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#51 2016-03-28 16:41:37

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Cycler's are definitely the next step in a deep space habitat but the way I look at space stations is the more the merrier as that gives more oportunity to get more people into space and to get a great number of businesses providing services....If we up the flight rate we lower the cost.....

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#52 2016-03-28 23:00:27

Tom Kalbfus
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Posts: 4,401

Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

SpaceNut wrote:

Cycler's are definitely the next step in a deep space habitat but the way I look at space stations is the more the merrier as that gives more oportunity to get more people into space and to get a great number of businesses providing services....If we up the flight rate we lower the cost.....

You can see by this chart that physical access to a cycler space station, is going to be limited.
some_possible_earth_mars_cyclers_by_tomkalbfus-d9wx78b.png
The Aldrin Cycler passes the Earth, once every 2.135 years, (780 days) the Earth/Mars transfer time is 146 days. I am thinking we would want one cycler, the 146 day transfer time should be from Mars to Earth, and save the other 634 days for getting to Mars, because if we use Mars Direct, the astronauts will be traveling on the outbound leg in a Mars hab. The Mars Hab will contain enough supplies to last the outbound leg, plus the entire surface stay on Mars. Then we have the Earth Return Vehicle, the purpose of it will be to match velocities with the cycler, it will just be big enough to carry all the astronauts, a few meals plus the rocks they collected to the cycler. the cycler arrives in the vicinity of Mars unmanned, but with supplies sufficient to get the astronauts back to Earth in comfort, and, just as in The Martian, the Earth Return Vehicle will have an Orion Capsule attacked to it, the Earth Return Vehicle would then depart the cycler and use its remaining fuel to alter its orbit from the cycler so that it intercepts the Earth's atmosphere, the capsule then seperates from the Earth Return vehicle with its load of Mars rocks and the astronauts, the lander portion burns up in the atmosphere, while the capsule orients its blunt heat shield for reentry and perhaps a splashdown after the parachutes are deployed.

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#53 2017-02-03 21:01:20

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 26,753

Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

While the topic started about the possible breakup and one partner chosing to take there ball and go home I think we can open this up to having other stations put into orbit by others. It maybe that way if its not re-extended after 2024 again postponing its deorbit to after 2028....

Private space station coming soon? Company aiming for 2020 launch

axiom-1-module-iss.jpg

The builders of the Axiom International Commercial Space Station aim to enlarge the landscape of low-Earth orbit, to create what they view as a “historic shift” in human spaceflight.

Making a space outpost available to nations, organizations and individuals could help make living and working in Earth orbit commonplace and support the exploration of deep space, Axiom representatives said.

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#54 2019-02-05 18:59:27

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Orion Span falls far short of funding goal to support its commercial space station ambitions

Orion Span claims it can launch a one-module space station, called Aurora Station, by 2022 for space tourism, but an equity crowdfunding campaign to support the company's plans fell far short of its goal.

aurora-station-879x485.jpg

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#55 2020-11-29 20:28:51

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

It ems that Russia is looking again to ending the partnership in space with Russia's Energia suggests building national space station

Its had a few mishaps and investigations into a leak found in the Russian component module and for some its after 2025 the modules are likely to keep breaking down.

Energia estimates potential expenses on supporting the ISS to be 10-15 billion rubles [$130-198 million likely, per year].

The new station, officially named the Russian orbital service station, is expected to have three to seven modules and may host a crew of two to four people.

The deputy director-general of Energia later specified that Russia is not planning to give up on the International Space Station (ISS).

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#56 2021-09-03 07:11:50

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Russian cosmonauts find new cracks in ISS module
https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/scien … 021-08-30/
"Superficial fissures have been found in some places on the Zarya module," Vladimir Solovyov, chief engineer of rocket and space corporation Energia, told RIA news agency. "This is bad and suggests that the fissures will begin to spread over time."

The space official has said previously that much of the International Space Station's equipment is starting to age and has warned there could be an "avalanche" of broken equipment after 2025.

the ISS was a wonderful machine

There is a Chinese Station, there will be other space stations.

but at this moment many scinetists and commentators in the news think the ISS might be nearing its end

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#57 2021-09-03 14:19:25

tahanson43206
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Registered: 2018-04-27
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

For what one vote out of 8 billion might be worth, I'm in favor of re-designing the ISS for perpetual renewal.

