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#1 2004-07-21 06:48:59

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.saturntoday.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=9775]A fantastic article linking Pioneer 11 and Galileo

*It's dated November 2002 -- how could I have missed it?  yikes
Better late than never, huh?

Here's something new to me:  "Jupiter's dark rings--as wide as Saturn's yet nearly invisible--"

Jupiter's rings are as wide as Saturn's?  I knew Jupiter's rings were dim and much less massive than Saturn's but...wow.  Didn't know about the wideness.  :-\  Based on science illustrations and the few pics, I was under the impression Jupiter's rings were *thin*.

"Jupiter's rings consist of fine dust akin to the particles in cigarette smoke. The dust grains are dark (they reflect barely 5% of the sunlight that hits them) and they are spread so thin that the rings are almost transparent. This is what makes the rings so hard to study."  The rings are apparently formed from meteor impacts on Jupiter's moons -- which then kicks up dust.

also - "Dust grains ejected into Jupiter's rings don't stay in the rings forever. The grains spiral in toward Jupiter and eventually disappear."

Article describes why rings lose orbital energy.

Maybe most amazing of all:  "Jupiter's rings are constantly replenished by meteoroid impacts, so they won't disappear any time soon. Next year's rings, however, might be made of different 'stuff' than this year's. In that sense, Jupiter's rings might be younger than you are."

After reading this article I'm doubly hopeful NASA will approve the "Juno" mission (check out that thread in the "Unmanned Probes" folder if you like).

:up:

--Cindy  cool


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#2 2004-07-21 06:51:36

Yang Liwei Rocket
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Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

very good  smile


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#3 2004-07-22 08:23:14

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Hi YL Rocket.  Yep.  smile

This item as well is particularly fascinating:  " There is also an extremely tenuous and distant outer ring that circles Jupiter backwards.  No one is certain, but that ring might be made of captured interplanetary dust."

Backwards...  :laugh:

The endlessly wonderful universe.  smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#4 2004-08-28 12:04:51

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
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Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/jupiter/ … ]Fantastic

*Couldn't decide where else to put this photo (it's not a new discovery, etc.), so will place this here...besides, the thread was started with an excellent article which some folks might have missed the first time around.   big_smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#5 2004-09-02 11:25:52

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Have decided to make this also the thread regarding images of Jupiter from the now-deceased Galileo probe, telescopes, etc. 

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap991226.html]::sigh::

Very soothing to look at.  Endless beauty in our universe.

--Cindy  smile


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#6 2004-09-02 12:12:45

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 26,331

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Know wonder you missed it before it should have been posted to the Jupitertoday web site instead of the one for saturn or at least to both. Either way the Galileo probe was used to capture first atmospheric data of jupiter though there were other thoughts at the time to try for one of its moons but was scuttled due to contaminations fear. I suspect the rings are the remains from the captured planetoids or minor moons as the are shredred by jupiters emense gravity.

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#7 2004-10-09 09:53:49

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Have decided to make this also the thread regarding images of Jupiter from the now-deceased Galileo probe.

http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/images … ml]Galileo Top Science Images

*A couple of these pics have been posted at New Mars previously, in various threads; most haven't.  This is the definitive collection.   :;):  Item #2 (Conamara Chaos) -- amazing.  A feast of subtle colors and grooves.

http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sounds.html]Sounds of Jupiter

*I'm pretty sure I've previously posted (in a different thread, a long time ago -- maybe one of the old "New Discoveries" threads) two of the links available for hearing; but definitely not the "PWS Ganymede Audio" and I'm unsure if "Jupiter's Lightning Taken by Voyager" was included in that previous post.  :hm:  I don't recall hearing those two before.

Anyway, lots of cool stuff here.  smile 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#8 2004-11-09 15:11:46

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.saturntoday.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=9775]A fantastic article linking Pioneer 11 and Galileo

Here's something new to me:  "Jupiter's dark rings--as wide as Saturn's yet nearly invisible--"

Jupiter's rings are as wide as Saturn's?  I knew Jupiter's rings were dim and much less massive than Saturn's but...wow.  Didn't know about the wideness.  :-\  Based on science illustrations and the few pics, I was under the impression Jupiter's rings were *thin*.

"Jupiter's rings consist of fine dust akin to the particles in cigarette smoke. The dust grains are dark (they reflect barely 5% of the sunlight that hits them) and they are spread so thin that the rings are almost transparent. This is what makes the rings so hard to study."  The rings are apparently formed from meteor impacts on Jupiter's moons -- which then kicks up dust.

also - "Dust grains ejected into Jupiter's rings don't stay in the rings forever. The grains spiral in toward Jupiter and eventually disappear."

