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#51 2005-06-09 14:16:28

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=16914]ESA TV coverage of Deep Impact

*Hope this article will be of benefit to our European members.  smile

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#52 2005-06-17 05:50:41

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/imag … 617.html]A moving target

*Animation of Comet Tempel 1.  Terrific.

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#53 2005-06-17 07:52:15

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,850

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Another case of optical distortion solved. [url=http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8247741/]Space camera flaw traced to earthly mirror
Sources say test threw Deep Impact imager off kilter[/url]

Say what? ???

widespread rumors that the same flaw had also infected the cameras for other space probes, including a Mars orbiter now on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral and a mission to Pluto due for launch next January

Nasa engineers succeeded in developing mathematical methods to sharpen the focus for the deep space camera problem as report earlier.

It would appear that a temperature test causes the mirrors to warp.

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#54 2005-06-17 08:05:26

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Another case of optical distortion solved. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8247741/]Space camera flaw traced to earthly mirror
Sources say test threw Deep Impact imager off kilter

Say what? ???

widespread rumors that the same flaw had also infected the cameras for other space probes, including a Mars orbiter now on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral and a mission to Pluto due for launch next January

Nasa engineers succeeded in developing mathematical methods to sharpen the focus for the deep space camera problem as report earlier.

It would appear that a temperature test causes the mirrors to warp.

*They'd better straighten this issue out.  Good grief.  I have seen at least one article (last week) pertaining to a different mission and troubles along this line. 

Shape up or let's go to their testing facilities and slap 'em around a bit.  tongue  wink

Back on topic...

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#55 2005-06-21 05:22:19

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,850

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Rosetta monitors Deep Impact

Rosetta, with its set of very sensitive instruments for cometary investigations, will use its capabilities to observe Tempel 1 before, during and after the impact. At a distance of about 80 million kilometres from the comet, which will be lying about 90 degrees from the Sun, Rosetta will be in the most privileged position to observe the event from space.

The observing geometry will be favourable for observations with Rosetta’s microwave spectrometer, MIRO, and the VIRTIS visual and IR mapping spectrometer. MIRO will concentrate on the chemical composition and temperature of the gas. VIRTIS will analyse thermal emission by the comet to determine the composition of the dust ejected, and thus reveal the comet’s mineralogy. 

In addition, Rosetta will be the spacecraft carrying the best available ultraviolet instrument, ALICE, to monitor the event. ALICE will analyse the gas coming from the impact and tell about its chemical composition.

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#56 2005-06-21 12:52:19

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.htm … 96]Nucleus detected

*As previously mentioned, it's only 3 x 9 miles in size.  Scientists used a photometric trick to isolate the nucleus from surrounding gas/dust in the coma.  The image used was acquired at the end of May, from a distance of 20 million miles.

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#57 2005-06-27 11:53:40

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.htm … 249]Hubble captures outburst from Tempel 1

dramatic images of a new jet of dust streaming from the icy comet.

*Images obtained on June 14.  Tempel 1 was, at the time, 120 million km from Hubble. 

The photo at right, snapped at 14:15 a.m. (UT), reveals the jet [the bright fan-shaped area]. The jet extends about 2,200 kilometers, which is roughly the distance from Copenhagen to Athens. It is pointing in the direction of the Sun. Comets frequently show outbursts in activity, but astronomers still don't know exactly why they occur. Tempel 1 has been moving closer to the Sun, and perhaps the increasing heat opened up a crack in the comet's dark, crusty surface. Dust and gas trapped beneath the surface could then spew out of the crack, forming a jet. Or, perhaps a portion of the crust itself was lifted off the nucleus by the pressure of heated gases beneath the surface. This porous crust might then crumble into small dust particles shortly after leaving the nucleus, producing a fan-shaped coma on the sunward side. Whatever the cause, the new feature may not last for long.

--Cindy

[What's up with all the references to European cities?  Nah, don't want to get off-topic...just found it a bit odd, is all.]


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#58 2005-06-28 13:07:22

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://www.space.com/news/050628_swas_wakes.html]SWAS wakes up after 11-month "nap"...

*...to assist with Deep Impact findings/results. 

This is the first I've read of this.  I Searched to be sure it's not a redundant bit of info.

It's the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite, which was formerly in service for more than 5 years before being "put to sleep" last year.  Now it's been awoken to observe DI and Tempel 1.

"We knew there was life left in SWAS," said SWAS Principal Investigator Gary Melnick of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "SWAS's ability to detect emission from water convinced us that we could contribute to the broader understanding of comets generated by this event. This once-in-a-lifetime event was just too tempting to pass up."

Says SWAS is already at work, "taking the measure" of Tempel 1, which is ejecting aprox 730 pounds of water per second.  Apparently that's a modest amount, by cometary standards.

