the interest would have to be there.


-Josh

New on the Gamma Factor blog: Self-Replicating Machines are the Next Big Thing
Mod actions in red

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#11 2015-10-12 08:49:47

martienne
Member
From: EU
Registered: 2014-03-29
Posts: 134

Re: Where does this stand now?

What would it actually take, in terms of energy, to get some form of gravity artificially simulated on the ISS?

Has the space station got the amount of energy available?  I mean, it requires running a massive centrifuge at an incredibly high speed....

So sad though, with all these great and exciting Mars related ideas that never seem to get off the ground...

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#12 2017-05-17 08:27:43

Tacitus Low
Member
Registered: 2017-05-15
Posts: 4

Re: Where does this stand now?

It's really unfortunate that NASA scrapped this project. It's worse yet that Elon Musk decided he wasn't interested. As far as I know, the MGB is the only project of its kind that's ever even been proposed. While it's great that Scott Kelly spent a year aboard the ISS, and that certainly helps answer some gravity-related questions, we still don't really know what the long term effects of Mars gravity would be on the human body.

Granted, in my view the fact that the MGB never materialized shouldn't stop us from colonizing Mars. This is pure conjecture, but my guess is that the human body will probably adopt just fine to Mars gravity. Considering that nobody has ever suffered permanent damage from longterm zero G exposure, that suggests to me that with countermeasures in place (nutritional suppliments, vigorous exercise routines, etc.) any future colonists on Mars can almost certainly counteract any negative effects on their bodies. Besides, I think most colonists would be willing to take the risk. I know I would.

However, my conjecturing does very little to assuage the misgivings of the fear-mongerers. Until we have reliable, scientific data that proves that the human body can survive Mars gravity longterm, our critics will always have the one up on us. Plus, I think it's just good policy to attempt to put this issue to rest with the MGB. I think the Mars Society should keep pushing for this.

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#13 2017-09-19 16:29:10

jburk
Webmaster
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: 2011-11-17
Posts: 114
Website

Re: Where does this stand now?

This is a really old project; and nothing is happening for sure at Mars Society regarding this.  Recommend we archive this forum.  If nobody objects I will do that in the next month or so.


James Burk | Webmaster & IT Director | The Mars Society
jburk@marssociety.org  |  +1 (206) 601-7143

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#14 2017-09-19 16:58:09

elderflower
Member
Registered: 2016-06-19
Posts: 435

Re: Where does this stand now?

But the ability of Mars explorers to withstand earth return Gee will determine whether they can come back at all. The only reason that I can think of that NASA/ESA/Russia hasn't done a gee simulation satellite for long term studies is that they have no intention of ever sending people to Mars.

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#15 2017-09-19 17:02:54

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 10,262

Re: Where does this stand now?

Last I knew MarsDrive held all the research rights and information to which they did have plans to get it launched back around the time when there website failed as well. They are in the process of regrowing thereorganization as a result of some missed steps but are still active.

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