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#426 2019-04-04 09:00:32

victoriabam
Member
From: Mississauga, ON
Registered: 2019-04-04
Posts: 1

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

Love to hear the story. Being a explorer not always means the expel of diverse nature.

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#427 2019-04-05 21:02:17

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

We will have water that is recycled with the help of life support but over time we will want to be able to switch over to more natural method to save the equipment.

How to Make a DIY Water Filtration System Using Sand or Gravel

https://itacanet.org/eng/water/Section% … _CAWST.pdf

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#428 2019-05-29 21:18:14

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

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#429 2019-05-30 04:40:02

louis
Member
From: UK
Registered: 2008-03-24
Posts: 5,870

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

That's a very interesting development Spacenut.

We already have ways of releasing oxygen but I guess this all comes down to what the energy input is per yield of oxygen. This new approach might potentially be more energy effective in the long run...who knows?

One thing I would recommend for everyone is checking out the weight of an atmosphere. We produce about 40 billion tons of CO2 working flat out, all 7 billion of us!, and that is just a pinprick in terms of atmospheric mass. Any project to create a new, breathable Mars atmosphere will be a truly huge undertaking.  My feeling is that heating up the planet with reflectors (maybe much closer into the Sun, in terms of orbit), may yet prove the most cost effective method in terms of raising pressure. But yes, then you need to work on making it breathable. That may be quite a long term project.


Let's Go to Mars...Google on: Fast Track to Mars blogspot.com

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#430 2019-06-03 21:33:30

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

Power from waste water

Between flushing the toilet, bathing, and washing dishes, the average person in the United States generates almost 100 gallons of wastewater each day. And dealing with that water requires a lot of resources. In fact, treating water, including sewage, accounts for 3 to 4% of all the energy used in the United States.

But imagine if that water – even sewage – could itself be used to help generate energy. We're going to take you inside a utility plant in suburban Chicago that's doing just that. It's generating all the power it needs to run … just using the waste that it collects.

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#431 2019-06-29 09:37:40

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

The key to succeeding on mars will be partly in what we do bring but also from what we use of mars Paragon Space Development Corp awarded NASA contract for ISRU technology for the development and testing of the ISRU-derived water purification and Hydrogen Oxygen Production (IHOP) affordability of future human spaceflight missions by limiting the need to launch supplies, such as oxygen, water, and propellant from Earth.

The IHOP system purifies naturally occurring deposits of water and generates oxygen and hydrogen at commercially competitive scales. Once delivered to the moon, IHOP will provide the water and oxygen needed for a continuous human presence on the moon, and the low cost propellant needed to explore the solar system.

lightweight electrolyzer technology which is the direct product of over 30 years of PEM electrolyzer development with NASA for life support, energy storage and ISRU

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#432 2019-06-29 11:50:33

kbd512
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Registered: 2015-01-02
Posts: 3,723

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

SpaceNut,

Paragon SDC has been leading the charge for better life support technology for space applications and I've posted about the research work they're doing for NASA a number of times in various topics.  They're the ones who have come up with some of the most highly efficient, lightweight, low-power-consumption technologies for air and water recycling for NASA and others.  They were always an obvious choice to develop life-support-related ISRU technology for Mars.  Giner Inc, the company developing the electrolyzer, does work for the Navy, as well as other branches of our military.

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#433 2019-09-11 18:56:26

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

Priority list:
Oxygen generation systems
water generation
Food greenhouse
waste removal and recovery or recycling ( feed stock for oxygen and water)
power (progressive use of kilowatt reactors and solar array farms)
new shelters and structures to be built by priority

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#434 2019-10-16 20:46:55

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/file … elease.pdf

“Typical” U.S. family of four:
100 gallons/person/day (379 kg/person/day)

This is both indoor and outdoor usage; 70% indoor and 30% outdoor

Source: U.S. EPA; https://www3.epa.gov/watersense/pubs/indoor.html
• “Typical” U.K. family of four:
30 gallons/person/day (112 kg/person/day)
– Source: http://www.ccwater.org.uk/savewaterandm … gewateruse

Summit Station, Greenland (winter): ~18 gallons/person/day (68 kg/person/day)

Based on an average population of four people

Source: Haehnel and Knuth “Potable water supply feasibility study for Summit Station, Greenland”

Summit Station, Greenland (summer): ~9.4 gallons/person/day (36 kg/person/day)

Based on an average population of 30 people

Source: Haehnel and Knuth “Potable water supply feasibility study for Summit Station, Greenland”

Mars Surface Crew (with laundry): ~3.5 gallons/person/day (13.3 kg/person/day)
– Based on a population of four crew

Mars Surface Crew (without laundry): ~1.6 gallons/person/day (6.0 kg/person/day)
– Based on a population of four crew

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#435 2019-10-22 20:59:56

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

Life Support: Air, Water, and Nutrition

Sample Menu

Some menus from past Russian and US missions:


             
            Typical daily menu of a Soyez cosmonaut

            Breakfast: Canned meatloaf, bread, chocolate sweets with nut praline, coffee with milk, prune juice
            Lunch: Canned beef tongue, bread, prunes with nuts
            Dinner: Caspian roach, bortsch, canned veal, rich pastry, black currant juice
            Supper: Cream cheese with black currant puree, candied fruit, black currant juice

             

            Now, for contrast...
            The typical menu of an Apollo astronaut:

            Breakfast: Apple sauce, sugar frosted flakes, bacon squares, cinnamon toast, cocoa, orange drink
            Lunch: Beef with vegetables, spaghetti with meat, cheese sandwhich, apricot puding, gingerbread
            Dinner: Pea soup, tuna salad, cinnamon toast, fruit-cake, pineapple-grapefruit drink.

Learning how to shift our diet is just as important as learning to grow these same foods on the cycle to be able to have these same meals....

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#436 2020-01-12 20:08:41

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/file … 6-ADD2.pdf
Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 – Addendum #2


pg 430  has tables for what a crew will need.

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#437 2020-08-20 18:41:13

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

mixed topic that includes discusion on habitats which are crew size limited with supply resources possible with current day rocket payloads.

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#438 2020-08-24 12:47:48

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 19,719

Re: Air. Shelter. Water. Food.

The term shelter for the most part so far has been discussed as a place for man as a habitat but what about a garage to work in since working in a space suits on a rover or other items will be a non starter as the suits could get torn and then you are in real trouble.

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