The MIR and Tiangong model (and Skylab, come to think of it) are enough examples of experimental structures to satisfy most people.

It's time to start planning for perpetual life of space assets, and that means replace modules.  The vehicle combination (station) must be designed from the beginning to be refurbished.

If the Russian module is approaching end-of-life, that does not mean the station is.  It is possible it is the Nation that is becoming tired of holding up it's end of the bargain after so many changes over the decades.

If diplomacy has any value in this situation, I'd recommend attempting to persuade the Russians to renew their commitment to the joint endeavor.

The US long ago drove China away due to concerns about communism.  The obvious result is that the Chinese long ago abandoned any prospect of being partners in the space exploration enterprise.

The best I think we can hope for is to ** try ** for compatible docking equipment.

(th)

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#58 2021-09-03 17:27:02

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Zarya module was launched on 20 November 1998 on a Russian Proton rocket followed by on 4 December 1998 to attach the Unity module. Zvezda was finally launched on 12 July 2000, docking with Zarya.

The fact that is showing its age means replacements should have been built to replace it if we want to keep this station going.

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#59 2021-09-06 18:33:40

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

What will happen in the next 9 years, could parts of the station that still function be saved or sold off?

NASA and most scientists expect the station will eventually fail, the US expects commercial stations to take over from ISS beyond 2030

https://www.space.com/iss-commercial-sp … -symposium
The commercial space stations after 2030, NASA says

even if it were to fail in the next years I believe the ISS with its ups and downs is still a wonderful achievement, it allowed Musk to deliver his commerical spaceflight, the USA with NASA and Russia/Soveits had great feats the station added so much more to long duration spaceflight, it gave acess to Brazil, JAXA (Japan) had their experiments, Europe trained astronauts buying flights from the US and Russian rockets, and CSA (Canada) and the new Canadian designs, South Koreans doing spaceflight. Do we know enough to go to build a lab or colony on Mars, Europe and Titan from these long flight experiments. At some time the experiments and tests stop, all good things must come to an end.
I guess with such a complex lab in sapce, so many people, languages culture and private company access it might be one of the Greatest Engineering Achievements

Some still see China as a true rival and real compeditor, especially with politics and the recent Chinese feats. However others might have wanted to block Chinese access to the ISS. For these people I guess it is unfortunate in their eyes they watch China gain a stronger position offering experiments to possible international investors, Chinese gains in space with its new station plans.

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2021-09-06 18:45:02)

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#60 2021-09-06 18:46:41

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

There are parts which could be used for the lunar gateway sooner rather than later but will they since when Nasa is done with anything is to let it burn up on the way down.....

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#61 2022-04-27 12:38:42

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

'Russia Has 0 Percent Chance of Success in Space: Ex-Astronaut Scott Kelly'
https://www.newsweek.com/russia-roscosm … sa-1701498

Russia has been left increasingly isolated from the rest of the world after its widely-condemned invasion of Ukraine, which has been ongoing for more than two months, and its space program is likely to have been affected too.

A Gateway To The Moon. NASA wants to put a mini space station in orbit around the moon. Gateway — as it’s called — will support missions to the lunar surface.
https://www.wmfe.org/a-lunar-gateway-to-the-moon/120529

China's 'space dream': A Long March to the Moon and beyond
https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/2 … and-beyond

Missions to Mars, Uranus, and a Saturn Moon Could Take Off in the Next Decade
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/missions … p_catchall

Future plans for Tiangong space station
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202204/1 … 576d9.html

China to build a lunar communications and navigation constellation
https://spacenews.com/china-to-build-a- … tellation/

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-04-27 12:41:51)

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#62 2022-06-07 05:23:12

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

3 Chinese Astronauts Arrive at Tiangong Space Station
https://www.voanews.com/a/chinese-astro … 04352.html

Tiangong, which means "heavenly palace," is expected to become fully operational by the end of the year.

China 's heavily promoted space program has already seen the nation land a rover on Mars and send probes to the Moon.

