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#26 2005-09-02 07:09:18

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Yup just saw the NASA Uses Unique Undersea Laboratory to Prepare for Future Space Exploration on the spaceref.com site.

This image really puts the lab into propective
07.07.04.neemo.jpg

There are only a few of these sites around. We have spoke of then some time ago when I raised the question of why we had not explored and colonized our oceans.

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#27 2005-10-07 16:00:38

Grypd
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From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

There has been a major advance in the prevention of cancer in this case cervical cancer one of the most common killers of women and even when detected a major cause of surgery that leads to a much reduced quality of life. Most cervical cancer is due to a sexually transmitted virus and there is now a vaccine.

Within a year the vaccine will be available initially for young girls and then it will become more available to the general female population.

BBC article


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#28 2005-10-14 16:56:27

Grypd
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From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

The steady progress that is being made in learning what causes Humans to be and the cures of those diseases that afflict mankind continues.

In Yale they have identified a gene that could well be likely for causing the condition known as tourettes syndrome where a person can have no control over the language they intermittently use. The words used are often obscenities and cause social dificulty for the sufferer.

Yale discovers gene linked to Tourettes


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#29 2005-10-14 20:30:37

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

The steady progress that is being made in learning what causes Humans to be and the cures of those diseases that afflict mankind continues.

In Yale they have identified a gene that could well be likely for causing the condition known as tourettes syndrome where a person can have no control over the language they intermittently use. The words used are often obscenities and cause social dificulty for the sufferer.

Yale discovers gene linked to Tourettes

*Tourette's -- yes, will be interesting to keep tabs on the development of a cure or better methods of dealing with it.  I've seen (video) people with Tourette's; it's a very sad, troublesome condition.  One man in the 1970s was beaten severely; he'd been in a theater, could not control himself, attempted to leave -- a couple of outraged patrons, mistaking him for merely a "foul-mouthed troublemaker" worked him over.  sad  In the olden days, and probably still in many parts of the world, they're considered possessed by "evil spirits."  I wonder how many of the unfortunate souls have been tortured and died agonizing deaths because they were believed possessed by devils.  sad

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#30 2005-10-15 17:00:34

Grypd
Member
From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

H5N1

An interesting collection of letters and numbers. Also the greatest threat mankind is currently facing. Many have if you know history heard of the flu that swept the world in 1917-1919. It killed probably 20 million people. It had some interesting names from the spanish lady to the canton epidemic. it too was from the samples we have found in its victims a H5 varient flu.

H5 flu is called bird flu it is there it originates and for most avian species it is guick and very fatal but like all flu's it can pass to humans just not readily as it is a mutation of a mutation it needs to find the right vector.

It started in Asia but has now reached Europe and since it appears to infect but take time to harm birds like Ducks and Geese it moves fast.

Q&A Avian Flu H5N1

Even if it does not transpose to Humans fully it will effect us badly it can destroy the livehoods of farmers and as turkeys and chickens have almost zero immunity they will be the ones to suffer the most and as a result damage a rather fragile industry. Try christmas without turkey or for chickens and there eggs to be unavailable actually for medical science this is a disaster as many cures and treatments are grown in chickens eggs and as such such a virus would stop such manifacture.


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#31 2005-10-27 06:03:27

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Borg nano probes, well not quite but someday
[url=http://www.wowt.com/news/headlines/1923602.html]Robotic Surgery
Robots may replace open surgery[/url]

Small robots designed by University of Nebraska researchers may allow doctors on Earth to do surgery on patients in space.

The tiny, wheeled robots, which are about 3 inches tall and as wide as a lipstick case, can be slipped into small incisions and computer-controlled by surgeons in different locations.

Some robots are equipped with cameras and lights and can send back images to surgeons. Others have surgical tools attached that can be controlled remotely.

Big strides are being made in miniature robotics and in nano technologies.

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#32 2005-11-03 14:14:33

Grypd
Member
From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Well Nano-Tech has exploded two treatments already out there and apparently over 150 in the pipeline.

