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#51 2004-08-05 11:37:58

Palomar
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid5]Mmmmmmm...YUMMY!

*Tell me that's not a spectacular image.

Western flank of Olympus Mons.  Distance 266 km.

--Cindy[/color:post_uid5]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#52 2004-08-11 12:17:10

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid5]Looking North

*Nice to get a [b:post_uid5]direction[/b:post_uid5] mention.  "Perspective view."  Caption mentions "tectonic faults."  Taken with HRSC.

--Cindy[/color:post_uid5]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#53 2004-08-17 07:36:08

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid2]Gouges on Mars

*Taken in June, released this week.

Looking north.  Dao Valles and Niger Valles areas..."at a point where the north-eastern Hellas impact crater basin and the Hesperia Planum volcanic region meet...

The images are centered at Mars longitude 93° East and latitude 32° South."

Mentions surface areas resulting from lava streams, "probably in 'run-off' process."

--Cindy[/color:post_uid2]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#54 2004-08-18 11:31:00

Stu
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From: Kendal, Cumbria, England
Registered: 2001-09-04
Posts: 318
Website

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid0]Not often I'm lost for words  :;):  but I honestly can't think of words to describe how stunning this 3R Mars Express image is...

http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/mar … an-dao.jpg

Do yourself a favour - download it, grab your glasses, then set aside half an hour to just gaze down the sheer cliff walls.

Very humbling.

S[/color:post_uid0]


Stuart Atkinson

Skywatching Blog: http://journals.aol.com/stuartatk/Cumbrian-Sky

Astronomical poetry, including mars rover poems: http://journals.aol.com/stuartatk/TheVerse

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#55 2004-08-24 06:31:35

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid6]Teardrop

*Strange.  Like another pic I posted yesterday (in the "Devils & Dunes" thread), the winds are coming from an easterly direction.

Strange olive color surrounding the dune cluster.  :-/  The HRSC does take true-color photos only, correct?  Maybe the land around the dunes looks unusually olive due to the contrast of the color of the dunefield itself and the bit of crimson seen in the upper right-hand corner?

--Cindy

[b:post_uid6]::EDIT::[/b:post_uid6]

Different pic of the above --   Posted 8/25 at universetoday.com.  Looks even weirder -- that "little" rash of dunes just "right there" within the crater.  Wild.  smile

Article says:  "...how it got to the bottom of this crater is a mystery."[/color:post_uid6]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#56 2004-08-30 18:25:34

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid5]I first read this as "Eros Chasma" 

*It's [i:post_uid5]Eos[/i:post_uid5] Chasma.

What added romance in a marriage will make one misread!

The colors are so reminiscent of the desert I reside in.  Especially the dusky purplish hues. 

Hard to believe the highest point in the plateau is a bit over 3 miles -- dimensions so difficult to "guestimate."

--Cindy[/color:post_uid5]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#57 2004-09-02 05:26:43

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid6]3D perspective of Eos Chasma

*Quite a view.  Looks like you're hovering from just above and straight-on. 

--Cindy[/color:post_uid6]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#58 2004-09-10 14:18:12

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid5]Heavily eroded crater on Mars

*Solis Planum, May 2004.  [b:post_uid5]Blue-white areas are light haze or clouds[/b:post_uid5].

Mentions tectonic "graben" structures. 

"A graben is a down-dropped block of the crust resulting from extension, or pulling, of the crust. They are often seen together with features called ‘horsts’, which are upthrown blocks lying between two steep-angled fault blocks. Some of the graben shown here are about five kilometres wide." 

Okaaaay...thanks for the explanation.  roll  Not all of us are professional scientists!

The more pics of Mars I see, the more I'm convinced copper and turquoise will be really popular colors there.   :;):

--Cindy[/color:post_uid5]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#59 2004-09-10 16:40:15

djellison
Member
From: Leicester,UK
Registered: 2004-08-31
Posts: 113

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid0]Insane thing is - we've not seen a single image at the highest resolution from MEX yet. These are all in the 12 - 60m res range - not a single image at the <2m res yet !

Doug[/color:post_uid0]

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#60 2004-09-10 19:01:24

Shaun Barrett
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From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]Thanks, Stu, for that Aug. 18th post linking to the 3-D image. I must have missed that somehow. The vertical relief is spectacular!
    And thanks, Cindy, for the image of the heavily eroded crater. It makes you think, doesn't it? It appears that powerful erosive forces must have been at work over long periods for such varied relief and geology to come about. The erosion of most of the 1000 m high wall of a crater 53 kilometres wide is enough in itself to indicate the power of the forces involved, but that could have been a sudden massive flood of water. How about the 15 km diameter raised circular structure, described as inverted relief? According to the geologists, this probably started life as a crater which gradually filled with 'sediment' (sediment implies material deposited in water, generally). How long might that have taken? Then the sediment became compacted and hardened. How long would that take? Then the walls of the crater gradually eroded down, lower than the remains of the hardened sediment. How long would that take? And, if you look at the structure as it is today, you can see that even this hardened 'core' of sedimentary material has begun to erode away quite extensively.
    To me, all this doesn't sit well with the idea that Mars had about a billion years of 'weather' and then things became much like the Moon during the last 3.5 billion years, with little or no change. Something's definitely not right here.
                                          ???[/color:post_uid14]


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

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#61 2004-10-08 05:34:47

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid6]Ophir Chasma

*Includes desktop and other images for viewing.