The Shenzhou-14 crew is led by air force pilot Chen Dong, 43, the three-person crew's main challenge will be connecting the station's two lab modules to the main body.

Dong, along with fellow pilots Liu Yang and Cai Xuzhe, will become the second crew to spend six months aboard the Tiangong after the last returned to earth in April following 183 days on the space station.

Tiangong's core module entered orbit earlier last year and is expected to operate for at least a decade.

China sends three astronauts to complete space station (pay wall)
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/ … e-station/

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-06-07 05:24:32)

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#63 2022-06-25 18:18:57

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Shenzhou-14 mission overview
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oT8VV2u9Rjc

NASA, Northrop Grumman finish testing cislunar habitat mockup
https://www.spaceflightinsider.com/orga … at-mockup/

Expanding, And Eventually Replacing, The International Space Station
https://hackaday.com/2020/03/03/expandi … e-station/

Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), humanity has managed to maintain an uninterrupted foothold in low Earth orbit for just shy of 20 years. There are people reading these words who have had the ISS orbiting overhead for their entire lives, the first generation born into a truly spacefaring civilization.

But as the saying goes, what goes up must eventually come down. The ISS is at too low of an altitude to remain in orbit indefinitely, and core modules of the structure are already operating years beyond their original design lifetimes. As difficult a decision as it might be for the countries involved, in the not too distant future the $150 billion orbiting outpost will have to be abandoned.

Naturally there’s some debate as to how far off that day is. NASA officially plans to support the Station until at least 2024, and an extension to 2028 or 2030 is considered very likely. Political tensions have made it difficult to get a similar commitment out of the Russian space agency, Roscosmos, but its expected they’ll continue crewing and maintaining their segment as long as NASA does the same. Afterwards, it’s possible Roscosmos will attempt to salvage some of their modules from the ISS so they can be used on a future station.

NASA reveals new, next-gen spacesuits
https://nypost.com/2022/06/06/nasa-reve … pacesuits/

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-06-25 18:19:48)

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#64 2022-06-25 20:03:31

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

I have been surprised that the team onboard has not had any issues with regards to the ongoing war raging under the stations orbit.
Equally the Russians still have not taken their modules and gone their separate ways may mean that they hope this will blow over.

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#65 2022-07-02 15:53:22

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Every Major Space Event in 2022: NASA's Moon Mission, SpaceX Launches, Meteor Showers and More
https://www.cnet.com/science/features/e … -and-more/

China's Bold Leap into the Unknown
https://www.chinausfocus.com/peace-secu … he-unknown

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#66 2022-07-02 19:03:56

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Some upcoming flights to ISS

Soyuz MS-22, SpaceX Crew-5, Boeing Crew Flight Test (Boe CFT), Axiom Mission 2, Soyuz MS-23, SpaceX Crew-6, Boeing Starliner-1, SpaceX Crew-7


older discussion
Artificial gravity station

https://newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?id=7246

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#67 2022-07-10 03:50:07

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Japanese researchers are developing artificial-gravity buildings for space
https://dnyuz.com/2022/07/09/japanese-r … for-space/

Kyoto University and major construction firm Kajima have announced the start of a joint study to design a residential facility featuring artificial gravity, which, if successful, could help bring the idea of living on the moon and Mars out of sci-fi movies and into reality.

As countries and businesses race to develop technologies that will allow people to live and travel beyond Earth's atmosphere, the health implications of low gravity on the human body have recently come into focus.

Scientists at Kyoto University’s SIC Human Spaceology Center and Kajima are trying to overcome the challenge by building an inverted cone-shaped residential facility that rotates and creates a centrifugal force, thus achieving a level of gravity equivalent to the one on Earth.

The gravity on Mars is 38% of Earth’s, while the moon’s gravity is one-sixth of our planet's.

“Without gravity, mammals might not be able to reproduce and their babies might not develop well,” researchers said in their news release. “If people grow up in a microgravity environment, their body would change so they wouldn’t be able to stand up on Earth. We propose an artificial gravity-installed living facility … as a core technology to allow people to live in space.”

