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#1 2004-06-25 05:24:48

Palomar
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From: USA
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*Just now found the following item at spaceweather.com for today's date (it's also something folks in the southern hemisphere can look out for on the 26th):

***
ASTEROID FLYBY: Asteroid Itakowa is about to fly by Earth. At closest approach (5 lunar distances) on June 26th, it will be about as bright as a 13th magnitude star--an easy target for large backyard telescopes in the southern hemisphere (ephemeris). Japan's Hayabusa spacecraft is en route to Itakowa now. After catching the asteroid in 2005, Hayabusa will gather samples of the space rock and return them to Earth in 2007.
***

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#2 2005-06-08 05:54:44

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Wow what an old thread and the only other place that the Hayabusa probe was mentioned in was the genisis smash one.

The Japan shoots for a piece of an asteroid with the Hayabusa probe sample-return mission nears critical stage in its quest for a celestial “smash-and-grab” space mission.

Of course there are other comet chasing probes on there way but none are to bring samples back.

The probe uses an ion-drive system with a distinctive design innovation using microwaves to ionize the xenon fuel.

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#3 2005-06-08 06:06:35

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Wow what an old thread and the only other place that the Hayabusa probe was mentioned in was the genisis smash one.

The Japan shoots for a piece of an asteroid with the Hayabusa probe sample-return mission nears critical stage in its quest for a celestial “smash-and-grab” space mission.

Of course there are other comet chasing probes on there way but none are to bring samples back.

The probe uses an ion-drive system with a distinctive design innovation using microwaves to ionize the xenon fuel.

*Congrats on finding that update.  I haven't seen an article pertaining to Hayabusa in a very long time (otherwise I would have posted it). 

Looks like all is going well enough, despite that unpleasant earlier obstacle (solar flare damage).

--Cindy

::EDIT::  Hayabusa and the asteroid will pass behind Sol beginning next month; this will restrict radio contact.  Once radio interference clears up, images should start rolling in. 

This is cool too (carries on with your mention of it, SN):

It is the first probe to use microwaves to ionize the xenon fuel. Through electrostatic deflection — like charges repel each other — the four engines can produce a slow-but-steady gain or loss in total speed amounting to as much as 27 mph (12 meters per second) per day.

That’s about the same velocity gain that a rising rocket booster racks up in half a second. But traditional thrusters operate only sporadically for a few seconds or a few minutes at a time. In contrast, Hayabusa has been thrusting for two years, and now it has essentially reached its distant goal.

Hayabusa is currently closer to Itokawa than Earth to our Moon.  Hayabusa is approaching at average speed of 225 mph.

Within a few months, after surveying the asteroid thoroughly from a safe distance, Hayabusa will swoop down to its surface and grab samples of the dirt for return to Earth, like a spacefaring bird of prey. In fact, the spacecraft's name comes from the Japanese word for "peregrine falcon."

Good luck to this mission.  cool


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#4 2005-06-08 15:42:34

Rxke
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From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,667

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

yea, they need every bit of luck they can get, the Japanese have had more than  their share of setbacks...

exciting, complex mission, deserves to succeed...

Go, peregrine falcon!

(just to show off I did read the article  wink   )

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#5 2005-08-05 07:48:52

Yang Liwei Rocket
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Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

This could be a very good mission

sounds like a great idea


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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#6 2005-08-15 10:33:44

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

August 15 Space.com Astronotes:

Mission to Bring Back Bits of Asteroid Spots Target

The first round-trip mission to an asteroid has its quarry in sight.

The Japanese robotic probe Hayabusa, formerly called Muses-C, is on a four-year, 400-million-mile mission (600 million kilometers) to bring back samples of asteroid Itokawa. If successful, it will provide the first material from space returned since the Moon rocks of the  Apollo era.

Mission officials today announced that the probe had tracked the asteroid in a series of 24 images from July 29 to Aug. 12. The asteroid appears as no more than a point of light in the pictures taken by Hayabusa’s star tracking camera, but seeing it is a milestone for the mission.

