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#1 2016-10-16 23:04:54

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,348

hidden-glaciers-mars

Just trying to do something informational, will not speculate if I can possibly avoid it.

http://www.universetoday.com/131423/hid … ers-mars/#
Topography_of_Colles_Nili-700x432.jpg
quote:

In the northern hemisphere of Mars, between the planet’s southern highlands and the northern lowlands, is a hilly region known as Colles Nilli. This boundary-marker is a very prominent feature on Mars, as it is several kilometers in height and surrounded by the remains of ancient glaciers.

I would have liked a global map also which pointed out it's location.  Is it near the equator?
Another quote from the article:

Combined with this latest info taken from the northern hemisphere, it would appear that there is plenty of ice deposits all across the surface of Mars. The presence (and prevalence) of these icy remnants offer insight into Mars’ geological past, which – like Earth – involved some “ice ages”.

I don't care to speculate on what they intend when they say "plenty of ice deposits all across the surface of Mars". 

Maybe someone else has greater information.

Last edited by Void (2016-10-16 23:11:10)


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#2 2016-10-17 11:11:07

Mark Friedenbach
Member
From: Mountain View, CA
Registered: 2003-01-31
Posts: 325

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

If you want to talk of glaciers:

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2008/pdf/2441.pdf

Evidence for a 0.28km thick glacier just east of Helles basin.

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#3 2016-10-17 11:58:55

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,348

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

That's also a good possibility, if the Hellas basin itself proves to be a good place to operate.  12.4 mb pressure in bottom.

http://m.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2 … in_context
Colles_Nili_in_context_article_mob.jpg
https://www.google.com/mars/

Alright, I have no reason to conclude that Colles Nili is at a lower latitude than Hellas.  I have been looking, but I have better things to do for now.

Last edited by Void (2016-10-17 12:10:39)


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#4 2018-01-30 17:31:45

phyllistorres
Member
Registered: 2018-01-30
Posts: 1

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

This is pretty interesting topic for research. Do you have enough time for it now?


Hi to everybody here!

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#5 2018-01-30 18:08:10

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 18,863

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

Welcome to NewMars phyllistorres, most of the members here do there own contributions to a topic as we are airchair scientists, rocket engineers and more when it comes to how do we get to mars safely and be able to return with a cargo of mars samples. To which it is hoped that we will begin to spread man kinds wings throughout the universe....

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#6 2018-01-30 20:42:05

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,348

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

phyllistorres Hi

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/ … fe-seekers

So, maybe there are choices.  Water near the equator with a lesser pressure, can I hope for 9 mb in some cases, and water in Hellas.  I think that possibly the settlement capabilities might become so much stronger, from what I currently see, that both should be tried.

But I am a different sort of animal.  I am not really Scientific, but have some notions of the technological due to my employment histories.  Even then I reserve the right to have an interest in the subject matters here.  I try not to overstep my limits.  But I am sure that on occasion I have made myself an annoyance without understanding the trespass.

Last edited by Void (2018-01-30 20:48:19)


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#7 2018-01-31 12:37:38

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,348

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

The near equator ice is interesting:
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/ … fe-seekers
Map1.jpg?itok=jpLTwdM1
Quote:

Several regions on Mars are potentially water-rich (dark blue), including broad areas near the equator. 
J.T. Wilson et al., Icarus (2017)
“This is a really wonderful example of how data, once collected, can be analyzed with new techniques,” says Jim Head, a planetary geologist at Brown University. “When we eventually send people to Mars, we’ll want to go where the water is.”

https://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/i2782/
i2782_sh1.jpg


So, now I think there are three possibilities of how that water could get there.
1) Glaciation from the past.
2) A special condensation process, involving salts and the extreme day night temperature changes.
3) Briny Aquifers.  It is now thought that Don Juan pond is fed by a salty aquifer.
https://www.astrobio.net/mars/salty-ant … ars-water/
https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/news/salt … ars-water/
donjuanpond_ali_2014003-2.jpg__1240x510_q85_subject_location-360%2C213_subsampling-2.jpg

1) Surely some ice deposits discovered, at least at high and mid latitudes must be glacial.  But for the equator, it is said they don't know how the ice can survive at the equator for more than 125,000 years.

2) & 3) I was thinking that a condensation process involving salt would deposit ice, but maybe if there are salty aquifers, and a continuous replenishment by such a condensation process, at least some of the moisture is soggy ground with a thin dryer dirt cover.

I am not sure that that can happen, but the articles imply that it might.

For a Mars settlement, a easily accessed briny liquid would be much more usable that ice deposits that need mining.

If you could just suction up liquid (Briny and cold) water, then much less heavy equipment would be required.

Last edited by Void (2018-01-31 13:01:40)


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#8 2018-02-02 13:56:28

Void
Member
Registered: 2011-12-29
Posts: 3,348

Re: hidden-glaciers-mars

I suppose I am a bit off topic, but this thread is dead without it anyway:
https://www.seeker.com/planets/portable … conditions

Notice the phrase "Mineral Crusts" in this next reference:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a … 3512003508

https://www.deepdyve.com/lp/elsevier/mi … SSBKwgwydE

Images:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=co … &FORM=IGRE

Yes, I suppose to some extent you are still locked into the 70's or before.

We have two probable examples of very cold spring water (Salty).  Don Juan pond at the South Pole:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Juan_Pond

And Axle Heiberg Island as mentioned previously, at the near north pole.

Both have salty/briny spring water it now seems most likely.

Don Juan pond is probably too hostile for life, but the springs at Axle Heiberg Island do support life.

My own feeling is that Mars has little or no biosphere.

My reason is that in reading an article I was instructed that in searching for life on other planets, one marker which would matter would be the absence of Carbon Monoxide.  If it was present, it would indicate that nothing was eating it.

Mars has a small but significant amount of Carbon Monoxide and double that of Oxygen.  (Approximately).

I am not that interested in the matter, but it is something to eyeball.

What I am really interested in is the apparent water/ice in specific locations near the equator.

I think that the equator of Mars will be more hostile than Don Juan pond.  Not likely to host life.  But if there could be life hostile briny springs, with mineral crusts over them and then wind blown dust over that, it is a matter of interest.

1) Well, you want a fluid water to suck up if you can.
2) Don't walk on those mineral crusts and break through!

But, if it is glacial ice, then fine.

It is good that there is water near the equator in any case.

Last edited by Void (2018-02-02 14:11:08)


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