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#68 2022-07-26 06:47:57

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Russia to quit ISS in 2024 as Kremlin reveals plot to build rival space station

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/19322366/ … tion-2024/

Will leave International Space Station 'after 2024'

https://www.lemonde.fr/en/international … 508_4.html

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#69 2022-07-27 16:14:43

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Station called ROSS

Russian Space Station to Replace ISS Will Be Built No Earlier Than 2028
https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202207/1271534.shtml

Revealed: Russia Will Quit The ISS To Build Its Own Space Station Despite New Launch Deal With NASA
Russia will stop sending cosmonauts to the International Space Station by the beginning of 2024 and concentrate on building the Russian Orbital Service Station (ROSS).
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecarte … with-nasa/

Withdrawal from ISS in 2024, shows plans of new station
https://www.nationthailand.com/international/40018196

Russia To Prioritize Building Its Space Station Post Leaving The ISS After 2024: Report
https://www.republicworld.com/science/s … eshow.html

Republicworld dot com in another article reports

What does international law say?

While Russia is aiming to end space cooperation in the next two years, the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA), which binds the members of the ISS, states that a member cannot complete its exit without giving at least one-year prior notice to other members. The agreement applies to five members of the space station-- NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Roscosmos.

"If a partner gives notice of withdrawal from this agreement (of ISS cooperation), with a view toward ensuring the continuation of the overall program, the partners shall endeavor to reach an agreement concerning the terms and conditions of that partner's withdrawal before the effective date of withdrawal", the IGA further states. Moreover, the member pulling out of the agreement must also ensure that the elements of the space station provided by it will be available for use by the other members.

MSN and CBS reported
Solovyov claims that phase one of construction could be completed as soon as 2030, at which point the station will feature a "Scientific and Energy Module" as well as a docking module that will add six docking stations.
The latter will resemble the Nauka module, which docked with the International Space Station last year, according to Solovyov.
In his telling, Russia is also aiming far beyond scientific endeavors in Earth's orbit.
"With political will and sufficient funding, ROSS can be used as a base for assembling a lunar or Martian complex," Solovyov said. Smaller and cheaper rockets could complete the remaining trip to the lunar surface with cosmonauts on board.
Completing the construction of a multi-segment space station is a gargantuan task — and Russia's timeline is highly ambitious.
If past efforts are anything to go by, having crews visit a brand new station by 2030 is unrealistic. The development of Russia's Nauka module alone took decades — Roscosmos was hoping to originally launch the segment back in 2007, but countless delays pushed the launch to last year.
Then there's the fact that the country's space program has largely shut itself off from the rest of the international space community following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, with former Roscosmos chief Dmitri Rogozin choosing a scorched-Earth approach, burning plenty of bridges during his leadership.
And in a larger context, a largely uninhabited space station isn't exactly going to provide Russia with a groundbreaking new way to conduct scientific research in space.

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#70 2022-07-28 05:49:53

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

More mixed messages from the Russians in news reports.

NASA said it didn't hear anything, so they will quit or stay or some of this might be political hysteria from Ukraine.

Canadian cancer scientist hoping for role on China’s Tiangong Space Station
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science … gong-space

China space station: What is the Tiangong?
https://news.yahoo.com/china-space-stat … 02974.html

China launched a 23-tonne research lab module to its newly built space station Tiangong on Sunday 24 July. The lab Wentian, or "Quest for the Heavens", is expected to carry out biological and life science research.

This is China's latest step to become a leading space power.
What is the Tiangong space station?

Tiangong space station, or "Heavenly Palace", is China's new permanent space station. The country has previously launched two temporary trial space stations, named as Tiangong-1 and Tiangong-2.

The new lab Wentian is the second of three key modules to Tiangong. The first key module Tianhe - which contains living quarters for crew members - was sent into orbit in April 2021. The other key module, Mengtian science lab, is due to be launched by the end of 2022.

China has big ambitions for Tiangong. The station will have its own power, propulsion, life support systems and living quarters. It is also designed to provide refuelling power to China's new space telescope, called Xuntian, which will fly close to the space station next year.

China is only the third country in history to have put both astronauts into space and to build a space station, after the Soviet Union (now Russia) and the US.