Article describes why rings lose orbital energy.

Maybe most amazing of all:  "Jupiter's rings are constantly replenished by meteoroid impacts, so they won't disappear any time soon. Next year's rings, however, might be made of different 'stuff' than this year's. In that sense, Jupiter's rings might be younger than you are."

After reading this article I'm doubly hopeful NASA will approve the "Juno" mission (check out that thread in the "Unmanned Probes" folder if you like).

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap950802.html]And here's an image of Jupiter's Rings  smile  Is from Voyager.

-*-

Oh why not? 

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970609.html]An auroral ring on Jupiter (Galileo Mission) 

-*-

Thats]http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970512.html]That's one mighty big disco ball!  :laugh:  (Galileo Mission)  "The size of the largest spot is about 500 kilometers across and might be high clouds illuminated by several bright lightning strokes."

--Cindy  (Yep...I love Jupiter too)


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#9 2004-11-21 20:39:39

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970609.html]An auroral ring on Jupiter (Galileo Mission)

-*-


http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap0012 … an-tas-tic!

*Jovian aurora. 

Jupiter's aurorae include several bright streaks and dots. These marks are caused by magnetic flux tubes connecting Jupiter to its largest moons. Io caused the bright streak on the far left, Ganymede caused the bright dot below center, and Europa caused the dot to its right.

-*-

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap980123.html]Double Delight

*No hints.  Nyaaaaaaaa.  :;):  (...magnetic footprints 600+ miles across, racing over the clouds...) 

-*-

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap9701 … ]Beautiful beyond words

*From Galileo.  I want that image, framed and on my wall -- even if it is in false color!  big_smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#10 2005-01-09 23:10:44

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Jupiters]http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050109.html]Jupiter's Rings Revealed

*As viewed from the former Galileo.  Jupiter is eclipsing Sol in the picture.  :up:  Apparently part of Galileo itself is obstructing the upper left limb of Jupiter.  But stunning image nonetheless; we're the first humans to ever have seen ol' Jove from that vantage point.

--Cindy

P.S.:  Note also the part in the caption which refers to dust particles high in the Jovian atmosphere.  I wonder to what height...


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#11 2005-01-10 07:25:16

Shaun Barrett
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From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

That last picture of Jupiter's rings is indeed magnificent. Especially when, as you say Cindy, we recognise that this is the first such view humans have ever seen.
    What a privileged generation we are!
                                            smile
[And so much more in store for us soon at Saturn .. we hope.  :up:  ]


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

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#12 2005-01-10 11:07:13

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Hiya Shaun, glad you enjoyed that.

Hmmmm...not sure I knew this:  If one could see Jupiter's magnetic field from Earth, it'd appear 5 times larger than a Full Moon.  :-\  Geez, I knew Jupiter had a humongous magnetic field but that analogy really brings the sheer size of it home -- especially considering Jupiter's distance from us.

Jupiters]http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/jupiter/interior.html]Jupiter's Interior & Magnetosphere

*Nice "refresher" article.  I'd not seen it before, though some of the info is familiar.  smile 

An ocean of liquid metallic hydrogen... 

--Cindy

::EDIT::  Can't resisting pointing this out:

Down deep, it's hot in there! The temperature at the core of Jupiter is estimated to be 30,000 degrees Celsius (about 55,000 degrees Fahrenheit). This heat makes its way up through Jupiter and shines through cloud-free holes in the clouds, which are appropriately named "hot spots".


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#13 2005-02-03 09:07:54

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000429.html]3D View of Jupiter's Clouds

*Spectacular.  :up:  Color coded.  The separation of layers and height variations have been exaggerated.  From the former Galileo mission.

-*-

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970808.html]White Oval Clouds

Another Galileo image.  These are near the Great Red Spot; they've existed since the 1930s.

-*-

Jupiters]http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970612.html]Jupiter's Dry Spots

There's a reference to this in the first link in this post.  :up:  Even the smallest features in the pic are "tens of miles in size."  Dark areas are dry, surrounding areas very moist. 

In December of 1995, Galileo's atmospheric probe descended into Jupiter's clouds and reported a surprising absence of water. It is now believed that the probe entered through one of Jupiter's dry spots...

These dry regions appear to correspond to locations where winds converge creating downdrafts. The downdrafts generate local cloudless clearings through which Jupiter's deeper warmer layers can be glimpsed...