As of Friday, the spacecraft was 21,750 miles (35,000 kilometers) from the rock and slowing down. Its high-tech ion engine will soon be turned off. It will then come to rest, relative to the asteroid, 12.4 miles (20 kilometers) away.

After studying the asteroid from this perch for three months, Hayabusa will fire a bullet into the rock and collect ejected fragments. About two years later, it will parachute back to Earth.

Itokawa is a potato-shaped rock about just more than a third of a mile (600 meters) long. It is named after Hideo Itokawa, a Japanese rocket pioneer. NASA, which launched the probe, expects it to provide “a wealth of scientific return.”

Was not this probe some what damaged by the solar flares almost 2 years ago?

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#7 2005-08-16 11:44:46

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

more onHayabusa Performes Star Tracker imaging of Asteroid Itokawa

For almost two years and three months after the launch in May of 2003, Hayabusa spacecraft has traveled a long journey by way of Earth gravity assist in May of 2004, and will make a world's first low thrust rendezvous with a near-Earth asteroid Itokawa next month.

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#8 2005-08-23 06:46:03

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Background:

Formerly known as MUSES-C, the Hayabusa craft was launched in May 2003 aboard a solid-fueled M-5 rocket to embark on its journey to visit asteroid 1998 SF36. The asteroid, named Itokawa, is in an orbit that brings it close to Earth and is classified as a near-Earth asteroid, meaning its closest approach to the Sun is inside a point 1.3 times further than Earth's orbit.

Ambitious mission hopes to return bits of asteroid


Slowly pulling alongside a space rock the size of several typical city blocks, a Japanese probe is preparing to begin scooping the first dusty samples of material from the surface of an asteroid this fall for an eventual return to Earth.

Lots of stuff in the article can hardly wait for its sample return reports.

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#9 2005-09-06 09:51:51

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Now only 475 miles from target

*They're anticipating Hayabusa will soon "get the scoop" in more ways than one.  A rather unsung mission with scant media attention which may soon be in THE limelight. 

November is when the actual sample-taking process will occur.  They're referring to it as the "white-knuckle" portion of the mission.

Also, a bit of info about Minerva:

The spacecraft will also deploy a little robot, about the size of a large beer can, called Minerva, which for a couple of days will "hop" around the asteroid's surface, taking pictures and measuring the temperature.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#10 2005-09-06 10:56:00

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Yup a little bit of slowing down once near to the target while trying not be a deep impact.

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#11 2005-09-07 05:41:13

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Hayabusa returns pics of Itokawa

*Obtained September 4. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#12 2005-09-11 18:19:03

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Getting closer...closer...

The distance to Itokawa is about 220km and Hayabusa is approaching Itokawa at the speed of about 7 km/h.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#13 2005-09-12 07:20:14

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Closing in fast

*On September 7 Hayabusa was 200 km from Itokawa; as of September 12 the distance is a mere 30 km.  The image in this article is dated September 10.  A "strange" (what qualifies as "strange"?) asteroid with few craters.  It looks like a sweet potato.  tongue  Definitely has "bumps" on it. 

Hayabusa is on its own.  It's so far distant from us now that

if Hayabusa needed an emergency instruction from Earth, it would not reach the probe in time.

More info about Minerva:

Moving around on wheels works only when gravity is present, so a probe with wheels is of no use on Itokawa. Minerva travels by leaping, using its own momentum by accelerating a weight inside itself.  This is an entirely new idea.

Good luck to all aspects of this mission!

--Cindy  smile


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#14 2005-09-12 16:16:55

JonClarke
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From: Canberra, Australia
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Posts: 173

Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

For near daily updates see this site http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/enterp/missio … oday.shtml

Hayabusa is now at rest with respect to Itokawa, some 20 km away.  It will stay here until November when it begins its approach.

Jon

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#15 2005-09-15 05:21:39

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Update

*Hayabusa has performed a short chemical-thruster burn which slowed its speed by 7 cm per second.  It's begun hovering operations.  Is in good health, all instruments functioning normally.  It's obtained a series of rotation photos of Itokawa. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#16 2005-09-16 04:59:41

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

*Another first:  Composite color image of Itokawa.

