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#126 2021-09-04 05:43:18

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 7,086

Re: California Wildfires

Can I point out a grammatical error in your post? Where you suggest "We are forward thinking, open, and progressive." I think you'll find that should be "We were forward thinking, open, and progressive."

clark wrote:

HAHAHA as a Californian I find the comments here humorous. We are the most populous state. We have an economy that dwarfs the rest of the individual states. We are forward thinking, open, and progressive. We export culture, technology, agriculture, and a promise of a better future. We don’t have everything right, but we have more going for us than not. Stick with TX and wear a burka. Live in FL and die from poor education in science.

Wildfires are largely due to federal failures. We can’t manage what we don’t own. If anyone wants to outline where state land is burning down I’m happy to concede.

Given the current climate issues and the persistent nature and cadence, technology is going to quickly catch up with some solutions simply because there is a dollar to be made.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#127 2021-09-08 08:11:14

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 994

Re: California Wildfires

California could be on track for one of its worst fire seasons ever
https://ktla.com/news/california/califo … sons-ever/

Monrovia Gets $41K For Bobcat Fire Repairs
https://patch.com/california/monrovia/m … re-repairs

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#128 2021-09-17 21:13:40

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,826

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#129 2021-09-25 10:03:18

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,982

Re: California Wildfires

https://www.yahoo.com/news/thirsty-atmo … 30448.html

The drought in California isn't just the result of a scarcity of precipitation. It is a combination of two things: a lack of rain and those thirsty atmospheric conditions that desiccate the landscape. For much of California, the 2021 summer and water year have had the highest evaporative demand in the last 40 years, according to the National Integrated Drought Information System.

Increased evaporative demand has exacerbated the dryness in vegetation that has enabled more wildfires this year. Active wildfires such as the Windy fire and the KNP Complex fires were among those that continued to consume parched vegetation in California.

A 'thirsty' atmosphere is propelling Northern California's drought into the record books
Paul Duginski
Sat, September 25, 2021 8:00 AM

(th)

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#130 2021-09-25 12:58:39

GW Johnson
Member
From: McGregor, Texas USA
Registered: 2011-12-04
Posts: 4,682
Website

Re: California Wildfires

Anybody ever blow out a match?  Or a small grease fire in a grill?  Ever wonder why that works?  Or how?  I know.

Long ago I had an idea how to blow out wildfires with a huge,  powerful explosion (or explosions).  You could only do that out in the wild lands,  where there is nothing to destroy but trees already on fire.  You would have to follow up immediately with a whole formation of planes dropping retardant,  so that the fire doesn't rekindle from all the still-incandescent sparks all over the ground.

You won't be able to have much effect with 500,  1000,  or 2000 lb bombs.  You need those oddball 20,000 and 30,000 lb things that are parachute-extracted from C-130's.  Or maybe even larger,  I dunno.  They must be low-altitude air bursts.

NOBODY has ever tested this idea,  to the best of my knowledge.  But it surely would be fun to try.  Might even work.  And we need a new weapon against wildfires,  that much is pathetically obvious.

GW

Last edited by GW Johnson (2021-09-25 12:59:55)


GW Johnson
McGregor,  Texas

"There is nothing as expensive as a dead crew,  especially one dead from a bad management decision"

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#131 2021-09-25 15:14:32

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,982

Re: California Wildfires

For GW Johnson re #130

On behalf of the forum readers who do ** not ** know how a blast of air blows out a candle, I'd invite your expanding on your post a bit.

I expect everyone who might read this forum has the experience you've described, but I'll bet that 99.999% of us haven't given this familiar observation any thought.

However, the idea of extending that concept to an entire forest fire is just the sort of thing this forum takes in stride.

***
Regarding the best weapon against forest fires ... it's always been and likely always ** will ** be an adequate supply of fresh water.

In the Nuclear is Safe topic I'm working on a proposal to duplicate the Palo Verde nuclear power plant in Arizona to provide all the fresh water presently consumed by the City of Phoenix, and have power left over. 

That idea (using nuclear power to deliver fresh water) is perfectly feasible.  It is the social context (fear of nuclear power) that prevents us from setting out forthrightly to replace all the random fluctuations of Nature with consistent supply of fresh water.

(th)

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#132 2021-09-25 15:20:18

RobertDyck
Moderator
From: Winnipeg, Canada
Registered: 2002-08-20
Posts: 6,892
Website

Re: California Wildfires

Using explosives to put out fire is the standard way to put out an oil well fire. It works, but easier with an oil well because the fuel source is very well localized. I don't know how well it would work with a forest.

I have posted before the idea of new building codes. Any new housing development built in forest must be built fireproof. And I've posted how to build a fireproof house. It doesn't require new technology, you can use materials currently available from stores that sell construction material. You just have to do it. Miami-Dade County has building codes for houses to be resistant to hurricanes, because that's what they have there. Other locations prone to floods have building codes to deal with flood. Where I live, houses have basements because foundation footings must be deep enough to prevent frozen ground in winter from getting under the footing. When I was a child, spring thaw often resulted in basement floods. Building codes were updated to require a sump pit with sump pump to remove melt water. In areas of forest prone to wild fires, updating building codes to survive fire seems obvious.

Ps. I'm not just wagging my finger. I live in Canada, not California. But the town of Fort McMurray, Alberta, had a bad forest fire. It burned down much of the town. I would argue building codes there should also require fireproof houses. Some homes did survive; specifically home owners who followed recommendations to clear trees to a certain distance from their homes. But entire neighbourhoods were razed. And my city of Winnipeg my not have forest fires, but does have problems of its own.

Last edited by RobertDyck (2021-09-25 15:29:02)

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#133 2021-10-01 22:05:24

tahanson43206
Moderator
Registered: 2018-04-27
Posts: 7,982

Re: California Wildfires

https://www.yahoo.com/news/protecting-h … 57305.html

California-based Firezat, which is currently the only company in the U.S. that sells this aluminum wrap to public and private entities at scale, has sold thousands of square feet of the material for the express purpose of structural protection against wildfires—including the piece lovingly wrapped around General Sherman. Firezat’s sales increased 30% each of the last two years as fires become increasingly prominent threats to large swathes of both public and private land, with higher temperature, higher wind speeds and longer fire seasons straining firefighting capabilities, says Firezat CEO and founder Daniel Hirning. Five years ago, about 95% of the company’s business was in sales to forest service and Bureau of Land Management customers to protect things like historic buildings; that has expanded to include private homeowners. Hirning says about “several thousand” homes would be able to deploy Firezat by now, based on cumulative sales. Now, other businesses in the space are beginning to see the potential, too. But the buy-in for aluminum wraps, which block 96% of radiant heat, is just in the nascent stages, suggests Hirning. “You think all this coverage and all this advertising exposure [would increase sales even more], but it kind of has the opposite effect,” he says. “There’s an apathy. I think people just get overwhelmed.”

This can definitely go into Business Opportunity, as well as Technology Updates and California Wildfires

(th)

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#134 2021-10-01 22:26:19

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,826

Re: California Wildfires

post 128 shows it in use

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#135 2021-10-09 12:43:20

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,826

Re: California Wildfires

Hundreds of giant sequoias may have been killed in California fires, park officials say

All because we are running power lines through the forests and allow those to camp open fires.

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#136 2021-11-25 18:27:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,826

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