Spacedaily 150 Nanodrugs on the horizon

Great stuff especially as these are mostly aimed at cancer.


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#33 2005-11-29 09:18:17

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

While trolling I read an article on Bionic Fiction Becomes Science Fact and it is fascinating how far we have come in the field of Bio mechanical devices.

robot-cyberhand-bg.jpg

Advances like these could someday bring hope back to those that have lost limbs.

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#34 2005-11-29 09:30:09

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

*Hi SpaceNut.  Yes, interesting article.  I was a HUGE fan of "The Bionic Woman" and "The Six Million Dollar Man" as a kid.  smile 

This article doesn't surprise me in the least:

Hospitals noisier; threatens patient safety

Yes, they should pad the chart holders for starters.  Lots of personnel just let those clip charts bang noisily into the holder.  One of our local hospitals was recently taken over by a different company, and now it is very quiet there, comparable to hospital environs when I was a kid.  Previously it was very noisy, including letting small children visit at all hours and putting no (or little) restrictions on the numbers of visitors.  My mother-in-law was hospitalized there in 2000 with a broken leg; her roommate had a large family, usually 5 people consistently visiting that lady...it was noisy and disruptive to say the least; exasperating.  Someone could have easily tripped or fallen onto my mother-in-law's bed.  As for mother-in-law, generally 1 or 2 persons visiting her at a time (which is as it should be).  Now that the new company has taken over, it's so quiet there you could hear a pin drop; we visited a friend of my husband's last month and I was impressed with the order there...much more professional too.

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#35 2005-12-03 03:49:31

DonPanic
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From: Paris in Astrolia
Registered: 2004-02-13
Posts: 595
Website

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Surgeons perform first face transplant

http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.j … rans01.xml

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#36 2005-12-03 14:07:29

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Surgeons perform first face transplant

http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.j … rans01.xml

*Yes, and I wish her the very best; a smooth and swift recovery.  Hopefully there will be no problems with her natural tissues accepting the transplanted tissues.  There'll be physical therapy/rehabilitation to contend with as well; a long road to recovery.  Hopefully it'll be a full recovery. 

--Cindy


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#37 2005-12-08 11:57:30

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

[url=http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10366968/]Scientists discover how cancer spreads
Disease sends bone marrow cells to prepare new tumor sites, study finds[/url]

Scientists have discovered how cancer spreads from a primary site to other places in the body. Instead of a cell just breaking off from a tumor and traveling through the bloodstream to another organ where it forms a secondary tumour, or metastasis. Th cancer cells sends out envoys to prepare a new site.

So if intercepting these envoys, or blocking them with drugs is possible we might just be able to prevent the spread of cancer to other parts of the body while treating the main location.

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#38 2006-02-26 06:58:38

Grypd
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From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Blondes in big trouble

Cavegirls where first to have fun

It seems that at the end of the last ice age blonde hair was developed by women due to the need to attract the scarcity of males. MC1R the gene mutation responsible though is dieing out and "Natural" blondes will be extinct within 200 years.


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#39 2006-04-24 07:53:12

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

HIV-blocking gel could be ready by 2010; Researchers say medication shows huge potential a microbe-killing vaginal gels offered huge potential for stemming the epidemic, especially in societies where men are reluctant to use a condom.

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#40 2006-04-27 04:00:29

Grypd
Member
From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

terradaily.com Scientists Work On Bionic Arms

Apparently the problem for amputees is that since they cant "feel" there prosthetic limbs they do not use them. Researchers are now working on the development of artificial limbs that will be connected to the bodies nerve system allowing the limb to feel real.


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#41 2006-07-24 08:12:52

Grypd
Member
From: Scotland, Europe
Registered: 2004-06-07
Posts: 1,868

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Daily Pill to cure Alzheimer's

Tests in mice have shown the drug, PBT2, prevents build up of the amyloid protein linked to the disease.

Protein levels dropped by 60% within 24 hours of a single dose, and memory performance improved within five days.