--Cindy[/color:post_uid6]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#62 2004-10-08 07:32:02

Shaun Barrett
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From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]Excellent pictures!
    I now have a new desktop.    :up:

    I notice that all the dark sand/dust which appears in these hollows and chasms is always exactly where intuition tells you you might expect to find water if these low areas were on Earth. The shape and elevation of the dark patches is uncannily like what you would expect if the dark sand were in fact water. You never see it on raised ground or on slopes - always at the lowest points in the topography.
    Interesting ...     ???
    I wonder if these dark patches were actually associated with former lakes and ponds in some way. Could they be somehow associated with water even today? Why doesn't the ubiquitous red dust, found everywhere on Mars, settle in these low areas and obscure the dark sand? Could it be that the areas are dark because of a still extant water table keeping the soil wetter and darker?
    I really have no idea what I'm talking about - just airing a few rambling thoughts.
                                        tongue    smile[/color:post_uid14]


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

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#63 2004-10-12 10:17:36

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid6]Dust-obscured Martian landscape

*Taken in May 2004.  Dust devil tracks can be seen.  :up: 

"The dust devils are not limited by geomorphological boundaries: for example, their tracks cross the crater rim. Dust devil tracks can also be seen on the thick dust layer in the southern part of the crater."  Yep, those critters have been whirling away.  :laugh:

Oooo...check out the part about the large impact crater.  Yipes.  And the depth of the layer of dust/volcanic ash.

--Cindy[/color:post_uid6]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#64 2004-10-12 20:52:10

Shaun Barrett
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From: Cairns, Queensland, Australia
Registered: 2001-12-28
Posts: 2,843

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid4]Notice the inner slope of the crater, at about 8 o'clock, has one of those broad dark bands which created so much excitement back in 2002 (? I think). They were thought to be evidence of present-day flows of brine from a water-table just below the surface.
    This dark band appears to 'flow' down to the floor of the crater, where it meets the large dark area. This large dark area is attributed to 'deflation', the "lifting and removal of loose material". The fuzziness of the rest of the picture is explained as being due to the accumulation of dust or volcanic ash
    These explanations appear self-contradictory to me. The lowest part of the crater is the only part not covered with the light-coloured dust or ash, though this is where you'd expect it to accumulate the most. This lowest more-sheltered area, where the airflow is presumably the slowest, is the only place which has been subjected to "lifting and removal of loose material"!  How?

    The dark 'flow band' on the inner crater wall has been ignored. The low-lying darker region into which it appears to flow is assigned an explanation which, at least to me, doesn't make sense.
    I think a more logical, and less contrived and convoluted, explanation might be that the dark areas on the crater wall and on the crater floor are caused by wetting with briny water.

    Waddya think?    ???[/color:post_uid4]


The word 'aerobics' came about when the gym instructors got together and said: If we're going to charge $10 an hour, we can't call it Jumping Up and Down.   - Rita Rudner

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#65 2004-10-13 01:00:22

atomoid
Member
From: Santa Cruz, CA
Registered: 2004-02-13
Posts: 252

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000F22:post_uid0]

I notice that all the dark sand/dust which appears in these hollows and chasms is always exactly where intuition tells you you might expect to find water if these low areas were on Earth. The shape and elevation of the dark patches is uncannily like what you would expect if the dark sand were in fact water. You never see it on raised ground or on slopes - always at the lowest points in the topography.
    Interesting ...     ???
    I wonder if these dark patches were actually associated with former lakes and ponds in some way. Could they be somehow associated with water even today? Why doesn't the ubiquitous red dust, found everywhere on Mars, settle in these low areas and obscure the dark sand? Could it be that the areas are dark because of a still extant water table keeping the soil wetter and darker?
    I really have no idea what I'm talking about - just airing a few rambling thoughts.[/quote:post_uid0]
The elevation seems quite exaggerated in these "reconstructions". note that the captions on all those images say "This close-up perspective view was calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the stereo channels." anyone know if the rendering represents the "true" elevation, or if its exaggerated for illustrative/aesthetic purposes?

