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#26 2020-12-02 05:11:51

jfenciso
Member
From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 82

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

SpaceNut wrote:

Seems we are way off topic on building soils to grow food in...

Building fertile soils

Building Soil, Building the Future

Build better garden soils

8 Steps for Making Better Garden Soil

Making Biochar to Improve Soil

other words carbon in the soil is good for plant growth

I have a doubt to use biochar in space because you will use a lot of oxygen and electrical energy to ignite the crop waste. I need to study more about biochar. This time, I am skeptical about biochar. We need to balance and account for the use of resources like air in a closed-loop habitat system. No resources should be wasted.


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. I am a Master's degree student at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. My major degree is in Botany (specializing in Plant Physiology), and minor in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#27 2020-12-02 18:28:21

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,829

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

Human Waste recovery plus all other recycling from the 6 to 8 month journey to mars would be the means to jump start Mars in situ but that mass volume is the problem for the landing along with the storage.

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#28 2020-12-02 22:54:20

jfenciso
Member
From: Philippines
Registered: 2018-10-27
Posts: 82

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

SpaceNut wrote:

Human Waste recovery plus all other recycling from the 6 to 8 month journey to mars would be the means to jump start Mars in situ but that mass volume is the problem for the landing along with the storage.

I will try later to look for a research paper about the possibility of human waste produced from Mars. big_smile


I'm Jayson from the Philippines. I am a Master's degree student at the University of the Philippines Los Baños, Laguna. My major degree is in Botany (specializing in Plant Physiology), and minor in Agronomy. My research interests are Phytoremediation, Plant-Microbe Interaction, Plant Nutrition, and Plant Stress Physiology.

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#29 2020-12-06 21:39:14

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,829

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

What A Simulated Mars Mission Taught Me About Food Waste
This is also a waste in that we grow food and are not eating it all...but then again put it into a compost or bio reactor and make extra fuels and use it for enriching the soils comes to mind as to methods of reuse.

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#30 2021-06-11 14:58:55

Mars_B4_Moon
Member
Registered: 2006-03-23
Posts: 1,001

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

Will a Mouse be one of the first creatures to set foot in the Mars colony before man?
I think I might finally understand that ridiculous Saturday morning kids cartoon 'Biker Mice from Mars'

You might be eating mouse burgers

More fertile Soils made from mouse poop and dead decaying plants from hydro farms in space?

Space Agriculture: Crops Can Be Grown on Moon and Mars Soil
https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/2 … d-mars.htm

Soils are monitored in far away places on Earth, Waste is Recycled in remote Places like Iceland.

Iceland Waste Disposal and Recycling
https://reykjavik.is/en/waste-disposal-and-recycling
Microbial Nitrogen Cycling in Antarctic Soils
https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2607/8/9/1442/htm

Scientists Produce Healthy Mice From Sperm Kept in Space for Nearly 6 Years
https://www.space.com/space-pups-born-f … ouse-sperm

Last edited by Mars_B4_Moon (2021-06-11 15:00:43)

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#31 2021-11-21 10:03:25

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 23,829

Re: Soil Manufacture on Mars

tahanson43206 wrote:

For RobertDyck,

The article at the link below is about a book about soil.  I am hoping this post is a good fit in the debate you have set up here:

***

The article at the link below is about the value of soil for growing food. It includes the assertion that growing food in rich soil provides more nutrients than growing food in non-soil environments, but I suspect that may be more a reflection of deficiency in the practice than a fundamental deficiency in the method.

Never-the-less, I get the impression by a soil enthusiast would be worth considering by anyone serious about living off Earth.

It appears to be written for those who live or may live on Earth, but the principles should be transferable to other planets and locations.

If a member of NewMars decides to read this book, please post a synopsis.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/solutio … 29732.html

The solution to climate change? It could be right under your feet
Jamie Blackett
Sat, November 20, 2021 1:25 PM

Pulling a carrot from the earth - Alamy
This is a very timely book. Farmers are pondering regenerative agriculture, gardeners are discussing “no dig” and we are all worried about reaching carbon “net zero”. But few of us know what we are talking about, largely because the scientific community has spent more time studying the stars than the soil on which our survival depends. As Matthew Evans observes: “For me, soil seemed dull and insipid.” Yet, “Good soil isn’t just an abstract concept; it’s a thing of wonder … There are more living things in a teaspoon of healthy soil than there are humans on Earth.”

Most importantly, Evans explains how regenerative agriculture that draws carbon out of the atmosphere into the soil so that it is “like chocolate cake’” (through minimising soil disturbance and exposure, diverse cropping and grazing livestock) is our best hope of reversing climate change. He quotes Stéphane Le Foll’s “quatre pour mille” idea: that if all the world’s soils under human management were to increase in soil carbon by just four parts per 1,000 (0.4 per cent) annually, virtually the entire global increase in carbon emissions for each year could be offset. Suggestion for Mr and Mrs Thunberg: please pop a copy of Soil into Greta’s stocking this Christmas.

Soil is published by Murdoch Books at £14.99. To order your copy for £12.99 call 0844 871 1514 or visit the Telegraph Bookshop

(th)

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