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#26 2005-11-03 12:42:11

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Hayabusa closing in...

*Lots of this a rehash of previously posted info, but with updated info of course.  I just hope the mission's successful.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#27 2005-11-04 11:12:19

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 27,185

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Currently the practice run to land is on hold.

MIcro/Nano Experimental Robot Vehicle for Asteroid (MINERVA) Explores The Surface Of Itokawa

Although it is a tiny lander (whose weight is less than 600g), MINERVA can investigate the surface of Itokawa using three small color CCD cameras.
These cameras are installed at 5 cm height from its bottom. Two of the cameras make up a stereo pair that is capable of looking at distance from 10 to 50 cm.

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#28 2005-11-05 06:58:48

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Hayabusa hits "snag" in practice landing run

*Occurred during November 4th practice session; problem unspecified.  Article mentions detection of an "anomalous signal" which curtailed activities.

Two other postponements as well:

That action also meant holding off on the release of an ultra-small 1.3 pound (591 grams) device hopping lander, called MINERVA – short for MIcro/Nano Experimental Robot Vehicle for Asteroid. Also postponed was release of a target marker to assist in landing Hayabua on the surface of asteroid Itokawa.

And this:

No further word as yet regarding the rescheduling of another trial run of spacecraft systems prior to a true attempt at landing on the space rock.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#29 2005-11-11 12:06:58

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Very brief update

*You can read it quicker than I can summarize the bits of info.  tongue

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#30 2005-11-11 13:26:23

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 27,185

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Here is another with a little more info:

Japan’s Asteroid Probe Cleared For Landing Attempt

Japan’s Hayabusa spacecraft is on track to attempt a sampling of asteroid Itokawa on November 19.

In a rescheduled practice run on November 9, the craft has approached within 230 feet (70 meters) of the asteroid during a descent test that verified the probe’s guidance and navigation functions.

Here is what caused the abort of the attempt on the 4th:

An onboard navigation computer detected anomalous information during the practice run.

The problem resulted in an abort command being transmitted to the probe by Earth controllers, thereby stopping the rehearsal. Subsequently, the spacecraft fired its chemical engines and started ascent, backing away from the asteroid.

Once the probe gets the samples onboard it will be just a little while like in 2007 before they will be analyzed.

Plans call for the probe’s return capsule carrying asteroid specimens to return to Earth in June 2007, landing by parachute in a remote desert spot in Woomera, Australia.

Lets hope for a better landing than the genesis probe...

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#31 2005-11-12 08:45:52

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

MINERVA deployed!

*Great.  smile 

Taking some 12 hours to descend closer and closer to the asteroid -- starting at roughly 4,600 feet (1.4 kilometers) altitude from the center of Itokawa -- the spacecraft reached a hovering distance over the space rock. The craft then released a small robot toward Itokawa’s surface....

After release of the robot, Hayabusa began propelling itself to a higher altitude above the asteroid.

No word yet on MINERVA's post-deployment condition.  Article gives another brief rundown of MINERVA's equipment and capabilities.

A target marker was also deployed:

That hardware will assist in Hayabusa’s landing on the body in order to carry out sampling operations.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#32 2005-11-13 11:43:01

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

MINERVA deployed!

*Great.  smile 

Taking some 12 hours to descend closer and closer to the asteroid -- starting at roughly 4,600 feet (1.4 kilometers) altitude from the center of Itokawa -- the spacecraft reached a hovering distance over the space rock. The craft then released a small robot toward Itokawa’s surface....

After release of the robot, Hayabusa began propelling itself to a higher altitude above the asteroid.

No word yet on MINERVA's post-deployment condition.  Article gives another brief rundown of MINERVA's equipment and capabilities.

A target marker was also deployed:

That hardware will assist in Hayabusa’s landing on the body in order to carry out sampling operations.

*MINERVA seems to have failed and is lost.   sad  sad  sad

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051113/ap_ … n_asteroid

The Hayabusa probe successfully released the Minerva surface-exploring robot on Saturday, but Minerva appeared to start drifting away from the asteroid's surface, according to a release from JAXA, Japan's space agency. Minerva was expected to land and hop around on the asteroid's surface collecting data with three small color cameras.

"Unfortunately, it appears Minerva did not recognize the surface," JAXA said.

Minerva was still in radio contact with Hayabusa late Saturday, and mission controllers were trying to find out more about its condition and location, JAXA said. Officials, however, expected the transmissions to give out soon, Kyodo News agency reported.

"It is very disappointing that it did not work out nicely..."

Yes.  sad

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#33 2005-11-13 13:15:28

Rxke
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From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,667

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Man, they so not deserved this...  :cry:

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#34 2005-11-15 13:28:45

C M Edwards
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From: Lake Charles LA USA
Registered: 2002-04-29
Posts: 1,012

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

:shock: MINERVA! NNOOOOOoooooooooooooooo.....  !   

As I understand it, though, Huyabusa still has another shot - the sample return.  I hope they are successful.


"We go big, or we don't go."  - GCNRevenger

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#35 2005-11-16 07:36:57

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

As I understand it, though, Huyabusa still has another shot - the sample return.  I hope they are successful.

Success of Hayabusa mission looking doubtful

sad 

A malfunction in Hayabusa's positioning control system - causing it to jerk in an awkward manner - is now casting doubt on its ability to position itself for the planned fire-and-dislodge attempt (to get a sample) next weekend.

Maybe it'll beat the odds.  Will keep our fingers crossed, right? 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#36 2005-11-21 08:19:58

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*Update:

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=18750

Target marker deployed.  5 images included.