Shaun, about the wet mud and red dust. I tend to think that the dark stuff is actually the red dust, or maybe just dark dust like the images of the dark stuff that gets blown out of cracks and craters linked in other posts recently, but its so hard to tell true colors on Mars anyway, these mars express image colors seem sort of "rendered", it just seems too "normalized" or something(!). i tend to think its not "wet" since there isnt much "recent" terrain modifcation and erosion that would seem to imply, since the geological conditions would remain the same for so long and water, being the most volatile element on mars would impart a relatively huge influence in modifying the terrain if it were there by freezing/sublimation/melting/expaning/contracting/dissolving/depositing/flowing/aggregating... well, wind action would do a lot of shaping also, and maybe would cover up or modify any such water affects, but then i get thinking cold brine tables might not actually have much effect on the terrain in the first place if they dont act like fresh water... i tend to have second thought about everything when it comes to figuring out mars, since i dont really know what im talking about either!

and the "flow" in the crater in the next post, yep, those have always mystified me, nasa likes to explain them away without further inquiry as "dust avalanches" hmmm, it seems a sensible explanation, but you raise an interesting point, that would seem to suggest nasa would say that the dark floor is either "ruffled dust" like an avalanche or is different material than the "flow" feature itself that somehow end up looking the same color... neither of these explanation seems right. mystery remains.[/color:post_uid0]


"I think it would be a good idea". - Mahatma Gandhi, when asked what he thought of Western civilization.

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#66 2004-10-13 11:41:20

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,490

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]The main antenna for Mars Express known as the MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding) which is a spindly shaped radar antenna - which could discover underground water on Mars - will now not deploy on Europe's Mars Express spacecraft until at least March 2005.

Mars Express 'divining rod' mission delayed
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996509[/color:post_uid14]

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#67 2004-10-18 07:30:02

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid5]

Dust-obscured Martian landscape

*Taken in May 2004.  Dust devil tracks can be seen.  [/quote:post_uid5]
Here's an UPCLOSE pic of those devil tracks  :up:

Mars Express 'divining rod' mission delayed
[/quote:post_uid5]

*I wish the scientific community would quit using superstitious terms in conjunction with what they're trying to accomplish.   :angry: 

--Cindy[/color:post_uid5]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#68 2004-10-18 07:58:13

SpaceNut
Administrator
From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,490

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]Here is a great link to past missions and of the future for mars exploration.

Mission to Mars: Risky Business
http://www.astrobio.net/news....thold=0[/color:post_uid14]

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#69 2004-10-19 13:45:36

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid6]Edge of Huygens Crater

"The rim is heavily eroded and shows a ‘dendritic’ pattern. This observation suggests surface water run-off.

Dendritic systems are the most common form of drainage system found on Earth. They consist of a main ‘river’ valley with tributaries with their own tributaries. From above, they look like a tree or a river delta in reverse."

*Yep. 


--Cindy[/color:post_uid6]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#70 2004-10-20 07:16:16

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid1]Well whaddya know...

*Yet another perspective of the image above.  (Aw...Santa Claus came early this year!).  Actually, they're both terrific photos in their own right; the previous one better displays the dendritic pattern.  Craters and "cliff walls" stark in this pic.

Such gorgeous colors. 

--Cindy[/color:post_uid1]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#71 2004-10-20 07:23:49

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,490

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]I can just make out what looks like the carving of a river bed that heads towards the small crater to the right side of the photo.[/color:post_uid14]

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#72 2004-11-03 15:18:02

Palomar
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From: USA
Registered: 2002-05-30
Posts: 9,734

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#8D38C9:post_uid1]Tithonium Chasma

*Western end of Valles Marineris.  Detailed caption.

--Cindy[/color:post_uid1]


We all know those Venusians: Doing their hair in shock waves, smoking electrical coronas, wearing Van Allen belts and resting their tiny elbows on a Geiger counter...

--John Sladek (The New Apocrypha)

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#73 2004-11-11 20:53:55

SpaceNut
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From: New Hampshire
Registered: 2004-07-22
Posts: 17,490

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid14]Martian moon Phobos in detail

Lots of details and photo to be in awe of...[/color:post_uid14]

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#74 2004-11-12 00:36:26

hubricide
Member
Registered: 2004-07-26
Posts: 49

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid0]I wonder why it has all those parallel grooves..  It looks suspiciously like the moon is composed of a bunch of layers to me, but what that means exactly, I do not know..  How else would such parallel grooves form?  Is Phobos some broken-off chunk of Mars?  Did Phobos form in a localized gravity well that caused particulate matter to gather up from bottom to top in well-defined layers?

Perhaps we'll never know.[/color:post_uid0]

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#75 2004-11-12 03:48:58

Yang Liwei Rocket
Member
Registered: 2004-03-03
Posts: 993

Re: Mars Express (MEX) - ESA orbiter

[color=#000000:post_uid0]Anyone catch the 3-dimensional effects from SpaceNut's post

http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images....res.jpg

http://www.esa.int/images/116-051004-07 … obos_L.jpg

cool[/color:post_uid0]


'first steps are not for cheap, think about it...
did China build a great Wall in a day ?' ( Y L R newmars forum member )

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