Doesn't have much color.  ::shrugs::

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#17 2005-09-23 06:27:25

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Terrain on Itokawa

*...to be named. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#18 2005-10-05 10:40:44

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Starting to show its age: Japan's Asteroid Sample-Return Mission Has Problems

Japan’s Hayabusa asteroid sample-return spacecraft has lost the use of a second reaction wheel, forcing increased reliance on its chemical-propellant thrusters for attitude control and raising questions about whether it can make its planned asteroid touchdown in November,

Hayabusa ground controllers must now alter their mission profile to conserve fuel burned by the unanticipated use of the reaction control system.

If the original mission scenario is maintained, Hayabusa in November will perform what ISAS calls “touch and go” maneuvers — briefly landing on the asteroid, scooping up small samples and then taking off — before beginning its return voyage to Earth, with the samples, in December. Its arrival is scheduled for June 2007.

Would be such ashame to run out of fuel before it gets to get the sample..

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#19 2005-10-05 10:58:48

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Would be such ashame to run out of fuel before it gets to get the sample..

*Yeah...that's a vast understatement.  sad  sad  sad

Article doesn't say anything about the Minerva aspect of the mission.  I hope that's not utterly jeopardized.  neutral

Time will tell.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#20 2005-10-11 12:02:45

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Another Y-axis reaction wheel...

*...not functioning; that particular difficulty occurred on 10/3.  Global mapping of Itokawa is nearly complete.  Guidance and navigation are being controlled via radio measurements (how does that work?). 

Article is scanty.  Wish they'd give us more info on how the new Y-axis reaction wheel trouble impacts the mission.  neutral 

I'm really pulling for this mission.  C'mon, Hayabusa -- you can do it!  big_smile

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#21 2005-10-11 12:18:32

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Info for the Autonomous Navigation

It would seem through the use of its Optical Navigation Camera and a Light Detection for Ranging to the asteriod is how it is accomplished. Of course with the help of some embeded computer software routines.

To this end, Muses-C spacecraft employs an Optical Navigation Camera (ONC), a Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR), a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and Fan Beam Sensors (FBS), whose combined use enables it to safely approach and land on the asteroid. In order to successfully descend on a candidate-landing point, it not only uses an artificial target called Target Marker that is released from the spacecraft to the surface, but also adjusts its position by processing the images sent from the camera and keeping an eye on landmarks.

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#22 2005-10-25 11:45:40

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Movie

*Of Itokawa making one full rotation.  Hayabusa is at the "gate position." 

High- and low-resolution options available.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#23 2005-10-31 12:24:56

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

It appears that Japan’s Hayabusa asteroid sample-return satellite is scheduled to make the first of two landings on its target asteroid Nov. 12, a second touchdown would occur Nov. 25 before Hayabusa, begins a return flight to Earth.

If you have been following the thread you will know that Hayabusa lost the use of its first reaction wheel in July. The second failed Oct. 3, forcing increased reliance on the chemical-propellant thrusters to maintain satellite attitude control.

This has caused the project engineers to devise a fuel-conservation plan to maintain Hayabusa stably in position and at the same time provide for the two “touch-and-go” maneuvers during which the satellite will scoop up asteroid samples.

The first will test Hayabusa touchdown maneuvers Nov. 4 which the agency has called a “rehearsal descent.”

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#24 2005-11-01 12:29:42

Palomar
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Image of Itokawa's southern hemisphere

*Includes charts (spacecraft position in last half of October) relative to Itokawa.  Mentions boulders seen in Muses-Sea; previous observations (apparently at a greater distance) had suggested that area was smooth. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#25 2005-11-03 08:06:53

SpaceNut
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Re: Hayabusa - JAXA asteroid rendezvous and sample return

Star map for those that would wish to try and find this asteriod.

fig01.jpg

Some more great images of the asteriod here as well as a report of crafts functioning status.
[url=http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/snews/2005/1102.shtml]Hayabusa's Scientific and Engineering Achievements
during Proximity Operations around Itokawa[/url]

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