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#14 2005-03-02 12:51:36

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish … 005]Jovian aurorae helped by Io

*Nice image.  Jupiter's magnetic field can create aurorae 1000 times more powerful than ours. 

This surprised me:

Spacecraft have not explored the region above the poles of Jupiter

Why wasn't Galileo sent to buzz that area?  ???  Hmmmm.

Gusts of particles from the Sun can also produce auroras on Jupiter, but unlike Earth, Jupiter has another way of producing auroras. Jupiter's rapid rotation, intense magnetic field, and an abundant source of particles from its volcanically active moon, Io, create a huge reservoir of electrons and ions. These charged particles, trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field, are continually accelerated down into the atmosphere above the polar regions where they collide with gases to produce the aurora, which are almost always active on Jupiter.

Amazing.  :up:

Chandra studied Jupiter in 2/2003 for approximately 40 hours (4 rotations of Jupiter), during intense auroral activity.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#15 2005-03-29 14:42:37

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/ob … sp]Transit times of Jupiter's GRS

Below is a calculator you can use to predict the local and Universal Times and dates when the center of the Great Red Spot should cross Jupiter's central meridian...

Or you can enter any date, between 2003 and 2007 inclusive, to find future transit times. The listed times should be accurate to within a few minutes.

*My 'scope can't resolve the GRS...but will post this for folks who might have the optics to accomplish it.  smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#16 2005-04-01 06:30:19

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Pertains to Jove and I'm not going to create a separate thread just for this.  Jupiter has been on the rise in the east; I've been observing it. 

On April 6th Jupiter will be as close to Earth as it ever gets:  Only 667 million miles.  Want to see Jupiter?

http://www.spaceweather.com/images2005/ … th.gif]Sky map

You can't miss it.  :up:

--Cindy

P.S.:  Sky map is courtesy spaceweather.com.


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#17 2005-04-22 04:40:27

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Spin baby, spin!  big_smile

weiller1_med.gif

Excellent homemade 4-hour movie from Sylvain Weiller of St Rémy lès Chevreuse, France, who used a 12-inch telescope.  Image and info hosted by spaceweather.com.

The Jovian moon you can see is Io -- and also its shadow.

Marvelous.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#18 2005-06-01 04:53:58

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.htm … 5]Amalthea anomaly

*Okay.  If certain formation theories are correct and temperatures around the primordial Jupiter (a "mini-sun" at the time) were very high, how did an icy rubble moon form so closely to it?  ???  Or did it?

Scientists were expecting Amalthea to be very rocky in composition.  Its iciness has taken them aback. 

They're speculating Amalthea formed later, as compared to the major moons (Io, Callisto, etc.).  Or it may have formed father away from Jove and been later pulled in closer. 

Scientists say Amalthea has "thrown them a curveball" as formation theories go.  This of course has implications for formation models regarding the greater Solar System.

Amalthea is a small red-tinted moon that measures about 168 miles in length and half that in width. It orbits about 181,000 kilometers (112,468 miles) from Jupiter, considerably closer than the Moon orbits Earth. Galileo passed within about 99 miles of Amalthea on Nov. 5, 2002. Galileo's flyby of Amalthea brought the spacecraft closer to Jupiter than at any other time since it began orbiting the giant planet on Dec. 7, 1995. After more than 30 close encounters with Jupiter's four largest moons, the Amalthea flyby was the last moon flyby for Galileo.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#19 2005-06-30 05:48:15

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/telescop … ]Listening to Jupiter

*Decisions, decisions...create a new thread or put it here?  Aarrrrgh.  Will put it here.

Jupiter has the proud distinction of being the first planet (besides Earth of course) from which radio signals were detected.

Interesting bit of astronomy history here:

Fifty years ago, scientists Bernard Burke and Kenneth Franklin mistook radio signals from Jupiter for a Maryland farmhand driving home after a late date

Some mistake, teehee.

They realized that the radio bursts matched up with the rotation rate of Jupiter. Scientists had started to understand Jupiter's rotation rate by watching the cloud patterns move across the planet.

By listening to the radio bursts, they were able to improve on that information, determining that the planet rotates once in about 10 hours - more than twice as fast as Earth.

Discusses L-bursts (the most common/compared with the sounds of ocean waves on a beach) and S-bursts (shorter/compared with popcorn popping or pebbles tossed on a tin roof).

Nearly all of the planets in our solar system have magnetic fields but Jupiter's is much stronger and closer, making it the only planet scientists can study from the ground in the radio range.