Definitly good news but not a cure yet, but on the right track.


Chan eil mi aig a bheil ùidh ann an gleidheadh an status quo; Tha mi airson cur às e.

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#42 2006-09-27 18:45:33

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

I know that we have another thread that talked about First zero-gravity surgery set to be performed but am unable to find it.
Other sources indicate a success...

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#43 2006-09-28 05:56:14

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Doctors defy gravity in space-age surgery

0,,345875,00.jpg

When Philippe Sanchot sought treatment for a cyst on his arm, he could not have foreseen how far he would have to travel for his operation. Three surgeons and two anaesthetists were harnessed to the cabin walls to perform the operation during 20-second bursts of very low gravity created at the summit of a high-altitude rollercoaster ride.
It took eight minutes to remove the benign tumour, but to ensure that low-gravity conditions applied throughout, the surgeons worked only during the flight’s 32 weightless phases. In normal circumstances, the operation would take about six minutes, under local anaesthetic

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#44 2020-01-20 16:36:46

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

Going to mars will not leave behind the need for medical care and it will not stop those things which are caused by going. The men which went to the moon have suggested specific types of cancer and or injury to the body that show up after a period of time. Of course here on earth we still have not solved many diseases and or conditions. Chronic pain is a problem here on earth and while we know some of the causes we still are not able to cure anyone that has the condition.
Much of what has happened to those needing pain medications for the chronic levels are not getting the relief that they once did due to those faking for the drugs to get high on.

Chronic-pain bill aims to protect providers and patients

Advocates say proposed legislation would protect chronic pain patients — and the doctors who care for them.

Senate Bill 546 calls for providers to “administer care sufficient to treat a patient’s chronic pain based on ongoing, objective evaluations of the patient without fear of reprimand or discipline.” It also states that patient care and prescribing of medication, including opioid painkillers, should not be dictated by “pre-determined” guidelines.

Chronic pain patients say they have become silent victims of the drug crisis, as doctors and insurers decide to “taper” the prescription pain medications they have relied on for years, or cut them off entirely. They point out the drug epidemic involves illegal street drugs, not the prescription medications they depend on.

At issue are federal and state prescribing guidelines adopted in recent years in response to the ongoing drug epidemic that has ravaged New Hampshire and other states.

Of course those that have first hand knowledge of this know all to well

suffers from a chronic pain syndrome. “She said you can’t get a doctor to prescribe enough painkillers,

The sheer number is surprising

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 50 million Americans live with pain; 19.6 million of them suffer from “high-impact” chronic pain, defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as pain that interferes with daily life or work activities.

Of which you become a member of the ones that suffer as to the conditions of chronic pain....

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#45 2020-01-29 22:45:09

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

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#46 2020-02-01 09:56:11

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

We know that non invasive testing and monitoring is part of the goal to protect life and treatment.
From Antarctica to space: telemedicine at the limit

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#47 2020-02-04 20:54:42

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

This is a big deal for burn victums that must other wise have skin grafts from other parts of the body to keep from dying.
Handheld Bioprinter That “Prints” Skin Cells Onto Wounds

A team of researchers in Canada have successfully trialed a new handheld 3D skin printer, which treats severe burns by 'printing' new skins cells directly onto a wound.

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#48 2020-02-05 00:49:57

kbd512
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Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 4,615

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

SpaceNut,

That's truly excellent news.  We're definitely taking that technology to Mars.

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#49 2020-02-20 20:00:01

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

Re: Medical Science Potpourri

3D Printed Body Parts Could One Day Help Wounded Soldiers

This would also fit in the cosmetic field of endevour as well...

The next two teams are working on how to produce blood vessels capable of carrying blood. The blood vessel project is useful by itself but also seen as a precursor to eventually printing blood-carrying organs. Another team is developing a working meniscus, a thick piece of cartilage that sits between the thigh bone and shinbone. The last team is working on the project’s most ambitious effort, printing a human liver.

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#50 2020-03-09 20:36:30

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,099

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