China hopes Tiangong will replace the International Space Station (ISS), which is due to be decommissioned in 2031. Chinese astronauts are currently excluded from the ISS because US law bans its space agency, Nasa, from sharing its data with China.
China's plans to reach the Moon and Mars

China's ambitions do not end there.

A few years from now it wants to take samples from asteroids near the Earth.

By 2030, it aims to have put its first astronauts on the Moon, and to have sent probes to collect samples from Mars and Jupiter.

Past mission cancelled from long ago? Skylab B was a proposed second US space station similar to Skylab that was planned to be launched by NASA for different purposes, mostly involving the Apollo–Soyuz Test Project, but was canceled due to lack of funding. OPS-4 is an unflown Soviet space station, expected to be a fourth USSR station in the secret Almaz Russian Soviet military program. Columbus Man-Tended Free Flyer (MTFF) was a European Space Agency (ESA) program to develop a space station that could be used for a variety of microgravity experiments while serving ESA's needs for an autonomous crewed space platform.
https://web.archive.org/web/20121006071 … lrmtff.htm
The British Excalibur Almaz was a private spaceflight company which planned to provide a variety of deep space crewed exploration missions, micro-gravity science, and payload delivery. EA also aimed to offer Low Earth Orbit cargo and crew delivery and return, its Headquarters were Douglas, Isle of Man.


Possible Future Stations. Orbital Reef is the name given to the planned low Earth orbit (LEO) space station designed by Blue Origin and Sierra Nevada Corporation's Sierra Space for commercial space activities and space tourism uses.  Starlab is the name given to the planned LEO space station designed by Nanoracks for commercial space activities uses, Starlab consists of a large inflatable habitat to be built by Lockheed Martin and a metallic docking node. There is the Axiom Station company which released preliminary plans in February 2020 for how the Axiom Orbital Segment could form the basis for the Axiom Station, a potential future space station, constructed out of the Axiom Segment and additional elements upon ISS retirement and separations. Bigelow Aerospace also planned inflatable stations, in year  2020, the company laid off all 88 of its employees due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and planned to rehire staff when conditions permitted.

What to Know About Lunar Gateway, NASA’s Future Moon-Orbiting Space Station
https://gizmodo.com/nasa-lunar-gateway- … 1849194753

Russian Orbital Service Station also known as ROSS is the future proposed Russian orbital space station scheduled to begin construction in 2026. Initially an evolution of the Orbital Piloted Assembly and Experiment Complex (OPSEK) concept,
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56812294
NASAWatch on BBC World Service: Russia's ISS Plans
http://nasawatch.com/archives/2022/07/n … bb-10.html

And Today's Russia Leaving ISS Date Is ...
http://nasawatch.com/archives/2022/07/a … -russ.html

Russia to NASA: Sticking with space station until at least 2028, Reuters

"Russian space officials told their U.S. counterparts that Moscow expects to remain on the International Space Station at least until their own outpost in orbit is built in 2028, NASA's space operations chief told Reuters. The assurance on Tuesday from Russia came after the newly appointed head of its space agency, Roscosmos, surprised NASA earlier in the day by announcing that Moscow intended to end more than two decades of partnership on the space station "after 2024."

Russia says it's leaving the International Space Station again. This time might be different., Grid News

"The long isolation of ISS from geopolitics looks like it is regretfully coming to an end," said NASA Watch Editor Keith Cowing. Russia's war on Ukraine, and NASA no longer needing Russian rockets to send astronauts into orbit, has changed a long-running, uneasy, partnership in space, making it look less and less tenable. "The real question is, what are the Russians going to leave behind if they just walk away from the station?" Cowing added."

A Russian ISS exit could give NASA a hangover--then leave cosmonauts grounded, Fast Company

"You were getting this robustness, and everybody learned that there was another way of doing things," says Keith Cowing, editor of the NASA Watch news site and a former NASA manager who worked on station components in the early 1990s. But Russia's role in this cooperation has receded lately. SpaceX's Crew Dragon means NASA no longer needs Russia for astronaut transportation. In June, NASA raised the station's orbit using the U.S.-built Cygnus cargo spacecraft, a critical function that had been performed solely by the Russian section before."

