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#1 2015-03-29 10:20:19

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 21,299

2015 GAO Report: NASA - Assessments of Selected Large-Scale Projects

We traditionally talked about the budgets before the crash and of the reports that indicated that either Nasa did not have enough money, had gone the wrong directions with some of its projects, how some projects had cost overruns that we considered to high for the payback ect...

GAO Report: Nasa

http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/669205.pdf

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So we know that the pork projects are eating up Nasa's budgets but what was the amount for the given years?

Cumulative cost growth was 2.4 percent and average schedule growth was 3 months. The growth within the past year is attributable to only a few projects. However, five projects, including the Space Launch System (SLS)the largest program in NASA's portfolioonly recently established cost and schedule baselines, and as expected, has not yet experienced any cost growth in 2015, which masks growth of several smaller projects in the portfolio.

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#2 2015-03-30 21:50:30

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 21,299

Re: 2015 GAO Report: NASA - Assessments of Selected Large-Scale Projects

Only 589 days to go! Will Space Play in the 2016 US Election

It’s a race that some believe will cost the nation upwards of five billion dollars; that’s about 7.5 Mars missions for those of you out there counting. Peer a little closer, though, and many potential candidates have strong ties to the space exploration industry. Headlining this group is the only high-profile contender to have officially declared himself: Senator Ted Cruz (R, TX). Sen. Cruz is the new chairman of the Space, Science, and Competitiveness subcommittee, the Senate body which oversees NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Joining him on the subcommittee is another likely presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio (R, FL). Florida, of course, is home to Kennedy Space Center, the launch complex for most US space activities. The economic impact of the so-called “Space Coast” puts space exploration at the forefront of Florida politicians’ minds and the state was also formerly lead by yet another likely Republican presidential candidate, Gov. Jeb Bush

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Scientific research is a low priority for most Americans

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Disagreement between Democrats and Republicans is highest among scientific issues.

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#3 2015-03-31 05:29:08

Tom Kalbfus
Banned
Registered: 2006-08-16
Posts: 4,401

Re: 2015 GAO Report: NASA - Assessments of Selected Large-Scale Projects

Except I don't see NASA's budget listed on any of those priorities. Unless your referring to the line about supporting scientific research. Developing the SLS itself is not in itself scientific research, but it does open the door to scientific research in the future using that asset.

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#4 2015-10-30 19:38:14

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 21,299

Re: 2015 GAO Report: NASA - Assessments of Selected Large-Scale Projects

I started to search for what is the Budget for Nasa as we did at one time have them as direct topics as it would effect the outcome of the large and small projects alike as the dollars needed to compete one project would bloom while another would whither into cancellation....

After using Firefox to open the web page for links for Nasa budget dollars, it includes data for Previous Years' Budgets back to 2003

http://www.nasa.gov/news/budget/index.html

Using this on could show that the planned dollars for mars mission in the future are going really ramp up with flight rate if we use the fact that we have bearly gotten out of the developement stage since 2004. At approximate 3 billion a year wasted to get to this point that is a total of 33 billion and what do we have to show for it....even if we say the real money for the projects start in 2010 that is still at least 15 billion....

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