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#176 2019-12-29 18:03:37

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: ISRU propellant production - energy requirement for the BFR?

Look again as its is higher as there are 2 compressor units in the diagram and its the rating given for 1 hr run time so mars days are 25 hrs long so thats going to come in around 300 kwhrs. The there is more energy needed to cool the co2 in 2 stages at another 25 kwhr sun fir the stages and more if you are going to break the co2 into co and o2. which of course needs more energy for liquification...

The atmosphere of Mars is the layer of gases surrounding Mars. The atmospheric pressure on the Martian surface averages 600 pascals (0.087 psi), about 0.6% of Earth's mean sea level pressure of 101.3 kilopascals (14.69 psi)...

I am wondering what temperature the chamber would need to be raised to for a mars direct pressure conversion, since we need a range of psi of 50 to 75 for the experiments being done on earth for the unit to work. We also know that the catalyst and temperature to purity of the conversion is also another area still being worked on.

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#177 2020-01-01 22:01:20

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: ISRU propellant production - energy requirement for the BFR?

updating topic

tahanson43206 wrote:

For SpaceNut re #721 and references to scroll pump ...

The link you provided to the NASA site came up with a powerpoint dated 2017, with a number of references to work by Dr. Zubrin and associates.

The technology of a "scroll pump" is new to me.  Someone might be interested in the page at Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scroll_compressor

In the NASA powerpoint, only two stages of compression are shown, moving from Mars atmosphere to input to the Sabatier reaction.

(th)

RobertDyck wrote:

NASA SBIR - 1998 (abstract only): Mars Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Freezer

NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) - 2012: Mars In Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization
(ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last
five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments,
(1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large
amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at
lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the
potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed
for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas
Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing
technology to extract water from Martian soil.

NASA NTRS - 2011: Evaluation of Mars CO2 Capture and Gas Separation Technologies

NASA NTRS - 2017 (slides): The Technology and Future of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU)

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#178 2020-01-05 10:48:54

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: ISRU propellant production - energy requirement for the BFR?

repost

louis wrote:

This is a good description of what is required:

https://www.thespacereview.com/article/3484/1

The Exytron approach at Augsburg might be relevant:

https://www.carboncommentary.com/blog/2 … -and-reuse

They do seem to have an installed pilot project:

https://exytron.online/en/news/

It would obviously need scaling up.

This Danish biogas planet has successfully experimented with a methanation plant...but again, looks like they need to scale that up.

https://www.lemvigbiogas.com/MeGa-stoREfinalreport.pdf

But this might be where Space X would go for manufacture or consultancy advice for their own manufacture.

Climateworks is doing this same thing

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