Now SWAS will contribute to the plethora of data that scientists hope will unlock secrets of comet structure and composition.

--Cindy  cool


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#59 2005-06-29 05:11:02

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,850

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Well yesterday I had placed a comment but on entry to post it sort of blew up, so here goes.
It is great to see that we can use what we have already up there in orbit or in other locations to view this spectical. For we will probably do this only this one time. I hope that the data collected will be of value for the future and that it will be shared.
I wonder how long it will take for the comet to disappear into nothing at the rate that it is discharging the water?
How much water did it contain to begin with and in comparison if we did mine them for there water what was the comparison of fuel used to get to it would mining prove to be of value or does size matter in this case.

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#60 2005-06-29 05:49:55

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

I wonder how long it will take for the comet to disappear into nothing at the rate that it is discharging the water?

*Hi SpaceNut:  It won't.  Tempel 1 is a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempel_1]periodic comet.  It's losing water because it's nearing the Sun, and of course is being "warmed up."  It won't lose all of its mass.  Its current period is 5.5 years. 

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#61 2005-06-29 11:40:39

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

*Extra from http://www.spaceweather.com]spaceweather.com for June 29, 2005:

Comet Tempel 1 surprised observers on June 22nd when a jet of gas and dust suddenly erupted from the comet's nucleus. See the movie.

I checked the previously-posted article dated June 27; this movie isn't available for viewing there.  You'll have to visit spaceweather.com and click on the movie; it cannot be hyperlinked, unfortunately.

Spaceweather.com also archives daily.  Sometimes it'll keep an item on the front page for a day or two, however.  After that, you'll have to search archives (by date, of course).  I believe this movie was hosted in a different article, but I can't find it now.  :-\

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#62 2005-07-02 07:10:31

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

*Want to see Tempel 1 in 3D?  This is being hosted by spaceweather.com.  Photo by M. Holloway of Arkansas:

http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2005/0 … .jpg]Click

I initially posted it as an Image, but it was too big and spread the field out too much.  Will hyperlink instead.

"Look at the small white spot in the center of the two pictures," says Holloway. "Relax your eyes and let them cross until a single image forms." Voila, a 3D comet.

It's not working for me currently (blood pressure elevation), but good luck. 

--Cindy


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#63 2005-07-02 08:04:50

srmeaney
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From: 18 tiwi gdns rd, TIWI NT 0810
Registered: 2005-03-18
Posts: 976

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

I see it's lined up for a Monday (Australian Time) so it should be good... Now all we need is some bright kids to land a nuclear engine on the Asteroid/comet, anchor down, and manuver it into Mars orbit for a useful burn up.

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#64 2005-07-02 16:35:05

Rxke
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From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,669

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

wow, there are going to be *lots* of webcasts for this one, and already lots of online images from telescopes, regularly updated greatgreatgreat.

Only that 11" Celestron on Hawai, what, are they laughing with us or what?

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#65 2005-07-03 14:06:59

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 28,850

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

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#66 2005-07-04 00:11:07

1smlstp
Member
From: 3rd planet
Registered: 2004-01-29
Posts: 32

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Just wondering if anybody else is watching this live? The ejecta is much bigger than expexted. Very exciting.

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#67 2005-07-04 01:01:02

1smlstp
Member
From: 3rd planet
Registered: 2004-01-29
Posts: 32

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

WOW! I can't believe nobody else is watching. A news briefing is coming up in 1 hour 1:00 AM pacific, 4:00 AM eastern.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepi … index.html
http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/home/ind … index.html

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#68 2005-07-04 02:20:00

Rxke
Member
From: Belgium
Registered: 2003-11-03
Posts: 3,669

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

frustratingly little webtraffic indeed..
Even SlashDot does not cover it, sheesh.
Me thinking you rabid Ammuricans would be all exited by blowing up an enemy spacebody on july, 4th  tongue  :;):

That impact picture quality is far better than I expected, allthough I can already hear some people going to whine again how it's not DVD quality

roll

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#69 2005-07-04 06:32:13

srmeaney
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From: 18 tiwi gdns rd, TIWI NT 0810
Registered: 2005-03-18
Posts: 976

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

A tad grainy on the old image sent back to earth. Obviously Budget cutbacks are affecting the Visual aspects of Good Science.

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#70 2005-07-04 07:44:04

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u … atulations, NASA!  :band:

*Everything went as planned.  The camera blacked out twice, likely from the blast of debris.  Snapped back to functionality, though; the final photo before impact was 3 seconds prior to. 

Scientists had compared the barrel-shaped probe's journey to standing in the middle of the road and being hit by a semi-truck roaring at 23,000 mph.

Yeeeeipes.

Mothership to fly within 310 miles of the crater site and return additional data.  Probably has done this already.