A long time ago I posted a kit which can be ordered (for around $150.00 IIRC) and you can listen to Jupiter with it.  Of course Jupiter has to be above the horizon at the time (it currently is in the evenings).  Will dig around for that link later today.  I've heard sound clips; some of those should still be available for listening in the links of previous posts in this thread.

--Cindy]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#20 2005-07-11 07:16:51

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.htm … 9]Modeling the Jovian subnebula

*Good abstract.  This especially caught my eye:

We also demonstrate that early generations of satellites formed during the beginning of the first phase of the subnebula cannot survive in this environment and fall onto the proto-Jupiter. As a result, these bodies may contribute to the enrichment of Jupiter in heavy elements.

Full text PDF works best for me. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#21 2005-08-31 11:29:59

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Jupiter:  Pioneer revisited

*I found this web page late last week.  Includes photos of ol' Jove I've not seen in a long time.  Mostly we're accustomed to "straight-ahead" pics, but these include shots from a variety of angles, including near the north polar region. 

Pioneer 11, the second spacecraft to fly by Jupiter, returned approximately 460 images of Jupiter and its Galilean satellites during the period 18 November to 9 December 1974. As explained in earlier chapters the trajectory of Pioneer 11 past Jupiter was quite different from that of Pioneer 10. Not only did Pioneer 11 approach much closer to Jupiter's surface - to 0.60 Jovian radii compared with 1.82 Jovian radii for Pioneer 10, but also the spacecraft approached from south of the equator and left from above (to the north). This approach allowed the spacecraft to obtain many unprecedented images of the high latitude, near polar regions. And because the outgoing leg was highly inclined to the equator of Jupiter, several good images were obtained of the planet's north pole.

Nice photos, considering their grainess and etc.  Ah well, the technology of the time.  wink

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#22 2005-09-07 05:55:51

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Jupiter's cloud bands driven by thunderstorms?

*Brief article.  Jove's jet streams might also extend into the atmosphere's interior by thousands of miles (contrary to previous speculation the jet streams stayed near the atmosphere's top).  Jove's jet streams blow up to speeds of 400 mph. 

The jets are driven by sunlight, turbulence and thunderstorm activity, the thinking goes.

--Cindy

::EDIT::  A similar article with pics


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#23 2005-11-10 06:55:59

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Organized wind chaos on Jupiter

*Wind system might reach 7,000 km into Jove's atmosphere.  Mentions 2 jet stream classes:  Strong and wide near the equator, narrow and weak at higher latitudes.

The winds alternate direction in accordance with the clouds: they blow eastward on the equator-facing side of the dark belts, and westward on the pole-facing side. The strongest jet is centred on the equator and blows with a speed of up to 170 meter per second in easterly direction.

The cloud bands/belts indicate extremely strong yet stable jet winds (which, again, blow in both westerly and easterly directions).

Driving forces are smaller, turbulent flows that are organised into the banded form by the planet's curvature and rotation.

Mentions the immense pressures deep within Jupiter, which causes "the atmosphere to take on a metallic state."  Yipes. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#24 2005-12-01 07:12:22

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

Organized wind chaos on Jupiter

Wind system might reach 7,000 km into Jove's atmosphere.  Mentions 2 jet stream classes:  Strong and wide near the equator, narrow and weak at higher latitudes.

The winds alternate direction in accordance with the clouds: they blow eastward on the equator-facing side of the dark belts, and westward on the pole-facing side. The strongest jet is centred on the equator and blows with a speed of up to 170 meter per second in easterly direction.

The cloud bands/belts indicate extremely strong yet stable jet winds (which, again, blow in both westerly and easterly directions).

Driving forces are smaller, turbulent flows that are organised into the banded form by the planet's curvature and rotation.

Mentions the immense pressures deep within Jupiter, which causes "the atmosphere to take on a metallic state."

Jovian Bands

*Is a 3D computer model.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#25 2006-02-02 08:21:11

Palomar
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From: USA
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Re: Jupiter:  Galileo, Voyager, Etc.

*Two Jovian "asteroids" now realized as comets:

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/02/01/j...mets/index.html

Two objects lurking near Jupiter and once considered rocky asteroids have turned out to be comets made up mostly of ice and dirt.

Patroclus and Menoetius are the only known binary objects around Jupiter.

The pair orbit around each other while floating 465 million miles (750 million kilometers) from Jupiter in one of the gas planet's two so-called Lagrange points.

Patroclus and Menoetius are estimated to be about 76 miles (122 kilometers) and 70 miles (112 kilometers) wide, respectively.

"It's our suspicion that the Trojans are small Kuiper Belt objects..."

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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