--Cindy

::EDIT::  Sad update


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#37 2005-11-25 06:34:46

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*According to JAXA, Hayabusa did touch down for aprox 1/2 hour last Sunday (Nov. 20) but failed to obtain samples; yet they seem to contradict this now.  It does have 1 other chance...today:

Probe to take another try at snaring bits of asteroid.

Japan's bold Hayabusa asteroid explorer has one last shot at success in the planned late Friday descent to the surface to collect samples for return to Earth. The attempt will come three days after officials went back on initial reports and declared the probe touched down on Itokawa for up to thirty minutes last weekend.

Best of luck to them.  Entire article is top headline at spaceflightnow.com (I'd link it, but am having trouble with my mouse...).

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#38 2005-11-26 13:34:47

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*Yet another update.  It seems Hayabusa has successfully collected samples.  Now, however, it's been placed in safe mode.  It was noticed, about 3 miles from Itokawa, to be shaking; perhaps due to a gas leak from a thruster.  Communications remain stable between Hayabusa and Tokyo. 

Article

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#39 2005-11-27 19:45:45

John Creighton
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From: Nova Scotia, Canada
Registered: 2001-09-04
Posts: 2,401
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

A sample return would be a first for any country and I wish the Japanese the best of luck. However, I find any knowledge about an asteroid interesting. Did the probe use any other sensors to measure the composition of the asteroid or does the success and failure of the mission depend completely on the sample return?

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#40 2005-11-28 00:36:22

Rxke
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From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,667

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

For me, the imagery sent back is already a great addition to our knowledge re: asteroids; this is a very interesting one.
Since the last few hours, increasingly looks like the Japanese and international press is talking about 'success', however. Nowhere yet mentioning of details, but it looks like they're wrapping up, things like "we HAVE achieved 80% of our goals; we won't know wheter we really have samples untill the probe is back on Earth"... etc...
For instance: http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asa … 80105.html

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#41 2005-11-28 16:19:10

Commodore
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From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

I bet the fellow who came up with the idea of setting off a small explosion right next to the spacecraft hoping it would get peppered with debris is rather red faced right now.  tongue


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#42 2005-11-30 03:18:40

Julius Caeser
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From: Malta
Registered: 2004-03-25
Posts: 105

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Rumours have it that Hyabusa may be having problems with propulsion system and may not return to Earth after all!! sad

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#43 2005-11-30 10:15:22

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Rumours have it that Hyabusa may be having problems with propulsion system and may not return to Earth after all!! sad

*Yep.  sad  Last I read, they're still struggling to get the thruster problem under control. 

Next on the schedule for the intrepid space mission is the departure from the vicinity of Itokawa, which has lingered nearby for almost three months.  If possible, that milestone is set to occur within the next ten days before an early December deadline, after which Hayabusa will be unable to make it back to Earth because it will be out of position in its orbit around the Sun.

That's the latest from spaceflightnow.com. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#44 2005-11-30 10:20:26

John Creighton
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From: Nova Scotia, Canada
Registered: 2001-09-04
Posts: 2,401
Website

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

I bet the fellow who came up with the idea of setting off a small explosion right next to the spacecraft hoping it would get peppered with debris is rather red faced right now.  tongue

Do you think that is what is causing engine troubles? At least, the method was supposedly successful in collecting a sample.

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#45 2005-11-30 16:02:24

Commodore
Member
From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Well, causing pebbles to fly at your space craft at high speed is generally a no-no.

And what else would suddenly cause a fuel leak?

Also I've heard that they won't actually know what, if anything is in there untill it returns. If it returns.


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#46 2005-11-30 16:36:45

John Creighton
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From: Nova Scotia, Canada
Registered: 2001-09-04
Posts: 2,401
Website

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Well, causing pebbles to fly at your space craft at high speed is generally a no-no.

And what else would suddenly cause a fuel leak?

Also I've heard that they won't actually know what, if anything is in there untill it returns. If it returns.

With the low gravity do you really have much choice?

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#47 2005-11-30 17:02:08

Commodore
Member
From: Upstate NY, USA
Registered: 2004-07-25
Posts: 1,021

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

With the design decision they made, probably not. I would have perfered the Rosetta method of firing harpoons at the target, reeling yourself in, and scooping up samples.


"Yes, I was going to give this astronaut selection my best shot, I was determined when the NASA proctologist looked up my ass, he would see pipes so dazzling he would ask the nurse to get his sunglasses."
---Shuttle Astronaut Mike Mullane

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#48 2005-12-07 09:13:10

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 27,185

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

There are news reports out that are indicating that the probe may not have fire the mechognism to obtained a sample but that the probe is on its return flight home at this time.

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#49 2005-12-10 07:13:40

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*Unwelcome news:

Hayabusa Probably Didn't Get a Sample After All

Dec 9, 2005 - The Japanese Hayabusa spacecraft has moved approximately 550 km (340 miles) away from Asteroid Itokawa, beginning the journey back to Earth. Unfortunately, it appears that the spacecraft probably failed to pick up a sample from the asteroid. JAXA officials now think that a metal bullet designed to blast material off of Itokawa's surface probably failed to fire. Hayabusa is severely damaged, and will attempt to make the return journey to Earth, but managers aren't optimistic about its chances.

Article

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#50 2005-12-10 09:52:31

C M Edwards
Member
From: Lake Charles LA USA
Registered: 2002-04-29
Posts: 1,012

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Hayabusa is still limping home.  If it makes it, that would still be something, and we don't yet know that it did not successfully collect a sample. 

I will cross my fingers and wait.   neutral


"We go big, or we don't go."  - GCNRevenger

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