--Cindy

::EDIT::  Tempel 1 is brighter post-impact.  Is near Spica (in Virgo). 

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005 … th.gif]Sky Map

That info courtesy spaceweather.com.  I'll look for it tonight.  :up:

::EDIT 2::

Before the impact, Comet Tempel 1 was very dim; a telescope was required to see it. Now that the comet is so much brighter, it might be visible through binoculars or even with the unaided eye. When the sun sets tonight, step outside, face southwest and look for a fuzzy smudge not far from the bright star Spica

They also quote Don Yeomans of JPL as saying the explosion was brighter than they'd anticipated.


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#71 2005-07-04 07:45:46

GCNRevenger
Member
From: Earth
Registered: 2003-10-14
Posts: 6,056

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Nah, its a hard target to image... think of the Hubble picture of Mars and how pretty that is? Now think of an object three or four times farther away and tens of thousands of times smaller.


[i]"The power of accurate observation is often called cynicism by those that do not have it." - George Bernard Shaw[/i]

[i]The glass is at 50% of capacity[/i]

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#72 2005-07-04 07:49:13

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Nah, its a hard target to image... think of the Hubble picture of Mars and how pretty that is? Now think of an object three or four times farther away and tens of thousands of times smaller.

*Well...if you want to differ from the professional (Dr. Tony Phillips) who writes for spaceweather.com, be my guest.  smile

--Cindy

P.S.:  And yes, I do understand the scale differences involved.  tongue

::EDIT::  From a different source (universetoday.com):

For telescope users, Tempel 1 will appear almost directly between both star 68 and Gamma Virginis. Although we cannot perfectly predict what will happen after Deep Impact, studies suggest the comet will brighten to around 6th magnitude.

Magnitude 6 is about the limit of unaided-eye visibility (7 for certain).  If it reaches that magnitude, it will definitely be seen via small telescopes and binoculars (although we're reminded even then it likely won't be "particularly impressive" in smaller equipment).


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#73 2005-07-04 12:10:57

GCNRevenger
Member
From: Earth
Registered: 2003-10-14
Posts: 6,056

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Nah, its a hard target to image... think of the Hubble picture of Mars and how pretty that is? Now think of an object three or four times farther away and tens of thousands of times smaller.

*Well...if you want to differ from the professional (Dr. Tony Phillips) who writes for spaceweather.com, be my guest.  smile

--Cindy

P.S.:  And yes, I do understand the scale differences involved.  tongue

::EDIT::  From a different source (universetoday.com):

For telescope users, Tempel 1 will appear almost directly between both star 68 and Gamma Virginis. Although we cannot perfectly predict what will happen after Deep Impact, studies suggest the comet will brighten to around 6th magnitude.

Magnitude 6 is about the limit of unaided-eye visibility (7 for certain).  If it reaches that magnitude, it will definitely be seen via small telescopes and binoculars (although we're reminded even then it likely won't be "particularly impressive" in smaller equipment).

I was mainly directing my comment at srmeany, who said:

"Obviously Budget cutbacks are affecting the Visual aspects of Good Science."

I'm saying that the comet is hard to image because of its very small size, and that srmeany is being too critical and demanding of NASA in this respect.


[i]"The power of accurate observation is often called cynicism by those that do not have it." - George Bernard Shaw[/i]

[i]The glass is at 50% of capacity[/i]

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#74 2005-07-05 05:00:51

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

*Hi GCN:  Oh.  smile

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepi … ex.html]DI Image Gallery

*Image entitled "Sunny Side of a Comet" is a stand-out.  And "Blinded by the Jets."

--Cindy

::EDIT::  This info from Spaceweather.com:

alvy.jpg

Comet Tempel 1's brightness increased by approximately 2 magnitudes post-impact.  However, the brightness has not progressed to unaided-eye ability; must still use a telescope.  Binocular ability not mentioned.

In Arizona, a team of astronomers led by Rocky Alvey of Vanderbilt University monitored Comet Tempel 1 using a 14-inch telescope. This 25-image composite, spanning 2 hours and 40 minutes with the impact in the middle, reveals not a sudden flash, but a gradual, sustained increase in the comet's overall brightness. The total change amounted to 2 magnitudes, approximately. Other observers using small telescopes report similar results.

http://www.spaceweather.com/glossary/de … ]Observing guide

I was going to try for it last night with my 'scope, but forgot about 4th of July fireworks (both city-owned and private displays).  Obviously doesn't make for good observing conditions.  tongue


We all know [i]those[/i] Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#75 2005-07-05 09:08:44

Stormrage
Member
From: United Kingdom, Europe
Registered: 2005-06-25
Posts: 274

Re: Deep Impact Crashing mission - Comet Tempel 1 target

Whats the point of doing this? It's not like it is going to give away some life changing secrets.


"...all I ask is a tall ship, and a star to steer her by."

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