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-07-28 06:05:21)

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#71 2022-07-28 20:39:08

SpaceNut
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Seems that if we wait, we will be looking at a station ending up in the Ocean before we can get something up there to permanently do what we need to replace the missing Russian pieces.

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#72 2022-08-01 09:01:42

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

No room for nationalism in space says China

https://www.spacewar.com/reports/No_roo … a_999.html

Unreasonable queries are being raised online ever since Wentian, the first lab module of China's space station, successfully docked with the core module, Tianhe, on Sunday.

On Quora, someone said that only the Chinese language is used on the spaceship and asked if the country is "super-sealed", and if they are getting rid of scientists from other countries by using a non-international language.

That's an illogical surmise, given that any emergency in space would require the astronauts to make quick responses, preferably in their mother tongue.

Even the International Space Station uses English and Russian in its operating systems. So why should the use of Chinese by Chinese astronauts in the Chinese space station raise eyebrows?

Besides, how can one say that Chinese-the language that has the most native speakers in the world-is not an international language? According to the Ministry of Education, in September 2020 the number of people learning Chinese outside China had reached 200 million, with over 4,000 colleges, 30,000 primary and secondary schools, and 45,000 training agencies having opened Chinese language courses.

Also, anybody who has visited China or has a Chinese friend will disagree that China is "super-sealed", even more so if the comment is limited to the space exploration sector. After all, China has been calling for international cooperation in space. In June 2019, China accepted applications from 17 countries and 23 entities for carrying out experiments at its space station.

There will be more such candidates as construction of the space station surges ahead. Therefore, referring to China as "super-sealed" is a typical example of Western bias, which they would do well to give up.

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#73 2022-08-06 03:26:16

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

NASA and Roscosmos officials restate intent to operate ISS after 2024

https://spacenews.com/nasa-and-roscosmo … fter-2024/

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#74 2022-08-15 09:56:10

Mars_B4_Moon
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Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

Russia unveils plans for space station to rival ISS after leaving program
https://www.newsweek.com/russia-space-s … os-1733596

Putting together a model. Russia, unveils new space station.
https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/scien … 022-08-15/

Roskosmos said in a statement that the new space station would be launched in two phases, without giving dates.

    The first phase would see a four-module space station start operating. That would later be followed by a further two modules and a service platform, it said. That would be enough, when completed, to accommodate up to four cosmonauts as well as scientific equipment.

    Russian state media have suggested that the launch of the first stage is planned for 2025-26 and no later than 2030. Launch of the second and final stage is planned for 2030-35, they have reported.

    The space station, as currently conceived, would not have a permanent human presence but would be staffed twice a year for extended periods.

Russia isolated by the imperial War in Ukraine, it will not join India and is not partnering with China, because maybe it would hurt their pride and be a feeling of servitude and maybe for the Chinese it would slow China down and become a liability. Perhpas some foremer Soviet States parts of Latin America or Gulf Arab states will pay for the tourist flights?

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-08-15 10:01:49)

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#75 2022-08-27 03:40:36

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 4,782

Re: 202*? and then there might be 2 stations in LEO

LEO and Beyond?

CAPSTONE Is Furthest From Home; Nearest to the Future of the Lunar Gateway
https://spaceref.com/newspace-and-tech/ … r-gateway/

The future of spaceflight—from orbital vacations to humans on Mars
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/scie … paceflight

Welcome to the 21st-century space race, one that could potentially lead to 10-minute space vacations, orbiting space hotels, and humans on Mars. Now, instead of warring superpowers battling for dominance in orbit, private companies are competing to make space travel easier and more affordable. This year, SpaceX achieved a major milestone—launching humans to the International Space Station (ISS) from the United States—but additional goalposts are on the star-studded horizon.

A Website DongFangHour talks about the Mengtian module
https://dongfanghour.com/the-completion … s-in-2022/

the website is not so active anymore but they have active social media video channels
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH0D4oZq3jI

We had old discussions on newmars about China and the landlock space centers going back to 2000s the spy plane incident and 43rd president Bush vision for exploration.

vid -

' In this episode, we explore China's 4th and most recent launch site: Wenchang. We notably deep dive into a lot of interesting facts surrounding the launch site's history and future ambitions.'

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2022-08-27 04:18:09)

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